Info needed on the following breeds!

mayarego

New Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
2
Likes
0
Points
0
#1
-Cardigan Welsh Corgi
-Pembroke Welsh Corgi
-Beagle
-Miniature Schnauzer
-Italian Greyhound
-Papillon
-Rat Terrier
-Shetland Sheepdog
-Toy/Miniature Poodle
-Toy Fox Terrier

Here are my questions!

1. Are they agile? I'm looking for a good sport dog to compete in agility and potentially obedience. I am also going to do dockdiving with the dog also.

2. How much exercise do they need? I am planning on giving the dog at least 1 30 min walk daily, and at least 30 mins - 1 h running free in a field at least 2-3 times a week.

3. Are they good with elderly people? I am planning on volunteering as a therapy dog at a local nursing home.

4. What motivates them? I need a dog with toy drive and food drive!

5. Are they good with other dogs and cats?



TYIA!
 

Lunamoth

New Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
10
Likes
0
Points
0
Location
Oakland, CA
#2
-Cardigan Welsh Corgi
-Pembroke Welsh Corgi
-Beagle
-Miniature Schnauzer
-Italian Greyhound
-Papillon
-Rat Terrier
-Shetland Sheepdog
-Toy/Miniature Poodle
-Toy Fox Terrier

Here are my questions!

1. Are they agile? I'm looking for a good sport dog to compete in agility and potentially obedience. I am also going to do dockdiving with the dog also.

2. How much exercise do they need? I am planning on giving the dog at least 1 30 min walk daily, and at least 30 mins - 1 h running free in a field at least 2-3 times a week.

3. Are they good with elderly people? I am planning on volunteering as a therapy dog at a local nursing home.

4. What motivates them? I need a dog with toy drive and food drive!

5. Are they good with other dogs and cats?



TYIA!
Wow, these are all pretty different breeds. Some criteria I would consider is where you live/the weather (IGs are not great in cold weather for example) and whether you want to do sports casually (as any pet can) or you want to do so competitively.

I wouldn't say any breed is or isn't good with elderly people, but I will say that the less gentle breeds on your list in my experience are going to be Corgis and Shelties. Herding dogs are usually pretty sensitive and not especially patient (of course this varies wildly with individuals).

I think a mini poodle or a rat terrier could be the right picks for you. They're biddable, food motivated in my experience, and sweet dogs. I wouldn't ever leave a terrier alone with a cat or more than one other dog, personally.

It sounds like you want a patient, adaptable, moderate energy, biddable, people oriented dog. Have you considered a Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, or a Spaniel of some sort? Terriers tend to be less good with other animals, herding dogs less patient with people, hounds not particularly biddable. But of the breeds you've mentioned I'd say rat terrier or poodle. If everything you've listed is important to you I'd get an older dog rather than a puppy, so you know the dog has the traits you want.
 

Maxy24

Active Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2006
Messages
8,070
Likes
2
Points
38
Age
27
Location
Massachusetts
#3
I don't know a ton about you, and I'm not an expert on any of those breeds. But based on what I do know, I'd lean towards mini-poodle for you, as long as you're fine with getting them professionally groomed regularly. You do see them being used for agility and obedience fairly often, go to a breeder that competes in that sort of thing if you are looking to be competitive. Most of the ones I've met have been playful and affectionate, easily motivated. They are very intelligent. I find them much more stranger friendly/affectionate than many (but not all) of the dogs on your list so a good choice for therapy work. We get many in doggy daycare and they do pretty well, though they seem to do best with dogs of their own size, they can be a little anxious. The mini poodle mixes (mini-golden doodles and cockapoos) seem to do better in that environment...a little more happy go lucky.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
6,405
Likes
0
Points
36
Location
Minnesota
#4
I'm not gonna say that Beagles can't do agility or dock diving, but keep in mind that some hounds can be difficult to motivate. It's hard to be more interesting than the environment to that little super-nose.
 

Laurelin

I'm All Ears
Joined
Nov 2, 2006
Messages
30,963
Likes
3
Points
0
Age
32
Location
Oklahoma
#5
I have papillons and have had shelties.

1. Both Shelties and papillons make great agility and obedience dogs. With paps I would be careful to find a more robust line and ask about knee problems in the dogs. In my experience most Shelties and papillons would hate dock diving. I have seen select individuals enjoy swimming but they're not really water breeds.

2. Exercise depends highly on the individual and line. One of my papillons didn't turn off well but overall they've been very adaptable. Shelties have a huge variety of energy levels. Some are off the walls and some are very calm. Keep in mind the sport lines and breeders will have a more intense type of dog. My Shelties were all very adaptable. Both breeds especially papillons are very 'interactive' dogs. It's not so much about needing certain amounts of exercise but rather wanting a lot of attention and mental things to do. My papillons are by far the most 'needy' dog I've had.

3. Depends on the dog. Both paps and Shelties can be therapy dogs. I have known individuals of both breeds that are. That said both breeds can tend to sharp/shy type temperaments. Shelties probably moreso but even in papillons they are not always or even often the best dogs with strangers. My younger papillon would have never remotely made it as a therapy dog. Neither breed is labby in their affection in general for lack of a better word. That said my older pap was a great therapy dog.

4. Motivation? Depends on dog. Food mostly but toys for some of both breeds. Both breeds in my experience are highly trainable and want to work in general. I think paps can be a bit more difficult to motivate for some things. But then again I see low drive and high drive in both breeds.

