Little Question

Vega

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#1
Just a little silly question, my canine companion sleeps in the garage every night.
Does it matter whether I leave the lights on or off? What would they prefer as canines? I don't know, I just kinda feel a litte bad when I turn off the light and see her looking at me with her doggie face, lol.
:)
 
M

Manchesters

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#2
Inside

Vega said:
Just a little silly question, my canine companion sleeps in the garage every night.
Does it matter whether I leave the lights on or off? What would they prefer as canines? I don't know, I just kinda feel a litte bad when I turn off the light and see her looking at me with her doggie face, lol.
:)
She should be sleeping in the house with you. Would you make a two year old human child sleep in the garage? Same thing! Why do you force her to be separated from you?
 

Doberluv

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#3
I don't know, I just kinda feel a litte bad when I turn off the light and see her looking at me with her doggie face, lol.
I agree. I wouldn't worry about turning on lights. She's looking at you, not on account of not liking the dark, but on account of being seperated from her "pack." Dogs have an intense desire to be with their families. They have this inherent need to be in numbers, protecting eachother etc. Of course, sometimes they have to be seperated and that's OK...like during some hours during the day but when you ARE at home, it's always best to try to include your dog, making him feel part of the family. If you're a child and this is up to your parents, maybe you can convince them to let the dog be near you at night.
 

Angelique

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#4
Yes, I also agree. Although some time alone is OK for a dog, (in order to be comfortable with "alone-time" without developing separation anxiety type problems), your dog will be better bonded with you and your family, if they sleep closer to the rest of their "pack", or family members.

A more closely bonded dog is usually more apt to listen to direction from you when in a training session, and this can also help reduce behavior problems down the road. I feel social isolation is a very preventable cause of many behavior problems. :)
 

Vega

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#5
Manchesters said:
She should be sleeping in the house with you. Would you make a two year old human child sleep in the garage? Same thing! Why do you force her to be separated from you?
Flaw in your reasoning, a human child is not equivalent to a canine.

She sleeps in the garage/little hallway because of the other occupants desire to live in an immaculate house. We have marble flooring, valuable statues/trinkets/miscellaneous items and European furniture. So they are worried of damage to the possessions. In addition, she is a heavy shedder. Black hair is all over the garage and the little hallway in the house. We have to vacuum everyday to keep it clean. I fully understand a domestic canine’s desire to be close to the “pack.” However certain circumstances prevent me from allowing her to be close to us. She is given a lot of freedom, free to roam around in a 5000 sq ft. property anytime. I’m planning to switch rooms with the Exercise room which is where the little hallway is located next to as a means of being closer to her. Oddly, no one has answered my question.
 

Doberluv

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#6
Oddly, no one has answered my question.

Was this your question?

Does it matter whether I leave the lights on or off? What would they prefer as canines?
Is this not an answer?

I wouldn't worry about turning on lights.
I guess I could elaborate my opinion. I don't think your dog will need to have lights on. They sleep just great in the dark and can see well in dark too....if they need to.
 
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Whitedobelover

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#7
i agree with doberluv... but i also understand what you are saying about expensive stuff. however people with rascals should think about this before they buy a dog... or before they buy expensive stguff dogs acan chew on or knock over... so i guess what they are saying is you probably should think about buying expensive breakables.....

anyway i also agree with doberluv... she is right... no l ight is okay... she is just oging to lie down... with the light on she will wanna play
 

Vega

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#8
Whitedobelover said:
i agree with doberluv... but i also understand what you are saying about expensive stuff. however people with rascals should think about this before they buy a dog... or before they buy expensive stguff dogs acan chew on or knock over... so i guess what they are saying is you probably should think about buying expensive breakables.....
The items where here before we adopted the dog from a kill shelter. I've bought her a lot of toys, as a result we don't have a chewing problem as the previous adopters had.

Doberluv said:
I guess I could elaborate my opinion. I don't think your dog will need to have lights on. They sleep just great in the dark and can see well in dark too....if they need to.
Thanks.
 

showpug

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#9
Vega said:
Flaw in your reasoning, a human child is not equivalent to a canine.

She sleeps in the garage/little hallway because of the other occupants desire to live in an immaculate house. We have marble flooring, valuable statues/trinkets/miscellaneous items and European furniture. So they are worried of damage to the possessions. In addition, she is a heavy shedder. Black hair is all over the garage and the little hallway in the house. We have to vacuum everyday to keep it clean. I fully understand a domestic canine’s desire to be close to the “pack.” However certain circumstances prevent me from allowing her to be close to us. She is given a lot of freedom, free to roam around in a 5000 sq ft. property anytime. I’m planning to switch rooms with the Exercise room which is where the little hallway is located next to as a means of being closer to her. Oddly, no one has answered my question.
Dogs don't care about the light being left on or off, they are not afraid of the dark like we humans :rolleyes: There really was no flaw in Manchester's reasoning because to a lot of the members on here, a dog is equivalent to a 2 year old child, especially if you have dedicated a lot of your life to raising, caring for and adoring your dogs like she has.
 
