FutureDog (Ibizan, Lab, Curly...?)

*blackrose

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#1
I've been giving a lot of thought to future things recently and one of those things is what breed I want next (of course). Our living arrangement will be changing, with any luck we'll be adding a human addition, our job situations will be changing...and what I want out of a dog is also going to be a much different scenario than what I wanted when I purchased Abrams. I am NOT planning on adding another dog until we've moved, gotten settled, and feel I can handle a new pup plus the baby (or toddler, by that time, with any luck), but I can't help but turn my eye at different breeds and wonder what would be the best fit!

There are a lot of different things that I'm taking in to consideration, but these are some points that I view close to being my ideal:

- 40-60 pounds, moderately sized
- short/double coat, low-moderate shedding (already have two heavy shedders, though, so what's one more...)
- wash and wear OR can be shaved monthly to be wash and wear
- politely reserved with strangers in public, but NOT fearful, aggressive, or otherwise protective
- reserved/friendly with visitors at the house (watch dog is okay, guard dog is NOT - I only want one protective dog at a time and Abrams is currently filling that role very well)
- great with kids (aka, will handle baby noises/flailing/weird handling/running and screaming/etc. with aplomb)
- active and engaging outdoors, but more than happy to sleep the day away indoors
- athletic, able to handle high temperatures, could go on whatever hiking or otherwise outdoorsy adventures we care to go on
- food motivated, willingness to engage and focus while training
- ideally physically playful (with humans and other dogs), but also would be okay with low toy drive (thanks to Abrams being a poor sport about sharing toys with equally greedy dogs)
- good with other dogs (no tendency for combativeness)
- good with household animals (ignores and/or enjoys the cats and caged animals)
- not abnormally barky/talkative
- love of water is a +++
- ability to be off lead is a +++++++++! Would accept a dog that needs to be on a long line in highly engaging environments, but would greatly prefer a dog that can be trusted off lead in an isolated/home environment. This isn't a deal breaker, but it is really the one thing holding me back from jumping on the sighthound bandwagon.

I like animated, happy dogs. Ones that will turn serious when the situation calls for it, but are more than happy to engage and be silly in day to day interactions. But I also want a dog that understands silly and happy needs to have a limit, and that quiet time in the house is expected.

I will more than likely be sticking with what I know and going with a petite female Labrador as my next dog. But, I want to make sure there isn't another breed or type of dog that I may be over looking that would be a better fit.

A retired racing Greyhound has piqued my interest, as have Ibizan Hounds. Curly Coats are also back on my radar (as a more polite, reserved retriever vs the I-love-everyone of a Labrador or the protectiveness of a Chessie), but I don't know as much about them as I do the other retriever breeds.

I know we have some Ibizan people here and I'd love to hear more about the breed. And if anyone has any insights on Curly's, too, that would be awesome.
 

SizzleDog

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#2
There are a lot of different things that I'm taking in to consideration, but these are some points that I view close to being my ideal:

- 40-60 pounds, moderately sized
- short/double coat, low-moderate shedding (already have two heavy shedders, though, so what's one more...)
- wash and wear
- politely reserved with strangers in public, but NOT fearful, aggressive, or otherwise protective
- reserved/friendly with visitors at the house
- great with kids (aka, will handle baby noises/flailing/weird handling/running and screaming/etc. with aplomb)
- active and engaging outdoors, but more than happy to sleep the day away indoors
- athletic, able to handle high temperatures, could go on whatever hiking or otherwise outdoorsy adventures we care to go on
- food motivated, willingness to engage and focus while training
- ideally physically playful (with humans and other dogs), but also would be okay with low toy drive (thanks to Abrams being a poor sport about sharing toys with equally greedy dogs)
- good with other dogs (no tendency for combativeness)
- good with household animals (ignores and/or enjoys the cats and caged animals)
- not abnormally barky/talkative
- love of water is a +++
- ability to be off lead is a +++++++++! Would accept a dog that needs to be on a long line in highly engaging environments, but would greatly prefer a dog that can be trusted off lead in an isolated/home environment. This isn't a deal breaker, but it is really the one thing holding me back from jumping on the sighthound bandwagon.
I've bolded the things that, IMO, most Ibizans possess. Beezers are really, really fun dogs. They're more than just sighthounds - they use all their senses to hunt, with some natural retrieve skills mixed in as well. (This is an interesting video showing how they hunt: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA2Ja7dJ78Y )

