Rates charged for rescue dogs.

PWCorgi

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#1
How do you feel about charging higher rates for purebred dogs in rescue than for mixed breeds in rescue?
What about more for puppies than adults?
Should dogs being placed with behavioral issues be less money, since that person now has to pay for training to work on said behavioral issues? What about medical issues? Should these dogs even BE placed?

Aaaaand GO!
 
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#2
Up to each rescue as to what works best for them. Supply and demand is an important part..if someone is willing to pay a higher amount for a certain breed or puppy and that helps another dog get medical care, cool.
 

SpringerLover

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#3
I really think breed specific rescues have the upper hand. They seem to be able to do what they want and still maintain a successful rescue. I never knew organizations like ESRA existed to the extent they do, before Diego.

Our dogs are $300 no matter what unless it is a senior for seniors program dog.
 

lancerandrara

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#4
I thankfully haven't seen a rescue around here who charges more for purebred than for mixed. But for those that do, this doesn't really make sense to me all, seeing as the intention of a "rescue" should be to RE-HOME dogs not to earn extra cash based on the dogs heritage they happen to receive.

I agree with a higher re-homing fee for puppies than adults though. Mainly, too many people (including "non-dog-savvy" people) want a puppy- even more motivation for a random new dog owner who wants a cute lil puppy to get a puppy on the cheap. Generally, it pays for vaccinations and neutering too. Second, for the first reason, it's a ton harder to re-home adult dogs in comparison and some may have been living at the rescue for quite awhile already. I've stalked dogs that have been at the rescue for YEARS without finding a forever home. (But they also don't lower the adoption fee just because of this, which is a positive for me.)

I believe that most people browsing the dogs would be more put on to adopt the adult, and more put off on the puppy, since the fees are lower... it equalizes their "popularity levels", I think. It prevents too-casual potential adopters from charging at puppies just by seeing the numbers. (I hope this made any sense at all)

As for a lower fee for behavioral/medical issues... as long as it's not TOO low. Most people around here know that dogs that are too "cheap" can easily get taken as bait for dog fighting. Dog fighters often get a friend or relative with a "nice-looking home situation" for the rescues to approve, and then take the adopted dog for illegal activities.

Dogs with medical issues should definitely still be placed. There are still good souls out there who aim to adopt the special needs dogs that 95% of other adopters wouldn't go for. If a rescue didn't pick them up to begin with, where else would the special needs dogs go other than get euthanized? IMO we need to give dogs the second-chance, 99.9% of the time.

ETA: dogs in rescues around LA are always $250~400... though to $350 is the average "top" and $400 is kinda cutting it close...
 
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#5
Does the bait dog thing really happen? I see people talking about it a lot, but does anyone/any organization track that? (Just curious, not trying to be snarky.)
 

lancerandrara

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#6
Does the bait dog thing really happen? I see people talking about it a lot, but does anyone/any organization track that? (Just curious, not trying to be snarky.)
I feel like a lot of it depends on your location. I know that there are constantly dog fighting rings getting busted in and around LA though... it's sketchy and gross here. And not that every "free dog" will go to a dog fighter, but I know that they're always on the lookout. Usually through craigslist ads.

Basically for bait, they need a pet dog who is passive and won't fight back. Bait dogs' teeth are sanded down to stumps so that if they DO fight back, they won't injure the dog being "trained". And dog fighters aren't exactly wealthy, so where else to best get a cheap, mild dog than "free dogs for adoption".

Not sure about who tracks WHERE exactly the "free dogs" go though. :s I bet if it were tracked more carefully, many more dog fighters would be caught.
 

yv0nne

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#7
One night a guy tore me a new one on here saying bait dogs didn't exist and there were no cases of it. Ever. In the world. It didn't happen and we were fools for thinking it did.
 

lancerandrara

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#8
One night a guy tore me a new one on here saying bait dogs didn't exist and there were no cases of it. Sevensins maybe? He was a dick about it all.
No cases? Does he live on Mars? LOL

I read a rescue volunteer's story a couple years ago on how a bait dog approached her house by itself... a pittie clearly used as a bait dog, multiple bite wounds on the face, all teeth sanded down to stumps, and extremely aggressive towards other dogs. The woman ended up taking the dog in, because she was a giant lovebug towards people. I can't remember at ALL where I read this account though... gah.
 
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#9
I think it is perfectly fine for rescues to charge more for puppies and purebreds. They are much more adoptable and usually get placed quicker than most other dogs, so the rescues can use their adoption fees to pay for the long-term care of the dogs that stay with them longer. We once had a 12 year-old terrier mix in rescue that we spent over $1000 in medical bills on, but she was adopted for half of what the usual adoption fee is. The younger dogs help pay for medical bills for dogs like that.

