Adopting a retired dog from Breeder?

Fran101

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#1
Well ive been considering it, I want another dog.. but the thing about puppies is that Potty training is a nightmare, and the dog I want (papillion) is rarely EVER in shelter/rescues.
So ive emailed a breeder I like about adopting a retired dog from them.

Soo what do you guys think? Has anyone ever done it before? would you?

a part of me feels like im missing out on the puppy phase.. but on the other hand, i adopted kenya as an adult and shes totally awesome and loves me just as much as if i got her as a puppy


I want one NAOOOOOOO! :)
 
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#3
Not only is it great for YOU, THE DOG, but it is super to know that there are such great people willing to give an older retired dog a SUPER home.

It is not easy for most breeders, but if it has the best interest of the dog at heart...they should go for it, and so should YOU!

:D

S
 
F

FluffyZooCrew

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#4
I've adopted 4 retired breeder dogs, though mine were from a puppymill, not a typical breeder.

I think it's a great idea. It's giving an old dog a chance to be placed into a great home. I'm partial to seniors anyways though. :D
 

LauraLeigh

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#5
It is a nice way to get a great dog IMO... sometimes they are not even that old, just were unable to be shown or bred for any number of reasons... So long as the breeder is upfront with you as to why they are retiring them I can see no reason why not!! Sometimes a promising puppy just does not hold it's own as an adult, in my breed for instance a serious working terrier person often will retire a dog that was not as gamey as they'd like... That same dog can often make an awesome pet!
 
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#6
Absolutely a FANTASTIC way to get a dog. Kaylee became mine because she didn't live up to her potential (GREAT structure, has a head fault that's VERY hard to breed out, so no breeding for her.) You get the benefit of the breeder's very best socialization and GREAT handling, a dog that's used to grooming and household routines, generally a totally known history and known behavior with all sorts of stuff. I think this is honestly the VERY BEST (in terms of ease of fit/settling in) way to get a dog. :)
 

SizzleDog

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#7
I think it's a great idea - pretty, already potty trained, most have manners training, and it's great for the dogs. :D
 

smkie

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#8
WE never did that at our kennel. THey were allowed to retire in grace with their families and what was familiar. I sure hope if a dog does get adopted out like that it gets someone like you. THat really bothers me. HOpe at the end they get to be someone' special.:(
 

bubbatd

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#10
Depends ....if it's retired from breeding NO ! Shouts Mill . If from showing maybe ...but most love their dogs to the end .
 

LauraLeigh

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#11
Depends ....if it's retired from breeding NO ! Shouts Mill . If from showing maybe ...but most love their dogs to the end .
Really?? I know some very good breeders, a far cry from puppy mills, who in order to be able to carry on sometimes pet retired breeders... They have limited space and in order to carry on they sometimes have to place some of their dogs. Having said that, they are super, super fussy where retired dogs go.

That does not mean they don't love them, just that in order to not get overwhelmed they have to retire and pet some of their dogs. A good home for many of these dogs, with less hustle and bustle than a busy home is not always a bad thing and I bet most of them are quite happy in their new center of attention life...
 

Fran101

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#12
"Forevr Papillons makes available to people who want to offer a special place in their hearts an older an adult Pap. We also feel that after they are no longer being part of the Forevr breeding program they deserve to become loved and spoiled as special lap Paps in companion homes. The cost of a retired companion is usually just the expenses for neutering and dentals, as well as annual expenses such as their current vaccinations. "

i think that pretty much sums it up
 

bubbatd

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#13
Probably so ....I've just never know any . They were all " family " whether producing or not .
 

Laurelin

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#14
I have done this and totally would again! Summer is a retired breeder and is my heart and soul. I wish she didnt' have SA but not all retired dogs or rehomed breeder dogs have that. Trey was grown out and then sold to us when he didn't work out and Rose was a failed show prospect that ended up with us. None of their breeders or previous owners were millers or anything of the sort (even if we didn't see eye to eye). We showed against several Forevr dogs when we were showing and I know quite a few people with their dogs that seem happy with them. I haven't met any in person except briefly in shows. Type wise I either really like their dogs or they're really not my style but that seems typical with most papillon lines in the US. They're pretty all over the place type wise here.

I think I've mentioned before that they own the papillon yahoo group I'm on. Prospective owners of papillons are more than welcome to join. :)
 

Fran101

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#15
I have done this and totally would again! Summer is a retired breeder and is my heart and soul. I wish she didnt' have SA but not all retired dogs or rehomed breeder dogs have that. Trey was grown out and then sold to us when he didn't work out and Rose was a failed show prospect that ended up with us. None of their breeders or previous owners were millers or anything of the sort (even if we didn't see eye to eye). We showed against several Forevr dogs when we were showing and I know quite a few people with their dogs that seem happy with them. I haven't met any in person except briefly in shows. Type wise I either really like their dogs or they're really not my style but that seems typical with most papillon lines in the US. They're pretty all over the place type wise here.