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Manchesters

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#10
Sorry My Dear,

Vega said:
Flaw in your reasoning, a human child is not equivalent to a canine.

She sleeps in the garage/little hallway because of the other occupants desire to live in an immaculate house. We have marble flooring, valuable statues/trinkets/miscellaneous items and European furniture. So they are worried of damage to the possessions. In addition, she is a heavy shedder. Black hair is all over the garage and the little hallway in the house. We have to vacuum everyday to keep it clean. I fully understand a domestic canine’s desire to be close to the “pack.” However certain circumstances prevent me from allowing her to be close to us. She is given a lot of freedom, free to roam around in a 5000 sq ft. property anytime. I’m planning to switch rooms with the Exercise room which is where the little hallway is located next to as a means of being closer to her. Oddly, no one has answered my question.
But there is no flaw in my reasoning. Having a dog is exactly the same responsibility as having a child......If your "roommates" are worried, put the crapola up out of reach of the dog. And vacuum the dog--that will take care of the shedding. Marble floors are no problem. I forgot---did you say in the original post that you leave a radio on for her? Sure hope so.

You may have saved her body from a no kill shelter, but there are other ways to kill a dog---like emotionally. You really should not have a dog. I hope to heaven none of ya'll ever have a kid!! (Two legged variety, that is.) I think in this case YOU are the one who needs to see the light!!!!!!!!
 

Vega

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#11
showpug said:
There really was no flaw in Manchester's reasoning because to a lot of the members on here, a dog is equivalent to a 2 year old child, especially if you have dedicated a lot of your life to raising, caring for and adoring your dogs like she has.


Pick who lives, a canines life or a humans life?

Is a hamster the equivalent to a humans life? On what basis do you judge what creature is equal in value?
 
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#12
I agree that she should be a part of the family. Have you considered a crate or exercise pen to contain her in during the night? You can put in your room.
But I don't think we need to go as far as to say he/she shouldn't have a dog because she got annoyed.
EDIT: Why is this turning into an argument? All we've done is answer your question!
 

Vega

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#13
Manchesters said:
But there is no flaw in my reasoning. Having a dog is exactly the same responsibility as having a child......If your "roommates" are worried, put the crapola up out of reach of the dog. And vacuum the dog--that will take care of the shedding. Marble floors are no problem. I forgot---did you say in the original post that you leave a radio on for her? Sure hope so.
false, owning a dog is similar to having a child but not identical. We do vacuum; she still sheds all over the place at an astounding level. We take her to professional groomers and do it your self puppy baths twice a week. The groomers are amazed at how much she sheds. I never stated she listens to the radio but the answer is yes, she listens to classical music.

Manchesters said:
You may have saved her body from a no kill shelter, but there are other ways to kill a dog---like emotionally. You really should not have a dog. I hope to heaven none of ya'll ever have a kid!! (Two legged variety, that is.) I think in this case YOU are the one who needs to see the light!!!!!!!!
Because you have a particular view does not make it correct or make my view wrong. No she is not "emotionally dying."
 
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Manchesters

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#14
I Said

gaddylovesdogs said:
I agree that she should be a part of the family. Have you considered a crate or exercise pen to contain her in during the night? You can put in your room.
But I don't think we need to go as far as to say he/she shouldn't have a dog because she got annoyed.
EDIT: Why is this turning into an argument? All we've done is answer your question!
She shouldn't have a dog because she is unable to give a dog what it deserves. What is the point of getting a dog if it cannot be in the house with its owner? If it were I, __I__ would move out into the garage with the dog. The others could have their fancy house.

You know, there are little rich kids that are raised like this, and they turn out to be delinquents! Not everyone's lifestyle is ideal for having dogs, or kids.

No arguing.....stating facts. Getting a pet involves responsibility to give that pet the best of everything it needs---physcially, and also emotionally. That of course is simply my opinion. Anyone who thinks I am full of crapola is certainly entitled to that opinion, and I won't even get bent out of shape if they tell me so!!