As far as placing dogs with medical problems, I think it should be a case-by-case basis. If it is an old dog with terminal cancer, then I would be for putting it to sleep, but if it is a young dog that needs an amputation, or a single surgery, then I think they should be placed. At the rescue I volunteer for, we have a medical fund that we only break into for dogs that need special medical care. There is a fundraiser for it every year (we made almost $15,000 this year! :D), so it does not take away funds from the basic care of the other dogs. And for dogs with behavior issues, I believe that it should also be a case-by-case basis. The people who work at the rescue know the dogs best, and are able to determine whether or not a dog is safe to place.
 

Ozfozz

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#10
Our adoption fees are as follows:
Dogs (0-6 years): $345.00
Dogs (7+ years): $172.50
Cats (all ages): $100.00

How do you feel about charging higher rates for purebred dogs in rescue than for mixed breeds in rescue?
If we're speaking in terms of a well-bred purebred that was returned to the breeder and the rescue is helping place it, sure why not charge a bit more?

But for a dog that they deem purebred, or the owner claims is purebred, with no knowledge of the breeder, the health clearances that the parents went through etc.? I don't see the need to charge more.

What about more for puppies than adults?
I can understand charging more for puppies just because they often require a lot more work - more shots, spay/neuter, work to ensure they don't get parvo etc.

Should dogs being placed with behavioral issues be less money, since that person now has to pay for training to work on said behavioral issues?
The rescue I work with includes an 8 week behaviour course as a part of the adoption. This is to address and assist with any issues the owner may be having with the dog.
I don't necessarily think that the fee should be lowered as that might encourage the wrong type of person to take the dog on. Someone looking for the cheapest option opposed to the best option for them.

THAT SAID I would have totally been okay with the shelter lowering Rigby's fee ;)

What about medical issues? Should these dogs even BE placed?
Again, my rescue will provide monetary support for a dog with chronic medical issues. If they didn't, I would expect a basic set up for the ill dog (few months supply of medication or whatever the dog may need).
If the issue is too severe - ie low quality of life, then no I don't believe the dogs should be placed. Same goes for behavioural issues.
 

Kat09Tails

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#11
It depends. I am ok with truthfully surrendered dogs being placed at whatever price they want.

What I am not ok with is rescues buying dogs from bunchers in California/Missouri and then reselling them across state lines for hundreds more while they euthanize the less desirable locally. One of the local places last year imported a bunch of "rescue" pugs and chihuahua puppies last year and was hawking them at $700 each. There is a line between rescue and pet shop.
 

maxfox426

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#12
How do you feel about charging higher rates for purebred dogs in rescue than for mixed breeds in rescue?
I think it depends a little. If they are all being lumped together in one shelter, I doubt that I would expect a difference in price. They all need homes equally at that point, who cares if someone has a breed preference? Purebred or no, it's another pet going home. Why bother discouraging someone from adopting that animal out by jacking up the price?

However, if it was a breed-specific rescue, I probably would anticipate the adoption price being higher than that of the "regular" rescue shelter. Not that I have any experience, but that's just my gut response.

What about more for puppies than adults?
This makes sense to me. Our local shelter has a higher adoption price for puppies/kittens under 5mos. Then a standard adult rate, and finally a discounted rate for seniors 7+ years old. I do think it tends to make at least some people stop and think before taking a baby animal on impulse. Also, I think it subtly emphasizes to potential adopters that the older ones deserve a home just as much, if not more.

Should dogs being placed with behavioral issues be less money, since that person now has to pay for training to work on said behavioral issues?
Our shelter does not discount for behavioral issues in the adoption rate, BUT they offer behavior specialists and free/cheap training classes (depending on the level) at their facility for the dogs they adopt out. Honestly, I think that's a pretty ingenious solution. Granted, depending on the severity of the issue, there are certainly cases that probably shouldn't be eligible for adoption. And I'm also aware that not every rescue has the resources for this type of option. And in that case... I'm still not sure that discounting the price is the right idea. I don't think it should be "easier" to adopt out an animal that needs extra work. That's a tough line to draw, though.

What about medical issues? Should these dogs even BE placed?
I think this depends on the situation and the quality of life associated with the condition.

Sad though it is, I do not believe it makes much sense for a rescue to invest heaps of time and funds into an animal with a terminal diagnosis. Although it's a nice thought that a pet should have a home for it's last days, that time/energy/etc. could be better spent towards animals with manageable conditions.
 
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#13
Our shelter charges $125 across the board if you come there. For dogs going going on transport to VT, it ranges from 200-450 depending on age and desirability. That said, Quid is going for less then that due to his issues and the lack of interest in him.

The higher fees do make money for the shelter, but they also cover gas, hotel room, food, etc for the people going
 
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#14
The shelter I volunteer at charges $95 for dogs of all ages. We are in a rural area so I think that influences it.