5. Maybe. Overall I'd say both breeds are generally good with household dogs. Paps and Shelties to a lesser extent can be overwhelmed by really big dogs. None of my papillons have ever wanted to socialize with dogs outside their families. My paps were fine with cats but not fine with rodents. One Shelties was ok with cats but my girl wanted to eat cats.
 

Laurelin

I'm All Ears
Joined
Nov 2, 2006
Messages
30,963
Likes
3
Points
0
Age
32
Location
Oklahoma
#6
I have seen a surprising number of nice beagles in agility. Definitely not a traditional breed but they're there! Rat terriers and mini poodles can do very well too in addition to the more 'traditional' Sheltie, corgi, and papillon.
 

k9krazee

Active Member
Joined
May 29, 2006
Messages
2,423
Likes
0
Points
36
Location
Michigan, USA
#7
The breeds you've listed are all so different!

I put answers in bold for Rat Terrier---

My experience is very limited to my 10 month old standard Rat Terrier, Pox, and his relatives. The breed varies greatly and the breeder and lines should be researched well and individual dogs will be more biddable than others.


-Cardigan Welsh Corgi
-Pembroke Welsh Corgi
-Beagle
-Miniature Schnauzer
-Italian Greyhound
-Papillon
-Rat Terrier
-Shetland Sheepdog
-Toy/Miniature Poodle
-Toy Fox Terrier

Here are my questions!

1. Are they agile? I'm looking for a good sport dog to compete in agility and potentially obedience. I am also going to do dockdiving with the dog also.

Yes! Very athletic and agile. The "Type B" rats are shorter on leg and not as athletic, and the size ranges from Mini Rat 10-13" and Standard from 13-18 so there is a lot of variance in the breed. They were ranked in the top 15 fastest dog breeds though.

2. How much exercise do they need? I am planning on giving the dog at least 1 30 min walk daily, and at least 30 mins - 1 h running free in a field at least 2-3 times a week.

They need a moderate amount of exercise - my RT thrives more with mental stimulation than redundant exercise. He doesn't want to play fetch endlessly but will train as long as I want and that tires him out way more. There are days where we only romp around in the yard, throw a disc a few times or do agility stuff and days where we hike 4+ miles and have playdates with other dogs. He's usually happy to cuddle on the couch unless we've gone too many days without doing anything. He does dig in the yard and destroy the house when he's bored. On the other hand, he's been loose in the house (with a dog door) since he was 11 weeks old and doesn't destroy the house during a workday...just if we come home from work and leave immediately again.

3. Are they good with elderly people? I am planning on volunteering as a therapy dog at a local nursing home.

I had a lady tell me how great of a therapy dog Pox would be - he LOVES people. Adores people. We would be in the check out line at the store and he thought every person walking in the door was there to see him and would be crushed when they walked away. He looks longingly at people when we're on walks around town. He's not really aware of personal space though and is extremely rambunctious around people - like I'm afraid to let him around elderly people or small children lol BUT it's probably a training thing and if I would stop letting him jump on people he'd be fine.

4. What motivates them? I need a dog with toy drive and food drive!

Both! We can transition from food to toys pretty seamlessly. He works for a tug in agility and usually food for tricks.

5. Are they good with other dogs and cats?

Cats - no. Mine isn't despite being around cats every other week since puppyhood. He was fine and playful with the cats until he hit around 5-6 months then it was KILL THE CAT. I know his sister who has been raised with cats and chickens still tries to kill them. Dogs - hit and miss. They seem to really enjoy the company of other Rats and have a play style that's not welcomed by all dogs. Many people say they're happiest in multiples and they like to snuggle together. Very rough and tumble, physical play. Need A LOT A LOT A LOT of socialization.

TYIA!

Pox is not necessarily an easy dog. He's hyper vigilant and gets over aroused very easily. He's reactive on leash. He's super smart and knows he's supposed to come when called, but knows that when he's off leash I can't force him to come. I can yell and scream and he smiles and wags his tail. He wants to be right and good to an extent, but mostly he does things that makes him happy. I have had to learn to be the most fun thing in the room because if he thinks someone else is having more fun he'll join them. He's not a happy-go-lucky dog who loves everything - he definitely has opinions about things and is not afraid to voice his displeasure. High prey drive - he lunges at BIRDS on our walks. But he's a clown and is always entertaining, super cuddly and lovable. Very athletic and takes his "jobs" very seriously. He's always up for anything and is is very willing to try new things.
 

mayarego

New Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
2
Likes
0
Points
0
#8
Wow, these are all pretty different breeds. Some criteria I would consider is where you live/the weather (IGs are not great in cold weather for example) and whether you want to do sports casually (as any pet can) or you want to do so competitively.

I wouldn't say any breed is or isn't good with elderly people, but I will say that the less gentle breeds on your list in my experience are going to be Corgis and Shelties. Herding dogs are usually pretty sensitive and not especially patient (of course this varies wildly with individuals).

I think a mini poodle or a rat terrier could be the right picks for you. They're biddable, food motivated in my experience, and sweet dogs. I wouldn't ever leave a terrier alone with a cat or more than one other dog, personally.

It sounds like you want a patient, adaptable, moderate energy, biddable, people oriented dog. Have you considered a Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, or a Spaniel of some sort? Terriers tend to be less good with other animals, herding dogs less patient with people, hounds not particularly biddable. But of the breeds you've mentioned I'd say rat terrier or poodle. If everything you've listed is important to you I'd get an older dog rather than a puppy, so you know the dog has the traits you want.
I would rather the dog to be under 25 lbs, but maybe a Cocker Spaniel?
 

Members online

No members online now.
Top