What breeds?

Catsi

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#22
My first dog breed book I bought at age 11 didn't have German Shorthaired Pointers in it. :eek: But I'm pretty sure that is quite unusual. The funny thing was the book had quite a few breeds, especially in the Gundog group that I did not recognise at all.
 

Pops2

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#23
accurate historical info, not myth
like the irish wolfhound is a recreation from the 1860s and is essentially a wirehaired dane

also identify working dogs as unsuitable for pet homes, don't sugar coat it w/ "can be difficult." say up front cur dogs (& hunting bred hounds, sighthounds terriers & working bred collies, gsds, mals heelers etc) are bred mostly for hunting &/or working rough livestock or PP and will develop behavior problems in most normal pet situations and so should only go to working homes.

show breeds that are not registered but are breeds like staghounds
also purposeful crosses like lurchers & bandogs
but again point out that they are NOT suited to the average pet home.
 

PlottMom

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#25
also identify working dogs as unsuitable for pet homes, don't sugar coat it w/ "can be difficult." say up front cur dogs (& hunting bred hounds, sighthounds terriers & working bred collies, gsds, mals heelers etc) are bred mostly for hunting &/or working rough livestock or PP and will develop behavior problems in most normal pet situations and so should only go to working homes.
have i been lied to all along?! i was under the impression mountain and/or treeing curs were pretty good all-purpose family/kid's squirrel hunting/dad's coon hunting dogs? hang out on the farm all day and sleep in front of the fireplace kind of dog?
 

Toller_08

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#27
I can't think of anything specific at this very moment that I'd want to see in a book, but if you need anything Toller related (be it info, photos, whatever), feel free to ask me. Sounds like a really cool project. :)
 

Pops2

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#28
plottmom
if you take most of the curs and stuck them in the backyard/kennel/on the chain, give them litle to no training, walk them around the block once or twice a month like most people do, you're going to create a problem by putting an intelligent, active dog into enforced inactivity & boredom. in short you are screwing that dog up and will have headaches out the wazoo. now this may be true of most dogs but the effect & results are far worse as the intelligence, intensity & enrgy levels move up the scale.
 

Paige

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#29
Zoom, if you ever need a photo of a less than ideal Border Collie I'd gladly get some nice photos of Bandit with his giant block head. :p Im the first to admit he isn't exactly falling into standard with what one would consider a BC.
 

FoxyWench

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#30
id like to see more info in a breed book about the crestie, most just recite the standad and call it a day.
xolos and AHT's also.
 

BostonBanker

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#31
if you take most of the curs and stuck them in the backyard/kennel/on the chain, give them litle to no training, walk them around the block once or twice a month like most people do, you're going to create a problem by putting an intelligent, active dog into enforced inactivity & boredom. in short you are screwing that dog up and will have headaches out the wazoo. now this may be true of most dogs but the effect & results are far worse as the intelligence, intensity & enrgy levels move up the scale.
Meg's a pretty ideal family pet, but I guess to be fair, she also doesn't live the life of an "average" pet. She may not get the chance to hunt (discounting the random things she has caught at the barn), but she is actively trained and competed on a regular basis, and given a lot of "free-time" running loose in the fields or woods. I don't know what she would be like if she were handled differently. And I have no idea how she is bred.

Whisper already mentioned the Lundehund, which is the first breed I always look for. Kelpies are the other non-AKC breed I seek out in breed books.
 

Romy

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#33
American staghounds are one I'd love to see.

I always look for the laikas too, some books have them and some don't.
 

drmom777

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#36
Please don't forget the Karelian Bear Dog. They are amazingly cool, and I like them so they have to go in.

I have the exact opposite opinion from Pops. The incessant claims that big hounds can't be kept as pets keeps people from looking closely at them when they seek dogs in shelters, so most of them die. And there are a lot of them. Coonhounds can make beautiful indoor suburban dogs as long as they get sufficient attention and exercize. In my experience they are way easier that dogs like Huskies and GSPs and Weims that people routinely keep as pets. They seem to feel that when there is nothing to do, the best thing to do is go to sleep until something turns up.
 

Pops2

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#37
Drmom
it isn't that they can't be kept as pets but under the scenario i laid out, which covers about 4 out of 5 pet owners in every location i've ever lived, ANY working bred dog and even crap bred dogs that throw back to the working ancestors in personality WILL develop problems that the owner is unable or unwilling to fix and so the dog ends up in the shelter (or free to good home add). so (theoretically) if people reading the books are forewarned then they don't get a dog they aren't going to turn into a problem.
i would venture the majority of beagles (and a very small number of bigger hounds) in the shelter were bought as pets and sent there when they acted out due to lack of work & training because they ARE hounds and wanted to hunt. the bigger guys OTH are there for several reasons and may in fact be the best choice for a hound as strictly a pet. maybe that should go in the book, "if you want a hound stricly as a pet look for nonhunting hounds in the local pound."
 

Whisper

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#38
Laur, that *has* to be a LH chihuahua. Why do people try to publish info on a breed if they can't make sure they're even picturing the correct breed?
 

Catsi

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#39
As much as I loved that first dog book I owned (sans GSP), it really lacked detail. Gorgeous pics and basic info, probably great for identification and a starting point... but not much deeper.

I love reading breed histories and I also really enjoy trivial facts like what famous people owned such and such a breed. :lol-sign:

I also really love hearing about temperament and personality and the ideal lifestyle for a breed, possible activities to do with your dog etc.

Edit - I know you asked for breeds... Other than the GSP that I keep going on about, I'd love to see the Tibetan Terrier! Although I'm pretty sure they would be a standard inclusion anyway. I love some of the rarer and regional breeds, the Gundog group seems to have so many breeds that haven't seemed to have found popularity elsewhere (well at least in Australia, it may be different elsewhere.)
 
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Pops2

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#40
American staghounds are one I'd love to see.

I always look for the laikas too, some books have them and some don't.
if you do that you need to have australian staghounds & the british stags so people know the difference. on that note would also like to see the welsh & fell hounds.
 

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