Dog Boarding at the Humane Society

~Jessie~

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#1
The Seattle Humane Society offers dog boarding... would you feel comfortable boarding your dog at a place that adopts dogs out?

I would NEVER board my dog at ANY rescue organization... I don't board my dogs anyway, but I couldn't imagine dropping them off and then worrying about what if they were mixed up with the rescue dogs.

Thoughts?

http://www.seattlehumane.org/services/services/boarding
 

CaliTerp07

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#2
Sure, why not? We boarded rabbits all the time at the rabbit rescue I worked with. (It was part of the county shelter, just managed/maintained by private volunteers).

We didn't always have space, so you couldn't make a reservation more than a week or so in advance, but lots of people utilized it, and none of their rabbits were ever adopted out. We just put a big "DO NOT ADOPT OUT" sign on their cage or hutch door, and the sign went with them to the exercise pens when they went out.

I've also watched people's dogs and my foster dogs at the same time before. There's never any chance that I'll accidentally take the wrong one to an adoption event! Most of the volunteers with the rescue do that--they'll watch a rescue alum while the owner is gone, in return for a donation to the rescue. It's a nice way to get a little extra money for the charity.
 

mom2dogs

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#3
No.

But then again, like I've said on here before, I don't trust the vast majority of boarding kennels to begin with.

and at first I thought this thread would be something along the lines of what happened last year at a local shelter. . . people would go on vacation (who wouldn't pay/"couldn't" afford boarding rates) and surrender their pets, figuring if they were still there when they got back they would adopt it (what's scary, is some of the owners were approved) :yikes:
 

CaliTerp07

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#4
No.

But then again, like I've said on here before, I don't trust the vast majority of boarding kennels to begin with.
I'll give you that. I would much rather have Lucy stay with a friend than in a kennel, because she's such an attention wh*re--I don't think a kennel would be near enough stimulation or exercise for her.

That said, I see no difference between a HS kennel or a private boarding kennel, except that in the first, your money's going to a good cause.
 

Bailey08

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#5
I agree with Cali that it sounds like a really great way for a shelter/rescue to bring in some additional money. I think for a lot of dogs, and their owners, it would be a great alternative.

That said, Bailey wouldn't be boarded in a shelter setting. He wouldn't need to, because I only board him at his daycare or, if that wasn't available, would get a petsitter from a local organization I used for a long time (for a dog walker) and absolutely trust. I don't think the risk of him being accidentally adopted out would be great, but the thought of it would totally stress me out. Finally, I would worry about the health risks of him being around so many rescue dogs. I don't know that the potential health risk would be an issue for other dogs, and I don't think they'd be greater than, say, boarding at a vet's office, but B has a sensitive immune system.
 

~Jessie~

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#6
We don't board our dogs... we have a pet sitter come to our house when we go out of town.

We day boarded Chloe before at our old vet's office, and they fed her Science Diet when we had told them NOT to feed her anything since she had already eaten. She was throwing up when we took her home so we called to see if they had fed her anything... low and behold, one of the kennel workers fed her :mad:

So yeah, if I can't even trust a vet's office not to screw up their food, how can I trust the Humane Society not to adopt my dogs out accidentally?
 

CaliTerp07

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#7
We don't board our dogs... we have a pet sitter come to our house when we go out of town.

We day boarded Chloe before at our old vet's office, and they fed her Science Diet when we had told them NOT to feed her anything since she had already eaten. She was throwing up when we took her home so we called to see if they had fed her anything... low and behold, one of the kennel workers fed her :mad:

So yeah, if I can't even trust a vet's office not to screw up their food, how can I trust the Humane Society not to adopt my dogs out accidentally?
Sorry you had a bad experience, but those are two totally different things.

Going with your logic though, how can you trust a pet sitter not to feed science diet? Or to steal your dogs? Or to accidentally leave the door open and let them all escape? Or to forget to close the food container and you come home to find your dogs all ate buckets of food? For that matter, how do you know the pet sitter isn't going to get in an accident on her way to your house, end up in the hospital, and forget to tell someone to come by to let the dogs out? Leaving your dog with anyone for any period of time is an act of trust and faith. You do your research, find out if you're comfortable, and go with it. It's scary, but there's risk with anything. You found a situation you're comfortable with, and that's great--but there's probably the same level of risk there as there is in any other situation.

