Looking for Breed Suggetions

bellylove

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#1
Hello!

I have a seven year old toy poodle mix, and I am looking to add a new furry member to the household. I currently live by myself but a family might be in the cards in the near future. I am looking for a breed that is content being indoors and watching tv (and can live in an apartment) but also enjoys daily runs. I live in South Texas so keep in mind the weather is extremely hot.

These are some of the breeds I had thought of and why I decided against them:

Dobermans: My favorite breed. I grew up with them. I love how they love to cuddle, go running for a few miles, then go back to watching TV. However they are in the "restrictive" breed list, and I do live in apartments.

Golden Retrievers/ Labs: I feel like they might not do so well indoors. Also, they tend to shed a lot.

Standard Poodles: I am really considering this. I am just not sure how well they'd do indoors.

I am also trying to stay away from petstores and craigslist. I am willing to adopt from the humane society or a reputable breeder. But I have no experience choosing breeders: any recommendations in Texas would be great.

Final question: how much do dogs from reputable breeders usually cost? We are planning to purchase the puppy towards the latter part of Spring 2017 so I'll have some time to save up money for the dog (and all the costs that come with having a puppy.)

Thank you! Any input is valuable & appreciated!
 

Doberluv

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#2
I love Dobermans too. My wonderful boy, Lyric died some years ago and I have only been on this forum here and there a little bit. Since then, I've acquired two toy poodles from a reputable breeder. And I'm loving this breed.

If you want a low energy dog, don't get a poodle, especially a standard. They need lots of exercise and lots of brain work.

I recommend you research what it means to be a reputable breeder. Google it and read some articles. There may even be something on this forum. Do a search. Look into what genetic health testing should be done on the breed you choose, what kinds of health problems that breed is prone to. Ask questions about longevity and the prevalence of diseases such as Addison's disease in the breeder's lines that can't be tested for. Make sure the breeder you use has proof of the health testing results by searching OFA for certain test results. Ask around. Go to shows and talk to people. I like a breeder who shows dogs...has some titles in conformation as well as things like agility or obedience, field trials... showing the dogs in the breeder's lines can do what they were bred to do. Talk to previous puppy buyers and see what they think. Do your research and get a good dog. They can vary in cost from one locale to another. But figure somewhere around $1,000 to $2,000. The initial cost is nothing compared to the ongoing cost of health problems that are more likely in poorly bred dogs where the breeder didn't test for anything. It's not always the case, of course, but over all, get the best dog you can.

If you want a dog that can get along on one good run a day and is happy lounging around a lot, a lot of people love to get a retired Greyhound. Or get a puppy from a breeder. They're suppose to be lovely in so many ways. Good luck and happy hunting.
 

bellylove

New Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
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Age
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#3
I love Dobermans too. My wonderful boy, Lyric died some years ago and I have only been on this forum here and there a little bit. Since then, I've acquired two toy poodles from a reputable breeder. And I'm loving this breed.

If you want a low energy dog, don't get a poodle, especially a standard. They need lots of exercise and lots of brain work.

I recommend you research what it means to be a reputable breeder. Google it and read some articles. There may even be something on this forum. Do a search. Look into what genetic health testing should be done on the breed you choose, what kinds of health problems that breed is prone to. Ask questions about longevity and the prevalence of diseases such as Addison's disease in the breeder's lines that can't be tested for. Make sure the breeder you use has proof of the health testing results by searching OFA for certain test results. Ask around. Go to shows and talk to people. I like a breeder who shows dogs...has some titles in conformation as well as things like agility or obedience, field trials... showing the dogs in the breeder's lines can do what they were bred to do. Talk to previous puppy buyers and see what they think. Do your research and get a good dog. They can vary in cost from one locale to another. But figure somewhere around $1,000 to $2,000. The initial cost is nothing compared to the ongoing cost of health problems that are more likely in poorly bred dogs where the breeder didn't test for anything. It's not always the case, of course, but over all, get the best dog you can.

If you want a dog that can get along on one good run a day and is happy lounging around a lot, a lot of people love to get a retired Greyhound. Or get a puppy from a breeder. They're suppose to be lovely in so many ways. Good luck and happy hunting.
Thank you for the input. I hadn't thought of Greyhounds before. I'll definitely take a look into those.

Thank you!
 

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