Now, I will say... my Ibizan hound is still a puppy, but I've been around a ton of adults. When properly exercised, they will settle in the house... but they need a ton of exercise. Mental exercise doesn't cut it. If it gives you any idea, at 15-16 weeks old Seren needed 4-6 miles of walking PER DAY if I wanted any sleep at night. Without it, she'd scream in her crate all night, and I'm not exaggerating. My breeder's adult dogs are relatively calm in the house, but they get 5-10 miles of exercise (biking and walking, plus 5 acres to run and hunt on) every day.

Also.... not a quiet breed. Perhaps some are, but the majority of the ones I've met are not afraid to use their voices loudly and often.

As for focus and engagement in training... they're not like your typical sporting or herding breed. They're still hounds, and still are kind of "houndy" to train. Don't get an Ibizan an expect the trainability of a lab. ;)

Offleash.... yes, it can be trained. Most Ibizan people use ecollars. The "hunt" hasn't been bred out of Ibizans, so remember you're dealing with a serious, driven, primitive hunting hound. They're not hardwired to hang out with the family when there's something better (i.e. hunting critters) to do.

Temperament-wise with people.... not exactly your stereotypical sighthound. Some are pretty aloof, but many are much more gregarious and outgoing than people would expect of a sighthound.

So basically, Ibizans are pretty cool hounds. For the most part, they get along and do great with people, cats (if raised with them), people, kids, etc. However, they're not for the faint of heart, and they're a lot more work than people probably expect them to be. Seren has been about 4x the work of a typical Doberman puppy, if that gives you any idea.
 

*blackrose

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#3
I've bolded the things that, IMO, most Ibizans possess. Beezers are really, really fun dogs. They're more than just sighthounds - they use all their senses to hunt, with some natural retrieve skills mixed in as well. (This is an interesting video showing how they hunt: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA2Ja7dJ78Y )

Now, I will say... my Ibizan hound is still a puppy, but I've been around a ton of adults. When properly exercised, they will settle in the house... but they need a ton of exercise. Mental exercise doesn't cut it. If it gives you any idea, at 15-16 weeks old Seren needed 4-6 miles of walking PER DAY if I wanted any sleep at night. Without it, she'd scream in her crate all night, and I'm not exaggerating. My breeder's adult dogs are relatively calm in the house, but they get 5-10 miles of exercise (biking and walking, plus 5 acres to run and hunt on) every day.

Also.... not a quiet breed. Perhaps some are, but the majority of the ones I've met are not afraid to use their voices loudly and often.

As for focus and engagement in training... they're not like your typical sporting or herding breed. They're still hounds, and still are kind of "houndy" to train. Don't get an Ibizan an expect the trainability of a lab. ;)

Offleash.... yes, it can be trained. Most Ibizan people use ecollars. The "hunt" hasn't been bred out of Ibizans, so remember you're dealing with a serious, driven, primitive hunting hound. They're not hardwired to hang out with the family when there's something better (i.e. hunting critters) to do.

Temperament-wise with people.... not exactly your stereotypical sighthound. Some are pretty aloof, but many are much more gregarious and outgoing than people would expect of a sighthound.

So basically, Ibizans are pretty cool hounds. For the most part, they get along and do great with people, cats (if raised with them), people, kids, etc. However, they're not for the faint of heart, and they're a lot more work than people probably expect them to be. Seren has been about 4x the work of a typical Doberman puppy, if that gives you any idea.
THANK YOU! They sound very interesting, too be sure! I'm not going to scratch them off the list entirely, but for now, at least, knowing that they require so much physical exercise is going to be the deal breaker. Unless our living arrangements change to where there is a safe place to bike, I know right now I'll likely not want to walk or run for miles daily to have a sane dog. A brisk two mile walk daily, playtime in the yard, and some mental exercise via training sessions and food puzzles is about my cap for activity. I don't honestly see that changing. I do know I really enjoy biking with dogs, but unless our home will be rural I won't pursue it, because I'm not comfortable doing it on main roads.
 

