Pony pics

Kase

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#1
Wll he's now been with me for nearly 2 months but it feels like I've had him forever, I can't tell you how much I love my little man and how quickly I've fallen for him. He sure is one perfect pony :D.

These pics were taken about a week ago just before the poor guy got collic, had a terrible few days but he's as right as rain now!

Just a few of the hairy beast eating some carrots:









 

*Amy*

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He's so cute! MORE pics please! :D

Has anyone seen the Verizon Wireless commercial where they're saying getting a phone for Christmas is better than getting a pony? YEAH RIGHT! I'd much rather have a pony any day!
 

BostonBanker

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Awww, he is SO CUTE! Glad to hear he's doing okay after the colic. This is a tough time of year for that. Any idea what caused it?
 

Kase

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Thanks guys!

Awww, he is SO CUTE! Glad to hear he's doing okay after the colic. This is a tough time of year for that. Any idea what caused it?
Nope not a clue which is the most annoying thing, I've never had to expericnce it before though so admit I panicked quite a lot, how about you with Tristan or any of your previous horses?
 

BostonBanker

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I've never had to expericnce it before though so admit I panicked quite a lot, how about you with Tristan or any of your previous horses?
LOL In the average day, I'm around a total of close to 50 horses, so I've definitely dealt with colic a fair amount over the last 12 years or so. For years, Tristan would have very mild colics in both the spring and fall, right when the weather was changing. They were never bad - he'd just act uncomfortable, and I'd give him a bit of Banamine, and by the time the meds wore off, he'd be fine.

My old horse, Boston, had massive colic surgery a few years before I got him. Fatty tissue had wrapped around his small intestine, choking off the blood supply. By the time he went into surgery, nearly 1/3 of the intestine was dead and necrotic, and had to be removed. This would be a big, dangerous surgery today, but he had it close to 18 years ago. It was a massive deal, and a miracle he survived.

I've seen one colic surgery (a horse who OD'd on rich hay and got impacted), and seen a lot of impaction colics treated medically. I've also known two horses who got their cecum trapped up over their spleen. The treatment is really interesting, and my vet actually is one of the first people to use it. You give some sort of medication to shrink the spleen, and then make the horse trot on a lunge line for a long time so that the intestine finally "bounces" back into place. Both horses I saw with it had their problems resolved that way without needing surgery!
 

Kase

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LOL In the average day, I'm around a total of close to 50 horses, so I've definitely dealt with colic a fair amount over the last 12 years or so. For years, Tristan would have very mild colics in both the spring and fall, right when the weather was changing. They were never bad - he'd just act uncomfortable, and I'd give him a bit of Banamine, and by the time the meds wore off, he'd be fine.

My old horse, Boston, had massive colic surgery a few years before I got him. Fatty tissue had wrapped around his small intestine, choking off the blood supply. By the time he went into surgery, nearly 1/3 of the intestine was dead and necrotic, and had to be removed. This would be a big, dangerous surgery today, but he had it close to 18 years ago. It was a massive deal, and a miracle he survived.

I've seen one colic surgery (a horse who OD'd on rich hay and got impacted), and seen a lot of impaction colics treated medically. I've also known two horses who got their cecum trapped up over their spleen. The treatment is really interesting, and my vet actually is one of the first people to use it. You give some sort of medication to shrink the spleen, and then make the horse trot on a lunge line for a long time so that the intestine finally "bounces" back into place. Both horses I saw with it had their problems resolved that way without needing surgery!
WOW you've had a lot of experience then! Boston was one lucky horse too! You'll have to tell 'us' more about him, I know you'e talked about him before but I like horse stories ;).
 
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Cute pictures.
we need more pictures lol
I remember my first time with a horse wit colic. scareed the crap out of me. I knew alot about it luckily since I was alone in the barn (the other girl i was working with was out int he field closing gates. We worked as barn staff at a barn with 40+ horses, alot of rescues), Lucky i knew to get her up and walk her quickly as walkie talkied the other girl back in to the barn (lucky we always had our walkie talkies with us)
 

Dekka

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I have sent a mare to Guelph for colic. She colics relaibly in her 9th month of pregnacy if she is not on mineral oil. I lost a pony to colic (torision of the stomach the autopsy revealed)

But while I do know of a few who have died..I know many who lived. I had one pony (will find pics she was sooo cute) who coliced mildly often her whole life no matter what she was fed, or how she was kept.
 

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