Dangerous Dog Law

Pops2

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#21
This.

Although this particular dog was in the wrong (if it was at large at the time) but dangerous dog laws IMO seems to give people the belief that they can do whatever they want to any dog they see and if the dog bites them, the law will protect them and too bad if the dog is taken away or PTS ... at least my area seems to have people who have at least a shred of common sense.
Sadly in many places this is true. In many jurisdictions the law does not discriminate between a provoked or unprovoked bite, but does generally exempt police K9 dogs even if the bite is unprovoked.
 

BostonBanker

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#22
The article does state that there is an appeals process, which I assume is where you can explain that the neighbor was throwing rocks at the dog, or the bite occurred when someone broke into your home. Given that there is only one dog in the city labeled 'dangerous', I would guess the appeals generally work. Or they have remarkably low bites in that city.
 

JessLough

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#23
Meh, I absolutely 100% agree that that all dogs should be held to the same standard.

When it comes down to it, whether I'm getting treatment for the bite of a chihuahua or treatment for the bite of a lab, I'm still having to get treatment from an attack simply because I walked down the street. (Using the OP example)

When you start to exempt breeds that are under a certain weight, you're just setting up BSL.

Plus, like somebody else said, where do you draw the line? What's the weight limit? An attack from a 50lb dog is going to be much worse for a child than it is for me, and worse for me than it's going to be for, for example, my father.

Another analogy before I step off my soap box and put on my flame suit: I work with students. I live near a college town. I greatly enjoy spending time in the college town after hours. But my job requires me to acknowledge my position even when I am on my own social time. If I am in a situation where I might encounter the students that I work with, I cannot act sloppily and lose sight of the fact that I am a role model both inside and outside of work. Is it truly fair that those college students can go out to bars in skimpy outfits and get sloppily drunk and not have to worry about a thing in the world except for their own dignity, while I (who am the same age as many of those students) cannot act in that manner? No, it is not fair at all. But it comes with the territory and I understand and accept why it isn't "fair." Quite frankly, I never acted that way to begin with, but the fact of the matter is that fair is not always the best way to go about things.
Eh, I think it's fair. You chose to accept this job. This is something you chose to accept with it. It's also not the same thing at all. You knowingly accepted a job where you would have to keep up appearances at all times. Somebody didn't choose to get attacked by a dog on their walk.
 

Dogdragoness

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#24
Sadly in many places this is true. In many jurisdictions the law does not discriminate between a provoked or unprovoked bite, but does generally exempt police K9 dogs even if the bite is unprovoked.
If they are going to make a bite law, there needs to be something in it that protects the dog owner if the person bitten was doing something inappropriate that lead up to the bite. Because I shouldn't be liable for someone's stupidity.
 

Romy

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#25
Another thought with this is that we're talking about adults mostly here. A 9lbs dog can absolutely cause significant damage to a baby, toddler, child etc.
Kids is what I was thinking of too.

Just to throw it out there, one of my friends had a west highland white. Someone broke into her house. Someone went to the ER and got over 300 stitches. All below the waist, but still.

And having to get rabies shots really sucks.
 

Shakou

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#26
Likewise, a 9 pound aggressive dog can be physically overpowered by an average person. A 100 pound dog with the same behavioral attributes? Not a chance. The aggressive behavior is not acceptable in either instance, but let's just say that I don't mind the outcome for "Blackie." "Blackie" in the story can be appropriately managed without any special training or gear. If "Blackie" happened to be a 150 lb Fila mastiff and I lived next door, I would be doing my hardest to get that dog put down. Fair? No, not really. But life isn't fair and those of us with large dogs should be held to a standard that those of us with small dogs might never have to face.
I'm sorry, but I really don't buy the whole "life isn't fair" thing when it comes to things like this. Life being unfair doesn't mean laws shouldn't be. EVERYONE should be held accountable for their dog's actions. Size shouldn't give you a free pass. The absolute worst dog bite injuries I've ever seen personally were given to my own dog by a 15 pound JRT who attacked Ma'ii unprovoked on a busy street. The dog flung itself out an open car window at a red light just as we were crossing the street, and went right for him. Ma'ii required stitches in his arm pit and shoulder. The wounds were so deep, you could see his fat tissue. Kicking and hitting the dog did NOTHING. Once he was attached, he wasn't letting go. It was only when my other dog jumped in to Ma'ii's defense that the dog finally let go of him.

There's absolutely no doubt this dog could have caused some serious injuries to a person, and even worse to a young kid. If the law had over looked because it was a small breed dog, that's not only completely ass-backwards, but incredibly dangerous.
 
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