JOWLS!!!!!!! and hey!

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#1
How do you judge correct collar size on a really jowly dog?

her abundance of neck skin gets twisted up in the collar if it's the traditional 2 finger space between collar and neck and any looser and it will come right off. I've tried flat buckle, martingale and also the head halter which won't stay on and various harnesses with which she pulls like a maniac even the gentle leader. Is there anything else?
 

King Pup

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#2
I would look towards a harness rather than a collar, definitely.

Have you tried the Sporn harnesses? I have a couple of clients who use these to stop pulling and they're really effective. The sherpa sleeves provide a great deal of comfort, too.
 

AGonzalez

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#4
I started out with using a regular heavy duty choke chain on Smokey...upgraded to a prong collar because the choke style just was ineffective. We used the prong collar for a couple of months and then went back to a flat nylon collar and the pulling has stopped.
With the extra loose skin around the neck it's hard to judge what's tight enough to stay on and yet not so tight it rubs hair off. I have this problem with Smokey and he has a collar mark on his hair from it.
 

Maxy24

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#5
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#6
Ordinarily I like a harness. Unfortunately, not only did Tallulah pull WORSE with a harness, she managed to make her chest raw in the process, and even managed to wriggle herself around and get her jaw caught in one of the straps :rolleyes:
 

Maxy24

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#7
I added some no-pull harnesses as well in an edit. I'm not saying I disapprove of you using a prong, I just don't want this person to use one without looking at some other options, you know I am not a fan of those types of collars ;) I do prefer prongs over chokes, at least their spine/neck is safe with a prong.
 
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#8
I'm not a big fan of prongs either, Maxy . . . but I had to suck it up and learn that sometimes they're not an evil ;) I'd never had a dog before that I couldn't use a harness on, although now that we're in town, Kharma does better on a prong as well. She's always been good about walking on a loose leash, but she has lunging issues, lol . . . squirrels, rabbits, people who sit in their cars and stare at us too long . . . She likes to let them know it's not polite to stare, and to be fair to her, when she's after someone for staring, she doesn't even go to the end of her 2 foot leash, she just stands up in front of me and lets them know she's willing ;)

I know how difficult it was for me to suck it up and use the prong collar and how awful I felt, and I'd rather let others know that used PROPERLY it can be a more humane choice - for dog AND owner :)
 

ACooper

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#9
I agree Renee. I always thought the prong collars looked amazingly cruel, but I was pointed in that direction by other dobe people with Orson. I tried it on my upper arm and pulled to see just how bad it was............surprisingly not so bad. While it does pinch when pulled, it's not a "bite" like I thought it would be and the amount of pinch is totally up to the dog.

It offered instant control with Orson, whom I had went through harnesses, chokers (which I HATED and they did NOTHING for his pulling) and even the gentle leader (which scared the pooh out of me because he pulled anyway and whipped his head around)

I say when used and fitted properly, prongs are a very nice tool.
 
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#11
thank you all for the information. I'll be giving all the options a good hard think.

I don't have a problem with prong collars but I don't want to use one with this girl. her general temperment is pretty flighty at the moment.

She was a stray that I picked up and have been through so much for. stolen twice, 4 failed homes that I tried to place her with, legal threats from some a**hole who tried to say I stole her! *punches wall*

I said screw it i'm keeping her after all that crap.

anyways

thanks for the thoughts guys!
 

PWCorgi

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#12
I eventually had to suck it up and just teach my dogs to walk on a loose leash. Smart dogs inevitably will find a way around aids, or just get so used to them that they don't work effectively any more. I have NEVER met a dog more intent on pulling then Izzy. Never. Not in all the years I volunteered in rescue (and I used to get all the pullers passed on to me) and helped other people with dogs. She's only 18 pounds so it isn't like she's going to drag me off my feet, but a pulling dog is one of my biggest peeves and she sure did push me to my limit. I spent so. much. money. on every training aid I could find, she found ways around all of them.

It's so much easier if you just teach your dog right off the bat that pulling is unacceptable.
 

Romy

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#13
What about the martingale didn't work? Just curious, since the mechanics are similar to a prong, except that it doesn't have the prongy parts. There's another variation you might look at called the "french choke"

It's basically a martingale made of chain. The larger part that goes around the neck is two chains thick, which is nice because it is weighted just enough that when the dog is not pulling the collar opens up and isn't so chokey. Some of the fabric ones tend to get stuck more in the closed position, which isn't so great.

