English Class

GlassOnion

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#21
I love English class, it's such a nice break from math classes where there's only one set answer.
LOL. For me it's: " I love Math class, it's such a nice break from English classes where you've no idea if there even is a correct answer. "
 
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#23
^This^

Actually that's Bio and Chem lab for me... Math isn't my favourite.
Ditto, I would take science over math and english any time. But I would take english over math too:rofl1:

I always thought english was easy because even if you didn't quite get it you can still write stuff and make it sound meaningful, throw in a couple big AND sophisticated words here and there and say hello to an A or at least B. Seriously thats what got me through English;) Although I'm not going to say that I wrote nonesense for everything. The things I LOOOVED about english was debating and learning how to find the flaws in others arguements (that was with my senior teacher).

Reading boring books like To Kill a Mocking Bird and Catcher in the Rye was very tedious but you can do it. Great Gatsby was OK, wasn't my favorite.lol. Good thing that in my Highschool we had AR reading system where we got to CHOOSE what books we wanted to read and take a test on them :cool:
 

MandyPug

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#24
Ditto, I would take science over math and english any time. But I would take english over math too:rofl1:

I always thought english was easy because even if you didn't quite get it you can still write stuff and make it sound meaningful, throw in a couple big AND sophisticated words here and there and say hello to an A or at least B. Seriously thats what got me through English;) Although I'm not going to say that I wrote nonesense for everything. The things I LOOOVED about english was debating and learning how to find the flaws in others arguements (that was with my senior teacher).

Reading boring books like To Kill a Mocking Bird and Catcher in the Rye was very tedious but you can do it. Great Gatsby was OK, wasn't my favorite.lol. Good thing that in my Highschool we had AR reading system where we got to CHOOSE what books we wanted to read and take a test on them :cool:
My high school let us choose too, and we had the AR system in Junior high and i loved it.

Unfortunately the university doesn't have that! Lol.
 

Dekka

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#25
LOL. For me it's: " I love Math class, it's such a nice break from English classes where you've no idea if there even is a correct answer. "
I heartily agree. I love math for its nice black and white answers and clear un muddied questions.

Chem is nice too, bio a little less so (though biology, particularly molecular bio is where my love is) when it comes to classes. I hated it in the humanities when I held a differing opinion than the person marking it. I could have a valid view, but wouldn't get as good a mark as someone who held the same view.

None of that in the sciences (at least so far)
 

CaliTerp07

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#26
I enjoy having a balanced plate, though I lean more towards the black/whiteness of math. When I was strictly an engineering major, I got really sick of the lack of creativity and fun, but high school had way too much English and history and such for me. The business school was a very nice mix of formulas and practical, people applications for me.

And I COMPLETELY agree that picking apart symbolism in novels is the most annoying thing ever. I hated hated hated reading books like "The Scarlett Letter", or "Heart of Darkness" or "Crime and Punishment". SO painful to get through, and the story is painfully boring--the only reason anyone reads it is because the symbolism gives english teachers something to talk about for hours at a time.

I'm a huge reader (I will read a couple books a week if I have them around), but I read for entertainment, not for psychoanalyzing things. Really though, nearly all upper level classes are pretty useless in day-to-day work, unless you're going into a specialized field. I took so many programming classes, calc classes, english classes, etc etc and don't use any of it in my daily job. These kind of classes teach you to process information in different ways, learn quickly, and prove you are well-rounded. All things employers want to see.
 
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#27
I read The Scarlet Letter long before high school, lol . . . and re-read it . . . because I thought it was a good read . . . but I read Beowulf (in the original) and Canterbury Tales the same way *ducks* I thought the symbolism was fascinating, too -- kind of like finding treasure *runs*
 

BostonBanker

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#28
I read The Scarlet Letter long before high school, lol . . . and re-read it . . . because I thought it was a good read . . . but I read Beowulf (in the original) and Canterbury Tales the same way *ducks* I thought the symbolism was fascinating, too -- kind of like finding treasure *runs*
Heck, I still read Camus for FUN. While I've always been a huge reader, my teacher for honors and AP English in high school completely opened up my mind as to how I read. Sure, I still read books just for fun and don't dwell much on the details - I'm flying through the Dresden Files series right now during any little break I have during the day, and having a blast.

But the really good literature sort of demands some effort from the reader. I don't think I would have enjoyed Crime and Punishment, or fell so hard for Camus' The Plague if I HADN'T had some understanding of the authors' beliefs, the situations that existed when they were written, and the true meaning behind the stories. It's like opening those little Russian dolls, where each layer reveals more and more complexity.
 

Zoom

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#30
Just about every book has some underlying meaning or a hidden agenda. Finding those can be fun...Shakespeare gets a LOT more interesting when you get beyond the mere words on the page. "Much Ado About Nothing" is downright *hilarious* when you understand the astounding amount of double entendres contained within...like the fact that "nothing" was slang for a "womenly parts" and that the entire play is about people freaking out over what one of the female characters may or may not have done with her female parts and who she did it with.

Now, I do think there are professors and teachers out there who go way to far and insist that nearly every line has some hidden meaning to it. I've had more than one book ruined for me because of that. What gets me even more is when they say that my interpretation of the text is "wrong" and the only reason they can give is "just because it doesn't match what everyone else is saying."

I completely understand about the Great Gatsby. I read that senior year, hated it and have never picked it back up. Yet at the same time, I spent a good part of the last two summers going through and reading a bunch of the old classics, like The Yearling, Robinson Crusoe, etc. and picking them apart on my own time and looking up things on line to see if I'm on the right track.

Then again, I was an English major. :p
 
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#33
Nope. I avoided that, lol! Just like I avoided chemistry ;) Loved biology, but knew I'd be bored and never apply myself to chemistry or physics.

Logic appeals to me. Logic is not to be found in calculus, chemistry or physics :eek:
 

Lizmo

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#37
but I read Beowulf (in the original) and Canterbury Tales the same way *ducks* I thought the symbolism was fascinating, too -- kind of like finding treasure *runs*
I could never understand -fully- the original version of Beowulf. The 'newer' edition was a very fun read, though. :p

I just finished the Canterbury Tales for school, recently, and LOVED it!
 

Nechochwen

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#38
Physics and math are all very much logic based.

Chemistry is witch's magic wrapped up in a thin layer of logic and passed off as science.
 

Romy

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#39
Physics and math are all very much logic based.

Chemistry is witch's magic wrapped up in a thin layer of logic and passed off as science.

^^^^This!!! :rofl1:

Then again, maybe I'm just bitter because I took it four times before finally passing, and had a crazy Kazahkstani professor who sounded exactly like Bartok the bat from Anastasia. :rofl1: He was a little nutty besides that.
 

Romy

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#40
Heheh . . . Romy, now that I've read some of The Book of Merlyn in a scholarly form of translation (Nikolai Tolstoi), I've realized that Tolkein didn't write anything new in LTOR -- it's the classic Celt legend, paraphrased. "The names have been changed. . ." ;)
Basically yeah, it's a bunch of old faerie stories. :p
 

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