If Lucy would be comfortable in a boarding situation, I'd rather it was at the humane society where I know the volunteers are good people and my money was going to charity than to a private person.
 

mom2dogs

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#8
My "big" issue is, a lot of people who are volunteers with HS and rescues are also not the brightests bulbs in the boxes (in the areas I've live in). A lot of them are young kids volunteering with little experience. Are THESE the people taking care of these dogs? Because if so, no thanks. I think what they are doing is absolutely great, and I applaud them for helping their community. . . but the big issue I have with facilities is the lack of common sense, especially when you add my dogs into the mix who are no the easiest :rofl1:

I'm not so much concerned with them adopting my dogs out, but moreso with the level of experience. At least with most facilities I can go in, talk with the empoyees, the owner, etc etc etc. I would want to meet the volunteers (or employees) who will be taking care of my dogs, would be interesting to know if this is possible with them and their schedules.
 

~Jessie~

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#9
Sorry you had a bad experience, but those are two totally different things.

Going with your logic though, how can you trust a pet sitter not to feed science diet? Or to steal your dogs? Or to accidentally leave the door open and let them all escape? Or to forget to close the food container and you come home to find your dogs all ate buckets of food? For that matter, how do you know the pet sitter isn't going to get in an accident on her way to your house, end up in the hospital, and forget to tell someone to come by to let the dogs out? Leaving your dog with anyone for any period of time is an act of trust and faith. You do your research, find out if you're comfortable, and go with it. It's scary, but there's risk with anything. You found a situation you're comfortable with, and that's great--but there's probably the same level of risk there as there is in any other situation.

If Lucy would be comfortable in a boarding situation, I'd rather it was at the humane society where I know the volunteers are good people and my money was going to charity than to a private person.
Why would a pet sitter come to my house and bring their own bag of Science Diet when I have a storage container of my own kibble on the counter?

My dogs are kept in my room, and none of them can make it to the counter to get into the kibble container.

Our pet sitter emails us daily, so if she couldn't make it over, my mom could drive up and take the dogs (she has a spare key ;) ).

Of course there is a risk with anything, but I would never leave my dogs somewhere they could accidentally get adopted out from. I wouldn't leave my children at an orphanage for child care.

The idea of my pets getting mixed up with dogs who were surrendered by their owners is scary... and something I'd rather not chance.

Not to mention, at $35/dog per day, the Humane Society would never cross my mind for boarding. I wouldn't trust the volunteer workers to properly care for my dogs, like mom2dogs said.
 

MafiaPrincess

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#10
Hells no. Unless they have a separate section. What if they put your dog in the wrong cage if it is taken out. Gets put in a cage without the do not adopt sign.

What about disease control? Unlike rescues I've heard of things like parvo sweeping the entire kennel facilities of the humane society here and many dogs just getting put down from it. Having had the shots is no guarantee and shelters are close quarters.

Glad that they can maybe find other ways to make money but no way I'd take my dogs there to be boarded.

Like the orphanage analogy Jessie. I see it that way too.
 

LilahRoot

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Hells no. Unless they have a separate section. What if they put your dog in the wrong cage if it is taken out. Gets put in a cage without the do not adopt sign.

What about disease control? Unlike rescues I've heard of things like parvo sweeping the entire kennel facilities of the humane society here and many dogs just getting put down from it. Having had the shots is no guarantee and shelters are close quarters.

Glad that they can maybe find other ways to make money but no way I'd take my dogs there to be boarded.

Like the orphanage analogy Jessie. I see it that way too.
This was the first thought that popped into my head. What about ringworm and mange also. No way. I don't even touch my dogs or cats after I come home from just VISITING the shelter. There is no way that I am going to board them there.

Jessie I totally agree with you. If there are idiots out there mixing up dogs with coyotes and setting the dog loose in the woods to die who's to say they won't accidentally adopt your dog out?
 

elegy

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#12
i wouldn't worry so much about them adopting my dogs out but i would worry about disease. yes, you have that risk any time you're looking at a kennel situation, but at least there's some level of "quality control" in your average boarding kennel who requires vaccines. with a shelter, they have no idea what's coming in the door, what diseases it's carrying.
 

~Jessie~

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#13
The disease control is definitely scary as well... I didn't even think of that at first. I could not EVER imagine leaving my dogs at the shelter while I went out of town. No way.
 

CaliTerp07

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#14
We had a separate section at the shelter for boarding rabbits. They were kept in a segregated set of hutches. I assume most shelters would do it the same way, but we obviously don't know. Seattle is a major metropolitan city, not the rural south or an impoverished area where these horror stories of 10 dogs to a cage and disease spreading rampant seem to happen.

$35/day is much cheaper than similar boarding things I looked into here. Seattle is an expensive city. I'm sure that's the going market rate for boarding.