The other nice thing about the french chokes is that the chain makes a sound as the dog begins to pull. I like it because it's a loud reminder to the dog that if she keeps pulling, it's going to get tight. Vs. the cloth martingales which are silent.

Lastly, on a shorter coated dog, it looks like a diamond necklace. Awww.

The main drawback I have found is that sometimes the fur on longer coated breeds tends to get caught in the chain. Not tangled badly or anything, but enough to pull hair.

http://www.bowwowshop.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?page=B/PROD/CM/HS50881
 
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#14
Kharma's always been good about walking on a loose leash, and Tallulah is learning. Sort of, lol.

It's the lunging that the prong reminds them about. I have no desire to train that out of Kharma as far as her protective instincts go, and I've been very pleased to note that we've been able to walk past squirrels and rabbits within her line of sight lately without her lunging after them.

The prong collar also serves as a warning to people not to rush up to her ;)

Tallulah . . . well, we'll have to see if she chills out as she matures. Right now, she'll be doing beautifully, then something will catch her eye and she totally forgets, lol. She also really, really likes to pull. I'd love to get her a harness and let her do some weight pulling.
 
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#15
What about the martingale didn't work? Just curious, since the mechanics are similar to a prong, except that it doesn't have the prongy parts. There's another variation you might look at called the "french choke"

It's basically a martingale made of chain. The larger part that goes around the neck is two chains thick, which is nice because it is weighted just enough that when the dog is not pulling the collar opens up and isn't so chokey. Some of the fabric ones tend to get stuck more in the closed position, which isn't so great.

The other nice thing about the french chokes is that the chain makes a sound as the dog begins to pull. I like it because it's a loud reminder to the dog that if she keeps pulling, it's going to get tight. Vs. the cloth martingales which are silent.

Lastly, on a shorter coated dog, it looks like a diamond necklace. Awww.

The main drawback I have found is that sometimes the fur on longer coated breeds tends to get caught in the chain. Not tangled badly or anything, but enough to pull hair.

http://www.bowwowshop.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?page=B/PROD/CM/HS50881
the martingale...the jowls thing...when the loop went tight her loose neck skin would get sucked up into the hardware and she would yelp.

I ended up knitting her a collar lol. a martingale with no hardware save for the loop to clip the leash to. worked great...
 

chanda

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#16
I would look towards a harness rather than a collar, definitely.

Have you tried the Sporn harnesses? I have a couple of clients who use these to stop pulling and they're really effective. The sherpa sleeves provide a great deal of comfort, too.
I will also go for a harness than a collar...
 
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#17
Tallulah . . . well, we'll have to see if she chills out as she matures. Right now, she'll be doing beautifully, then something will catch her eye and she totally forgets, lol. She also really, really likes to pull. I'd love to get her a harness and let her do some weight pulling.

Sounds like Corvus.

I actually have to use a prong on him though because of his severe DA. He walks beautifully at my side until he catches sight (or scent, or sound) of another dog. Then it's game on for him and I have to hold on for dear life.

The prong has made it possible for me to leave the yard with him again.

He really, really needs to do weight pulling. I just don't know anyone who does it around here.
 
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#18
Keri, check at places like Tractor Supply. A lot of those sponsor weight pull events and the one here is where they're held! Makes it nice because it's inside and weather isn't an issue.

PM me your location and I'll see if the people here can't hook me up with whoever runs them in your area.
 

milos_mommy

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#19
My input to this thread is:

How do you find a collar for a jowly dog? You post a lot of pictures.
 
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#20
Keri, check at places like Tractor Supply. A lot of those sponsor weight pull events and the one here is where they're held! Makes it nice because it's inside and weather isn't an issue.

PM me your location and I'll see if the people here can't hook me up with whoever runs them in your area.
I live within 2 miles of the TS here, but I don't recall them ever having any thing like that. I know they don't have the facility to do something like that indoors ... but maybe they host it elsewhere and I've just never heard about it. I used to buy my dogfood there so I always read the event flyers... but I could've missed something I s'pose.

I'll send ya a PM. This boy needs a few more outlets before he kills me.
 

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