And if anyone watched the Show Dog Moms and Dads, and saw that couple with the German Shepherds and the Pharoah Hound, there can't be any richer, fancier house than what they had!!!!! Marble floor to ceiling, ritzy, posh possessions, and all those dogs living right in the middle of it all. Of course those people are filthy rich. That helps, I guess.
 

panzer426

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I agree so far, first let me say this...lights on or off? doesnt matter at all. sleeping in the garage? that is a huge deal. is there anything besides the dogs stuff in that garage? are there any tools she could knock over and hurt herself on? is there a lawn mower? she could get a toy under there and slice her toe or nose on a blade. do cars EVER get parked in the garage? I dont care how much you paid for the cars or how often you have them tuned up, every car, truck, tractor, airplane, motorbike, lawn mower etc leaks oil, antifreeze and other fluids. is the garage climate controlled? if not then how hot does it get in there in the summer? how cold in the winter? how much time does she spend in the garage alone each day and night? just 8 hours or so like many dogs who live in the house or is it 8 hours a day and then another 8 hours each night? why did you get a dog if it cant be in the house? she has lots of toys and now she doesnt chew things? lots of dogs who live their entire lives in a back yard have lots of toys too, quite a few of them even have a couple other dogs to play with but they are still extremely bored. wether YOU think of a dog as a 2-3 year old child or not isnt a big deal but they DO have the mental capacity of a 2 year old and need a lot of mental stimulation, love, comfort, companionship from their owner, training and socialization. living in a garage and being able to run around a 5,000 square foot peice of property means absolutely nothing. she is not getting excercise on that property if she is roaming it alone, she needs you. if you cant provide for her in EVERY way, not just vet care, food and toys then you should do the right thing and find her a better home.
 
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Manchesters

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Glad

Vega said:
false, owning a dog is similar to having a child but not identical. We do vacuum; she still sheds all over the place at an astounding level. We take her to professional groomers and do it your self puppy baths twice a week. The groomers are amazed at how much she sheds. I never stated she listens to the radio but the answer is yes, she listens to classical music.



Because you have a particular view does not make it true. No she is not "emotionally dying."
You didn't get put off by what I said. I was a bit huffy. Should not have been. You can get a dog like that clipped you know. Something like a 5 blade on the body, and scissor the legs and tail. Makes it easier to brush. Oh, and if you could find my post on how to properly brush a dog from the skin out, with a slicker, there wouldn't be any hair to shed! It takes time, but would only need to be done maybe 4 times a year if she is clipped for the summer.

But as I said above, I would move out to the garage, and to Hades with the other fuss pots. Let them have their precious emmaculate house!!!!!! Phooey to them!!

And yes, dogs that have been abused, and are shut off from their owners DO die emotionally. They sure don't flourish!!! But that is a moot point here. Is there a possiblity that a change of diet might also help reduce the shedding? Or adding some vitamin E in her food?

And if it were I, the dog would have at least a 13 inch TV out there with her. It would provide light, human sounds, and even some motion if she were interested in "watching" it. I have a T.M. that sits on my shoulder and watches the movement of the light on the TV. Can't say she gets particularly engrossed in the programs. Only had 1 Dobe that actually WATCHED Tv.

Again, sorry for sounding so snipey. I just don't believe in "outside" dogs. Never sold to such a household, and like the majority of dedicated dog people, I am vehemently against the whole idea. Not that I am opinionated, or anything, roflolololol.
 

Vega

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#17
Manchesters said:
She shouldn't have a dog because she is unable to give a dog what it deserves. What is the point of getting a dog if it cannot be in the house with its owner? If it were I, __I__ would move out into the garage with the dog. The others could have their fancy house.
I have witness canines living happily with their owners and they are outdoor dogs. What’s the point of having a cat when it can run away anytime it wants to?

Manchesters said:
You know, there are little rich kids that are raised like this, and they turn out to be delinquents! Not everyone's lifestyle is ideal for having dogs, or kids.
You're simply commenting and not providing facts, your argument is baseless. This is nothing more then an ad hominem.

Manchesters said:
No arguing.....stating facts. Getting a pet involves responsibility to give that pet the best of everything it needs---physcially, and also emotionally. That of course is simply my opinion. Anyone who thinks I am full of crapola is certainly entitled to that opinion, and I won't even get bent out of shape if they tell me so!!
You’re stating personal opinions rather then facts.

Manchesters said:
And if anyone watched the Show Dog Moms and Dads, and saw that couple with the German Shepherds and the Pharoah Hound, there can't be any richer, fancier house than what they had!!!!! Marble floor to ceiling, ritzy, posh possessions, and all those dogs living right in the middle of it all. Of course those people are filthy rich. That helps, I guess.
Yet you fail to understand I must come to an agreement with the other occupants rather then having complete power on the decision.

