Pit bull Owners what do you think?

elegy

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#2
i agree very much with this page of badrap's though i have been frequently disconcerted recently by all their talk of pit bulls are just like all other dogs re: dog-dog interaction. i do not see it reflected in their general information pages yet, just in posts in various places (petconnection blog, pit bull forum, etc).

luce is dog selective and mushroom is incredibly leash reactive but if you get past that and don't include prey-like small dogs, he's somewhere between dog social and dog tolerant (though because he's reactive, he can be quick to get defensive and end up in a fight). harv was dog tolerant.
 

pacopoe

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#3
I personally think all dogs should be judged by that spectrum. I've seen dogs of all breeds become completely dog intolerant once they hit maturity (about the 3 year mark) so I think it's a healthy exercise to constantly check in, see where your dog lies today, but not hold it to that same standard tomorrow. I know a few cold pit bulls and they are... *cold*. Of course, those specimens are about as frequent as cold dogs of any breed... pretty rare. Seriously, imagine any dog and they do eventually have a breaking point (heck, as a human I think my breaking point is much lower than most dogs).

Elegy, I totally know what you're saying. Personally, though, I think it's refreshing to not try and segregate our dogs more than the general public already has. It's not a matter of being naive enough to say that we should no longer pay attention to what our dogs are telling us. Rather, I see it as a jumping board to educate others about their dogs.

For instance, any good trainer of any breed of dog will tell you that it's key to keep your dog socialized. Now, the average Joe Schmoe thinks that means take it to the dog park. We all know the dog park is a bad idea for a heck of a lot of dogs. It also works for some dogs. The problem is when owners never learn to read their dogs and are able to tell if their dog is having a good time, if they're overly amped, or if they're stressed. "But the tail is wagging so that's good, right?"... you know you've heard that before.

At first the rhetoric got me but then I realized, "You know what? Why do I have to be the only one responsible for my dog?"
 

Xandra

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#4
Well, according to the game dog people, a cold dog is a dog that *won't* fight, historical dogmen simply could not get the dog to fight. Meaning, it can be attacked and still not fight.

So just because it is fine with dogs doesn't mean that it is cold. Most dogs if engaged will fight.
 

Pops2

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#5
spot on Xandra
the other name for a cold dog was cull. the ideal temperament for the true pit bulldogs was what they called dog tolerant outside the box but smoking hot in the box. but most were doing good to be dog selective outside the box. a very, VERY FEW cold bitches made good brood bitches because they came from a hot line & threw the line traits in good crosses.
 
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#6
Well, according to the game dog people, a cold dog is a dog that *won't* fight, historical dogmen simply could not get the dog to fight. Meaning, it can be attacked and still not fight.

So just because it is fine with dogs doesn't mean that it is cold. Most dogs if engaged will fight.
This is why iam curious about this term.

Kiwi has been attacked by loose dogs twice and has not fought back at all.

there are two pits down the street that want to kill her and she will play bow at them.

thoughts?
 

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