Look, if you don't want to do it, don't. But don't imply that boarding your dog at a shelter is like leaving your kid at an orphanage when you go out of town--that's ridiculous, and frankly rather insulting to me. Not all shelters are alike, and I would trust anyone at the city shelter (where we adopted Lucy from) to care for my dog. They are all trained volunteers and employees who are very knowledgeable, responsible people from every interaction I've had with them.
 

smkie

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#15
Absolutely not. I would not board them in a facility in the first place, I would rather trust a family member or trusted friend with their care and that is what I have done in the past when I had to go to the hospital. IF there was no other choice and I had to go with a business it would not be at the humane society no matter how much I appreciate and support their good efforts the sounds and smells would be far too much for Victor, he can barely handle going to the clinic there. NOr would it be some place like Pete and Mac's. I would rather go with a pet sitter service and keep them in their own home. ONe that I screened heavily first. My house can and has burned down and things are just things, but Victor and Pepper are everything to me and I would not take leaving them and trusting someone else lightly. I grew up working in kennels and I have seen a lot that I wish I hadn't. Seen a lot of good, but seen some things I don't approve of as well.
 

~Jessie~

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We had a separate section at the shelter for boarding rabbits. They were kept in a segregated set of hutches. I assume most shelters would do it the same way, but we obviously don't know. Seattle is a major metropolitan city, not the rural south or an impoverished area where these horror stories of 10 dogs to a cage and disease spreading rampant seem to happen.

$35/day is much cheaper than similar boarding things I looked into here. Seattle is an expensive city. I'm sure that's the going market rate for boarding.
I would NOT pay the "going rate" for boarding at the Humane Society. WHY would you pay $35 a night to expose your dog to disease, chance them getting mixed up with adoption dogs, get taken care of by unpaid volunteers who don't have names attached to their jobs like paid employees do, etc, etc?

I googled Seattle dog boarding, and $35 seems to be one of the highest prices for boarding... especially when you're leaving your dog at a shelter for a night.

Look at how awesome this place is... and it's $30 a night:

Seattle Doggie Daycare and Kennel Free Dog Boarding with pick up and drop off service available

Here's another for $35 a night:

Dog Run Lodge - Rates & Services

Look, if you don't want to do it, don't. But don't imply that boarding your dog at a shelter is like leaving your kid at an orphanage when you go out of town--that's ridiculous, and frankly rather insulting to me. Not all shelters are alike, and I would trust anyone at the city shelter (where we adopted Lucy from) to care for my dog. They are all trained volunteers and employees who are very knowledgeable, responsible people from every interaction I've had with them.
That's great that your shelter is good with their rescue dogs... but a rescue is supposed to be a temporary inbetween place for dogs... NOT a boarding facility.

You're insulting orphanages, then, with your logic... as I'm sure many of them are nice places with knowledgable people working and volunteering there ;)
 

~Jessie~

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#17
As for diseases... at a boarding facility, loved pets are being dropped off and HAVE to have their vaccinations up to date to be boarded.

At a humane society, owners surrender their dogs and who knows WHAT they were exposed to... so shelter volunteer Mary takes in a dog who unknowingly had ring worm... then she goes to check on YOUR dog being boarded and infects YOUR dog with ring worm.

It's not like 10 dogs need to be shoved in filthy cages for this to happen.
 

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#18
no way.

I think Beezer would worry himself to DEATH if he was ever in a shelter environment again. He couldnt' handle it.

We have a house sitter that we use when we go out of town and Beezer even frets about that. e ven though he's in his own home.

I've used a boarding facility before with Beezer and it took weeks for him to recover from the stress... I couldn't imagine putting him back into a shelter type environment. I don't think he'd ever recover.

he's sensitive lol

plus there would always be the worry about disease and a mix up.

Wasn't there a story not too long ago about a dog that ended up at the shelter (can't remember how) but the owner was on their way to pick the dog up and they "accidently" euth'd the dog?
 

Southpaw

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#19
I wouldn't do it, however the thought of my dogs accidentally being adopted out wouldn't even cross my mind. I just don't like kennel situations, for my dogs at least. I'll be out of town next weekend so Juno goes to a cage-free boarding place where she gets to play all day. And Lucy would not be good in that environment, so one of my friends is staying at my house with her. Both of my dogs would go nuts being kenneled all day. Disease would concern me most. Although, I work at a vet clinic, we board animals.... and a couple of my coworkers have their own rescue organization. Many times a couple rescue dogs are boarded there for a couple days or even a couple weeks. The risk is still less than in a shelter environment, but one rescue dog boarding at my clinic could still have who knows what wrong with it.
 

Laurelin

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#20
There's no way I would board my dogs at the local shelter. No way in hell. I've seen the way that place is run and what comes in the doors. Diseases, stressful environment, not knowledgeable workers, etc...
 

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