Manchesters said:
You didn't get put off by what I said. I was a bit huffy. Should not have been. You can get a dog like that clipped you know. Something like a 5 blade on the body, and scissor the legs and tail. Makes it easier to brush. Oh, and if you could find my post on how to properly brush a dog from the skin out, with a slicker, there wouldn't be any hair to shed! It takes time, but would only need to be done maybe 4 times a year if she is clipped for the summer.

But as I said above, I would move out to the garage, and to Hades with the other fuss pots. Let them have their precious emmaculate house!!!!!! Phooey to them!!

And yes, dogs that have been abused, and are shut off from their owners DO die emotionally. They sure don't flourish!!! But that is a moot point here. Is there a possiblity that a change of diet might also help reduce the shedding? Or adding some vitamin E in her food?

And if it were I, the dog would have at least a 13 inch TV out there with her. It would provide light, human sounds, and even some motion if she were interested in "watching" it. I have a T.M. that sits on my shoulder and watches the movement of the light on the TV. Can't say she gets particularly engrossed in the programs. Only had 1 Dobe that actually WATCHED Tv.

Again, sorry for sounding so snipey. I just don't believe in "outside" dogs. Never sold to such a household, and like the majority of dedicated dog people, I am vehemently against the whole idea. Not that I am opinionated, or anything, roflolololol.
I’m planning to move into the room next to the garage.
 
M

Manchesters

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#18
Vega said:
I have witness canines living happily with their owners and they are outdoor dogs. What’s the point of having a cat when it can run away anytime it wants to?



You're simply commenting and not providing facts, your argument is baseless. This is nothing more then an ad hominem.



You’re stating personal opinions rather then facts.



Yet you fail to understand I must come to an agreement with the other occupants rather then having complete power on the decision.



I’m planning to move into the room next to the garage.
What you have failed to realize is that my opinions and Ad hominums are based upon facts..........facts gleaned from living in constant physical contact with dogs for 30+ years. And yes, I said that I would move into the garage, and let the other occupants have their nice clean house! So yeah, I realize you don't have completele autonomy in this instance. And again, as I said.....phooey on them! Bunch of fuss pots!

What is with having a cat that can run away anytime it wants to?? Most people I know, their cats are inside animals. Of course, their cats are $4000-$5000 fur balls, lol.

So what about the TV??? And if you move into the room next to the garage, can she be in that room with you? That way she wouldn't have to traipse thru the house.

Lordy, I am so glad I do not have to cowtow to any other human being!!!!!!!! My home is my own, and my dogs. Well, actually, the house is the DOGS, and they keep me around to cater to their every need, heheheheheh! And that ain't no lie!!!!!!
 

Vega

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#19
panzer426 said:
I agree so far, first let me say this...lights on or off? doesnt matter at all. sleeping in the garage? that is a huge deal. is there anything besides the dogs stuff in that garage? are there any tools she could knock over and hurt herself on? is there a lawn mower? she could get a toy under there and slice her toe or nose on a blade. do cars EVER get parked in the garage? I dont care how much you paid for the cars or how often you have them tuned up, every car, truck, tractor, airplane, motorbike, lawn mower etc leaks oil, antifreeze and other fluids. is the garage climate controlled? if not then how hot does it get in there in the summer? how cold in the winter? how much time does she spend in the garage alone each day and night? just 8 hours or so like many dogs who live in the house or is it 8 hours a day and then another 8 hours each night? why did you get a dog if it cant be in the house? she has lots of toys and now she doesnt chew things? lots of dogs who live their entire lives in a back yard have lots of toys too, quite a few of them even have a couple other dogs to play with but they are still extremely bored. wether YOU think of a dog as a 2-3 year old child or not isnt a big deal but they DO have the mental capacity of a 2 year old and need a lot of mental stimulation, love, comfort, companionship from their owner, training and socialization. living in a garage and being able to run around a 5,000 square foot peice of property means absolutely nothing. she is not getting excercise on that property if she is roaming it alone, she needs you. if you cant provide for her in EVERY way, not just vet care, food and toys then you should do the right thing and find her a better home.

You assume:

1. I dont exercise her
2. I dont spend time with her
3. She is living in a hazard area.

Assumptions.
 

panzer426

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#20
assumptions??? nope not at all. those were questions. see in the english language there is a symbol we use to signify that something is a question rather than a statement, it is this one (?) so instead of getting upset about it, why not answer them?
what abut cats being able to run away??? where did that come from? well, my wife has a cat that we adopted for $25 from a shelter, he lives in the house and the only time he goes outside is in his crate to go to the vet. we also have 2 dogs, a gsd and a australian cattle dog mix who both live inside. if for any reason I couldnt keep them inside I would not even consider adopting an animal.
 

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