A shelter in a near by city will charge anywhere from $25-$600 dollars depending on size, age and breed.
 

monkeys23

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#15
Honestly, more likely to take in another free dog from previous owners at this point than buy a dog from a shelter/rescue. It would have to be something really, really special for me to jump through all the rescue hoops and pay the big fees. I have seen a few dogs in rescue I'd be willing to do it for, but its not time yet and they found great homes. I would very much like to just save up to buy a puppy from a breeder or get a young adult breeder rehome, but then I have specific goals and want specific things.

There is one breed specific rescue locally that I think has very fair adoption prices. I definitely prefer the shelters/rescues that have one set price across the board with discounts for senior dogs.

I'm against jacking up prices for puppies and purebreds. I feel it is unethical. Granted I live with a dog for whom I am her third and final home. Her first owner paid that rescue bank for this hoarding bust GSD puppy and ... yeah I'm sorry it was very unethical in my opinion. Especially when everyone knew most of the adults were pts for temperament and more than one pup came back to be pts as an adult. Scout is very normal compared to quite a few of her relatives and she will never be normal. It was unethical for them to charge her first owner that much to adopt her.

I don't think it is fair to people who may have dreamed their whole lives to have a certain type of dog and are on a modest budget that would be better suited to having a couple hundred to spend on toys, crate, good food, etc. with a more modest $50/70 adoption fee. Just because people don't have ridiculous amounts of cash to throw around doesn't mean they are poor owners. I know a lot of people on modest budgets that are excellent owners... most of them found on the street or were given their dogs by someone who couldn't keep them.

I let the gal who adopted my independent foster set the price of his adoption. It was half of what I spent on caring for him and I still feel a little weird about taking that much money despite the fact that it was an enormous boon to us. It was still less than what many rescues and shelters are charging these days judging by this thread...
 
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#16
Honestly I'm fine with shelters running themselves as a business as far as setting costs goes with regard to supply and demand as their local area allows. They have operating costs just like any other business does, and I don't see it as more or less noble to have one fee or low fees.
 

JacksonsMom

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#17
I don't mind too much. I have read/heard from people involved in rescue that those higher fees for the younger more adoptable dogs help pay for the older dogs medical bills, etc. You know most people aren't going to be paying $400+ for a 6 year old dog with... diabetes or something. But if you can charge $400 for a healthy 6 month old sought after puppy and re-coup the costs of the older dog you spent a lot of money on, but only adopted out for... say $85 or something, then yeah, to me it makes sense.
 

joce

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#18
Of course different prices make sense!!

The rescue I fostered for did not focus on highly adoptable dogs like many do( when I say this I mean they only take in small breeds or purebreed dogs, we took them all). So say in general ten dogs in rescuethat month(really could have been 70- many many more) and just feed cost is pricey and only two or three may get adopted because again general old black dogs. And we get in several they all need fixed, heartworm, usually one bit by car etc. so just to move dogs and get into good homes we lower or drop fees. It's a money pit.

So when we get in highly adoptable dogs yes they have a higher price. I do not in any way shape or form see anything wrong with it. Highest I ever saw was I think 300 for a very young havaneese. Even puppies were only around 75-100 generally.

I do laugh at the rescues wanting 400 for every dog because hey need to realize it is not somethig they will make money in or even break even and I would not expect someone to five 400 for a twelve year old golden.
 

Ozfozz

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#19
Sad though it is, I do not believe it makes much sense for a rescue to invest heaps of time and funds into an animal with a terminal diagnosis. Although it's a nice thought that a pet should have a home for it's last days, that time/energy/etc. could be better spent towards animals with manageable conditions.
^^^ I agree with this.
I see it all the time where people are jumping to invest a pile of money into a single "sob story" dog that may or may not benefit from a treatment. When that amount of money could have been used to save 3+ other dogs that were otherwise healthy.

I understand wanting to do everything in your power to save every dog. But sometimes a sacrifice for the greater good is the better answer...
 

crazedACD

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#20
It depends. I am ok with truthfully surrendered dogs being placed at whatever price they want.

What I am not ok with is rescues buying dogs from bunchers in California/Missouri and then reselling them across state lines for hundreds more while they euthanize the less desirable locally. One of the local places last year imported a bunch of "rescue" pugs and chihuahua puppies last year and was hawking them at $700 each. There is a line between rescue and pet shop.
Rescues need to be investigated for this. I know it happens in New England.

^^^ I agree with this.
I see it all the time where people are jumping to invest a pile of money into a single "sob story" dog that may or may not benefit from a treatment. When that amount of money could have been used to save 3+ other dogs that were otherwise healthy.

I understand wanting to do everything in your power to save every dog. But sometimes a sacrifice for the greater good is the better answer...
Well...a sob story or two is good for gleaning donations. People don't donate as much if there isn't a "good" cause. I don't see too much wrong with that I guess as long as the dog isn't suffering unnecessarily.
 

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