SoCrafty

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#4
I really want to say Smooth Collie. I know they weren't on the list, but you should check them out. They match a lot of things on your list, and are more active than the Rough. They are a little more barky than your average dog, but that can be helped with some training - but it won't eliminate it. The Rough Collie we had in our puppy class had really good energy and she was a quick learner.

You have some health issues in the breed, but they can be tested for. Much like Shelties, a lot of socialization and early will help, but they are generally reserved with strangers by default. Most are great with kids.
 

busannie

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#6
I know only one curly coated retriever, and see him a few times a year through work. He's a neat dog, and their coats are also pretty cool, though I've noticed his has gotten more toward the coarser "poodle" type coat than the smooth, curly coat he had when he was young (he is neutered, so that may have some affect on coat?). He's a pretty big dog, 90 lbs or so, average pet condition. Super nice, always happy to meet people, but polite enough that if you really don't want bothered, he accepts that. I've only seen good behavior with other dogs, and I know he goes to dog daycare and a local dog park, so I assume he's quite tolerant. Not sure about water, but I think I remember his owner telling me once he likes water.

He seems smart and biddable, his owner is hearing impaired and uses hand signals a lot, so he's always vaguely focused on her even while he's socializing. Not sure how he is on the exercise front, but he's never crazy hyper or out of control, just a nice pet temperament (whereas most labs we see are nice enough dogs, but rate high on the spaz spectrum, lol). How much of that is training and/or exercise by the owner, I don't know, but I don't think she's putting in a crazy amount of effort or time on either. I've never seen any protective or defensive behavior, but I've never seen him in a situation that would have warranted it, so really can't say. I'm not really a retriever person, but if I were, I might be tempted to look into them more.
 

*blackrose

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#7
Smooth Collie would be an option, but I tend to gravitate towards sporting-type breeds rather than herding breeds. I have no idea why. Lol

A Barbet is an interesting option, but I would definitely have to shave it short. I do not care for floof. At all. I think I'd rather stick with a breed that is a bit more popular, as well, just for ease of finding a breeder/pup I'm happy with.

Busannie, thanks for the insight on your experience with a Curly! They definitely intrigue me. I had spoke with a breeder before I purchased Abrams and ultimately decided that they seemed a bit too soft/quiet for what I wanted at the time, but now that seems rather appealing. Lol
 

milos_mommy

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#8
Greyhound was my thought until the off leash part, I also know some can be a little sensitive with toddlers and I've heard they can be prone to snapping when disturbed from sleep? But I'm sure you could find one Tha is fond of kids.

Springer spaniel pretty much fits everything, especially a bigger one.

Staffy, but that might be on the small side, and they're usually pretty friendly in public. We get a lot of pit bull rescues that fit all that perfectly (aside being a little overly friendly with strangers/guests) but I think it will depend on your area and the lines there.
 

Elrohwen

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#9
I don't have any personal experience with curlies, but I do know a breeder who lives in Ohio if you're interested in getting in touch with her.
 

*blackrose

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#10
I think a Greyhound may be Michael and I's "compromise" dog, if it comes to that. He swears up and down we will never have another puppy, ever. I disagree. Lol But depending on how things work out at the time, I think a young, animated retired racer may be a good option. I don't think I'm going to pursue them as a first option, though, at this time. That may change. Who knows.

I'm definitely considering a spaniel breed, namely a field English Cocker or Brittany (although not a spaniel). But I know that I'm going to prefer a petite Retriever over another sporting breed....I'm just biased that way. Lol If a more smaller-medium sized dog would be best, however, I'll be looking at them with greater interest. (And again, I may be able to get DH on board with a Cynder look-alike than another big pup.)

Staffy, I'd be too worried about DA/animal aggression. I do love me some Staffies, though. Every one I've met has be awesome.

I don't have any personal experience with curlies, but I do know a breeder who lives in Ohio if you're interested in getting in touch with her.
That would be great! You can PM me then info, if you'd like. I can't remember who I spoke with a few years ago, but she was very helpful. I'd like to find her information again, but I'm turning up blank.
 

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