Seperating a "bonded pair"

Dekka

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#2
For the most part I think that post is BS. I can see wanting to go with a dog he has always known, but to assume that the dog NEEDS a leader dog...

I would have no hesitation adopting a dog that was part of a 'bonded' pair. As long as I was sure I could keep that dog stimulated and not leave the dog home alone for long periods of time.
 

PWCorgi

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#3
It depends. If they really were bonded to one another I would adopt them together only, especially if they were senior dogs. A lot of times though dogs will come into shelters and the staff just tries to keep them together, when often the dogs really aren't bonded to one another or could care less if they continue living with the other.
 

Laurelin

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#4
I would adopt just one...

I would have told you a while back that Trey could not have survived without Nikki. He looked to her for everything. Then she died a year before he died and Trey did just fine. He did end up transferring his adoration to Beau though. I really do think some dogs need another dog to live with. Trey would not do something on his own, but would follow other dogs' examples.
 

*blackrose

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#5
If a dog is a bonded pair in the way that they pine when away from each other and go into a depression, I wouldn't seperate them.

Rose and Blackie were what I would consider "bonded". When in new situations, Rose was much more confident and sure of herself when Blackie was around. When he passed away, Rose seemed sort of lost for a few days, but being in a stable environment really helped. If her and blackie were suddenly thrown into a topsy turvy place and then seperated, I'm sure they would have done much better together. And I still feel bad for Rose because she doesn't have a buddy anymore - she isn't fond of other dogs and Blackie was the only dog she felt comfortable enough around to be herself with. But they were together for 11 1/2 years, so I think that is a bit different.

And just like Rose adapted once Blackie passed, I think even dogs that are bonded can adapt - it is just is more work and stress than it would have to be if they were kept together.
 

Maxy24

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#6
Of the bonded pairs I've seen only one really needed it. Mostly I think it just breaks the rescuer's hearts to break up mother and child, dogs who mated, etc. They make it all very human. I even remmeber my mom feeling guilty about adopting Tucker because she had to split him from his brother. Of course sometimes dogs do become really attached. In the case of the pair I'm talking about the male dog was very attached to the female dog, the female would be fine by herself but the male would be frantic, couldn't stop looking, wouldn't pay the slightest attention to you, wouldn't come for treats. I think in time he would have gotten over it but if someone would adopt both then it'd make things easier, especially since he'd have to adapt to a whole new house and family too.
Tucker's parents were listed as a bonded pair but after the mom gave birth they had to seperate them and guess what? They did absolutely fine so were no longer listed as required to go together.

The only dogs I'd really be sad about splitting would be elderly dogs that have lived together for years and years, they might do fine but I'd still be sad.
 

JessLough

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#7
Not sure about dogs, but at the ferret rescue, we have some bonded pairs, that we will only adopt out together. Moving to a new house is stressful enough for them, that if they are bonded, we want them to go together. Of course, if there is more than 3 in a bond, they will split up the bond, because nobody wants to adopt, say, 6 ferrets at a time.
 

Bailey08

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#11
I'd feel too awful about the one I left, alone, in a kennel . . . .
I was just about to post the same thing.

I had a hard enough time leaving Bailey's littermate (she was crying and it was horrible), and I knew she'd be adopted quickly.
 
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#12
I've only seen one truely bonded pair, and it was brother doxies who had never been seperated in their entire lives, not even for a few hours. They were elderly, and we refused to split them. They even had to be walked together, because a 20 minute seperation for walks devestated both of them. It was actually a little bit creepy.

Like Laur said, I would have sworn that Radar would pine away and die without Lilly. He looked to her for everything, and was essentially relegated to the role of her toadie, telling us when she had to go out, and basically doing whatever she wanted. She's been gone for two years, and he's just fine. He only seemed to miss her for a day or two, and is quite happy with his only child status.
 

Sweet72947

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#13
I would say it depends on the bonded pair. Most of them I've seen did not need to be adopted together, and would have done fine if separated. People do anthropomorphize animals sometimes and feel bad about splitting "pairs" up, but its better for the dogs in the long term because they will get adopted quicker if adopted out one at a time.

We have a bonded pair at FOHA right now named Puddle and Toot. I've posted some pics on here before, they are border collie mixes, but Toot is about two sizes smaller than Puddle. They sleep in one dog bed together, they can often be seen playing together, and you will see them grooming each other. Its so cute. They have been separated before when Toot had to go to the vet to get neutered, and Puddle did seem a bit lonely, but they would adjust fine if they had other dogs to play with in their new homes. They'll be adopted out together though, because they're just too darn adorable to separate. :p

One other bonded pair that comes to memory was one FOHA had a long time ago. There were three little dogs we got from a hoarding situation and they lived in a run together. One of the dogs, a beagle, was adopted and the other two were honestly, very sad. :( We kept those two together, they were very bonded. They were two males, their names were Brownie and Scooter. Brownie was a brown beagle mix, and Scooter was a sheltie mix. They sure were two peas in a pod. :)
 

Maura

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#15
I think it's usually okay. As for the St. Bernard mix, it would probably do him good to get him away from his sire and be an only dog for a while.
 

smkie

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#16
They talked about that on an episode of Dogtown. One of the staff said it's nice if they can go together but sometimes it is the best thing for them both to go to seperate homes.

I will stand by what he said. In an ideal world a lot of things would be nice, but it's not the end of all if it doesn't happen.
 

Dani

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#18
I think it depends on how bonded they are. Bear was originally brought into the shelter with another dog, a female rottie. They were good buddies but not inseperable. We adopted only Bear at first because the rottie had to go to the vet for a reason I don't remember. After serious consideration we decided to adopt the rottie as well, but when we returned to the shelter she had already been adopted.
 

sparks19

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#19
Yeah I don't think I could break up two dogs that grew up together and have lived together. to think that is their only link to normal life and to seperate them from that. maybe the dog doesn't feel it but I do and I would remember that I left their partner behind.

I don't think I could do it. Beezer and Belle are NOT a bonded pair lol and I think they would do just fine without each other but if they ended up in the shelter together I don't know that I could adopt just one of them knowing their only tie to the only life they have known is the other dog.
 

Dekka

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#20
What if you were not 'leaving' the partner behind. Lets say the other dog is very adoptable and has people wanting to take it. Would you take the other, if the option was that you could take both, or take one and someone else would take the other.

Dash and Bounce are pretty bonded by being littermates. But if separated for days have no issues. Personally I think its mostly anthropomorphism. Biologically it doesn't make sense for canines to 'pine away' if separated, esp non pack canines like dogs. Not to say it doesn't happen, but I think we empathize by projecting what it would mean to us to be separated from a good friend.
 

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