prong collar

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#21
I use them and don't mind them as long as they are used correctly. I see allot of people yanking their animal around with the prong collar on and not using it properly.
 

Brattina88

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#22
I really appriciate all of the info. I'm nervous for tomorrows appt, so I can only imagine how Kayla feels. We'll be riding together, I've talked to her about all of these suggestions. Anxious to hear what the vet has to say. :/

I hope, if it comes down to it, someone at the pet supplies store can help us fit it properly.
 

Lizmo

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#23
think of something like the waistband of your pants. fitted snugly but not digging in. that's what you want. if it's gapping or hanging, then you *are* risking injury.
How is it risking an injury, curious. It's not hanging off their neck, but it's not fitted snuggly, really, either.
 

Saeleofu

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#24
If it's hanging loose, then skin can really get pinched in it. The prong collars aren't meant to actually *pinch*, but if they're too loose they will. Also things can get stuck in a loose collar of any kind, a prong just happens to have more places for things to get stuck in (things as in sticks, paws, etc).

They should fit fairly high on the neck and snug, but not tight. If you can see prong marks from your dog just standing in one (unleashed, just the collar) it's too tight. For the most control it goes right behind their ears, but I typically have it lower down when I use one.

Someone mentioned using a backup collar, too, and that's a very important point. I use a fine choke chain and hook the prong and the flat collar together with it, and attach the leash to the two rings of the chain and to the ring on the prong. It's kind of hard to describe. If you have a quick release prong collar this is even more important. For the record, if you use a halter (which I advise against in most cases, though they too have their uses), you also should be using a backup collar AND a backup lead, so that if the dog hits the end of the leash hooked up to the headcollar you can just let go and reduce the risk of injury (hanging on to the leash attached to the flat collar, though).
 

Lizmo

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#25
For the most control it goes right behind their ears, but I typically have it lower down when I use one.
Hmm. Interesting. I know that if I put a regular collar that high, I get the same control as I do with a prong. I've always thought that was a very sensitive area, so I never felt it was a good idea to put it up that high.
 

Zoom

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#26
A prong collar should be fitted so that it stands in place high up on the neck, but not so tight that it is constantly digging in. If it's too loose and hanging down on the lower part of the neck, it's both less effective and means that the dog will hit the end of the leash with more force than is advisable. If the collar is fitted properly, the dog will get a mild correction from any pressure put on the leash, stopping them from pulling before they really get started.

When starting off on a prong, do NOT allow the dog to have much slack in the lead at all. The last thing you want them to do is getting a running start like they normally do and then hit the collar when they're not expecting it.
 
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#27
Interesting thread.

Wish one is better, the halter or the prong? :confused:

A friend of my sister has a GSD mix that has pulling problems, so we are looking for info.
 

ACooper

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#28
Interesting thread.

Wish one is better, the halter or the prong? :confused:

A friend of my sister has a GSD mix that has pulling problems, so we are looking for info.
IMO that would depend on the person and the dog in question. I tried a few harnesses, didn't work. I tried a head collar, didn't work, he still pulled and jerked his neck. Now I haven't tried the 'new trix' type head collar that Dekka posted so I can't comment on that.

I tried the prong and it works for us. We don't use it in all situations, just the ones I know will be more distractions and possibilities for problems.
 

elegy

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#29
Wish one is better, the halter or the prong? :confused:
it really really depends on the dog. i quite effectively made mushroom more leash-aggressive by using a prong collar on him. i feel really bad about that. on the other hand, luce has had no adverse reaction at all to a prong collar. i would never use one on steve, as he is really soft, but i would use one again on another strong, confident dog if i felt it necessary.
 

Saeleofu

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#30
Wish one is better, the halter or the prong?
I personally think the prong is better that majority of the time when pulling is the real issue. If reactivity is the real issue, then a halter may be a better choice (for example, the dog pulls when it sees other dog). Prongs are safer for the layperson to use. Most people I see with halters have the dog in front of them STILL pulling like hell and think the halter will just magically fix it. BOTH must be used with a backup collar, and it's best to also have a backup leash with a halter. I feel that in the vast majority of cases, the halter is asking for trouble (in the form of neck injuries, eye injuries, etc).

Of course you could also try a martingale, but again most laypeople don't use them correctly and so they're ineffective.
 

Dekka

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#31
See and whilst I like neither I would say the head halter is safer as there is no risk of triggering/increasing reactivity.
 

Brattina88

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#32
:D Tucker 's vet visit went really well!!The vet is pleased with his progress, and couldn't believe how well he is doing. We've got the go ahead for him to come off of crate rest, slooowly start increasing activity. Only have to carry him up the stairs sometimes :D And we can build up to offleash play again... no jumping, though. That's going to be hard (for Tucker) but doable! :p

IMO that would depend on the person and the dog in question. I tried a few harnesses, didn't work. I tried a head collar, didn't work, he still pulled and jerked his neck. Now I haven't tried the 'new trix' type head collar that Dekka posted so I can't comment on that.
This is where we are at, right now.Tucker was doing well on LLW before his injury. You'd think that 6 weeks of crate rest wouldn't make a dog forget ALL of his training, but if you'd meet Tucker, you'd understand :rofl1: He is back to square one... actually, a couple steps behind square one :rolleyes: we're going to try the easy walk again, and work with LLW a lot, also using the clicker. If it doesn't progress well, or fairly soon we'll have to try the prong. The vet agreed that pulling and jerking on the leash will probably result in a related back injury :( and he does not want him on a typical bark harness until he builds up his muscles a little bit more
 

lizzybeth727

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#33
and he does not want him on a typical bark harness until he builds up his muscles a little bit more
I'm assuming you meant "back" harness.

I NEVER use "back" harnesses on dogs for general LLW; if I'm going to use a harness it'd be a front-clip harness. I guess the exception would be if I had a really small dog where the leash would get in the way of her nose. ;) I really don't see when back clip harnesses would ever be better than front clip harnesses.
 

Saeleofu

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#34
I don't use harnesses for LLW either, but that's because I specifically train that harness = PULL with my dogs.
 

Brattina88

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#35
I'm assuming you meant "back" harness.
LOL whoops - yea, I meant back :D :p

I NEVER use "back" harnesses on dogs for general LLW; if I'm going to use a harness it'd be a front-clip harness. I guess the exception would be if I had a really small dog where the leash would get in the way of her nose. ;) I really don't see when back clip harnesses would ever be better than front clip harnesses.
For these guys 'back' harnesses are usually for car riding, and hiking (in which Tucker will not be doing anyway ;))... usually when they already "know" LLW. I'll admit Kayla may have jumped the gun, getting one for Tuckman.
 
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#36
Ah so it depends on the dog, thanks.

Is nice that Tucker is better.

So he nows has to make muscle? I hope he would take it easy or he is going to walk you with those muscles LOL :rofl1:
 

joce

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#37
I have used prong collars and all but my husky responded great to them and one pop was all it ever took.

I like the head harness type collars but they can cause back issues because of how dogs will throw themselves against them. But then again anything can cause some injury;)

Its warmer now. How about swimming to build the muscles up? Get a kiddie pool out in the sun and let him loose.
 

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