I think I've mentioned before that they own the papillon yahoo group I'm on. Prospective owners of papillons are more than welcome to join. :)
I havent been able to find ANY pap breeders other than Forevr that rehome older dogs, would you mind me asking what breeder gave you summer?

lol i was planning on keeping this whole me having a pap thing a surprise.. but im so bad at secrets!! :p
 

LauraLeigh

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#16
Probably so ....I've just never know any . They were all " family " whether producing or not .
See my dogs are family as well.... and I have my original terriers here to this day. However it just rubs me wrong that you seem to be insinuating that breeders who rehome retirees are not giving their dogs that family life.... If a breeder in breeds such as JRTs ( Live easily 14 years and up... ) does not retire any, and has 2 dogs they breed even every couple of years ( and most have at least 3 or 4 ), they keep one pup to promote... in just 5 years they'd have 7 dogs, and may be unable to continue working and trialing their breed without the option of finding great retirement homes for them.

I know a great breeder whom is an avid hunter, I was at his home once when one of his gang had a birthday and they had "meatloaf" cake for him... I have had meals with them often with a terrier on his lap waiting patiently to be offered a treat. His dogs live in his home and are a part of their family... He has placed retirees though, and will have to do so in order to carry on. He kept his foundation terriers until the end, but has found great homes for others...

I have heard it described like a child growing and leaving home, they keep in touch but are in a different home... The breeders that I know who have to d this, don't do it lightly... and find homes they really trust and believe in, where they can keep up with their dog.

I do know a great many BYB's however, who have a few dogs they love, and because they don't do anything with them besides love them, they have their dogs until the end... They breed them until they cannot breed anymore and then just let them live out their lives at their home, happy I am sure but I'd rather the pup from the breeder with their breeds best interests at heart, rather than the one from the BYB who loves his/her dogs but cares little about the breed...

Just my opinion though..... :D
 

Laurelin

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#17
I havent been able to find ANY pap breeders other than Forevr that rehome older dogs, would you mind me asking what breeder gave you summer?

lol i was planning on keeping this whole me having a pap thing a surprise.. but im so bad at secrets!! :p
Lol! You need a papillon. ;)

I'll send you a pm of some breeders in the area that sometimes have adults available. I know Summer's breeder doesn't have anything right now but I think a couple more members of the Tulsa club *might*.

Of course all the people I'm familiar with are in OK/TX/Kansas/Arkansas area. Is that too far?
 
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#18
I guess there is something dishonest about giving up a dog in it's twilight years. After having been faithful all of it's life to the owner, like Paris Hilton, giving her chi wa wa the boot, this owner decides that it isn't worth her while to give her faithful dog a home.

There is just something oddly sad and peculiar about this, especially coming from an "animal lover".
 
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#19
From my understanding, these "retired" dogs aren't usually in their twilight years. Mostly they seem to be in their prime when having a home where they can be front and center in a family is a dog's dream life.

Look at Laurelin and her family and the Paps who share their home after being retired!
 

Laurelin

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#20
I guess there is something dishonest about giving up a dog in it's twilight years. After having been faithful all of it's life to the owner, like Paris Hilton, giving her chi wa wa the boot, this owner decides that it isn't worth her while to give her faithful dog a home.

There is just something oddly sad and peculiar about this, especially coming from an "animal lover".
That is misinformation at best. Retired breeders are often NOT in their twilight years. My adult dogs I have gotten from breeders were 1, 2, and nearly 4 respectively. They are not unloved either.

There are two ways you can get an adult from a breeder. 1) Grown out puppy/failed show/working prospect. This is where the breeder keeps a dog for however long then the dog either goes over/undersized/faulted and can't be shown or the breeder simply decides the dog is not something they want in their breeding stock. Trey was undersized at a year so we got him, Rose among a few things (long story) didn't have the temperament to show and was too small for the breeder to feel comfortable about breeding her. She was actually a failed show prospect that was sold then returned then given to us.

2) Retired breeders. I can only speak about my retired breeder but my breeder has rehomed 3 retired breeding dogs. I know another family that has 2 retired papillons (well one failed show dog and one retired breeder) from another breeder. Summer was retired after losing two litters. One reabsorbed and the other was a single stillborn pup. After a difficult second pregnancy and bad labor they didn't want to try it again. She was highly distressed about losing her puppy and really did not enjoy living in such a busy household where there would soon be more puppies. (It was a rare year where she had 2 litters) Summer was also a highly active dog and her breeder had begun having some major hip problems so could not physically keep up with her and give Summer the exercise she really needed. I am a lot younger than she is and a lot more active so she knew I could give Summer a life that she couldn't. Summer and her breeder are very close and we see them all the time. She is like the reincarnation of her breeder's foundation bitch and heart dog in every way. I KNOW it was hard to give her up and she always gets very teary eyed when Summer leaves. After all, she lived with her for four good years. But she also mentions how happy Summer is with me and how glad she is I have her. Also, I should note I had known Summer since she was a puppy so it wasn't like she was going to a complete stranger.

The other two she rehomed actually live together with a very close friend of hers (and now mine). They were both getting up there in the years and not enjoying the rambunctious puppies around. They now live right down the road from their breeder and are working therapy dogs who are spoiled rotten by their new mom. They go visit their old home practically every week.

The people I know that have a pap from another breeder as a retiree got her at 9 and she now lives with her littermate.

Going from one loving home to another is not a big change for many dogs at least in my experience. I would be concerned if breeders just got rid of all their older dogs for no reason but I know sometimes giving dogs up is the best for them.
 
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