A Preemptive Strike

M

musictech

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#41
Patellar luxation, can usually be diagnosed within the first six months of a dogs life. As for the parents, I did not see the medical paperwork for the parents. I got a copy of the certificates from the vet about my pup, and names and addresses of the parent's owners.

This is once again, one of the things I need to look into further before I decide if I am going to breed my pup, in a couple years.
 

bubbatd

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#42
It's interesting that your vet has the papers on the parents. BTW...what is the mix ??
 

durvish

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#43
I would assume the parents have been checked, as the are used for regular breeding as well. Also, since my pup was checked for Patella luxation before I picked him up, I would assume they would do that on the parents as well.

If you are going to breed then you can't assume. you will need to get it on paper, and provide that history ( on paper also ) to all new owners.
 

Julie

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#44
musictech said:
Fran,

If your so concerned about the pet population. Start shipping homeless pets to Asia. I hear dog is a real delicacy over there. You can fix two problems at once, hunger and pet overpopulation.

=)
What the..........?

This just sickening to say, especially on a dog forum where you know the rest
of us love our dogs and pets.
 
M

musictech

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#45
bubbatd said:
It's interesting that your vet has the papers on the parents. BTW...what is the mix ??
Not my vet, the vet of the people I got my pup from. Chiuaua and Pomeranian.

durvish said:
If you are going to breed then you can't assume. you will need to get it on paper, and provide that history ( on paper also ) to all new owners.
Absolutely, that is something I have to check into before I decide to breed my pup or not. I have the contact info, I just have to pick up the phone.

Julie said:
What the..........?

This just sickening to say, especially on a dog forum where you know the rest
of us love our dogs and pets.
Come on Julie, I was kidding. Just trying to lighten Fran up, I thought she was having a rough morning. Plus I think were a ways away from Jack Russel Nuggets at McDonalds. Hmm wonder if that comes with sweet and sour sauce. =P
 
M

musictech

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#47
It wasn't the Jack Russell McNuggets comment was it? =)

Your signature can be the tagline. Jack Russel McNuggets, one is just never enough. =)
 

Fran27

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#48
musictech said:
Fran,

If your so concerned about the pet population. Start shipping homeless pets to Asia. I hear dog is a real delicacy over there. You can fix two problems at once, hunger and pet overpopulation.

=)

What the ****??? What the hell is wrong with you??? You deserve to be banned for such a statement, this is a forum for dog LOVERS, not freaks who think it's fun to breed their dogs for the hell of it.

I'm reporting you now...
 

Boxer*Mom

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#50
just repeating myself since you made no acknowledgement that i posted it before.
what everyone is trying to get across to you is that designer breeding is not a cool thing to most of us. especially when there are no health certificates on the previous generations or the sire and dam to have the litter. preferably we think going to an animal shelter or rescue is the best option because those dogs need homes and will be spayed/neutered before leaving.
and your comment about shipping dogs to asia to be eaten was uncalled for and disgusting!! you obviously do not know how bad they are mistreated there.
 
M

musictech

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#51
Boxer*Mom said:
just repeating myself since you made no acknowledgement that i posted it before.
Oh no I saw it, it was just more of the same. However, your other threads I found helpful though. I had looked for the specific mix that I have now for about 3 months before I found him, and I looked in shelters as well. What I found was that some mixes are just as popular as purebred. Mine just happens to be the case.

Also, I am not sure what you mean by designer breeding. If you mean purposefully breeding dogs to bring out certain traits, the, then yeah, what I might end up doing would be considered designer breeding. Then again, I ask you, how is that different from the founders of the golden retriever, jack russell, and many other breeds did?

Finally, I am aware of the treatment of dogs. However, I would rather see a dog on a skewer than a starving child in the street.
 

Boxer*Mom

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#52
So someone sees a characteristic they want and they commence to breeding to "set" that trait (all the offspring or progeny have the trait as well). Once someone starts recording the breeding history or pedigrees of the dogs involved, a breed is created. Getting recognized by a registry like the AKC or UKC is generally a process of more documentation and numbers. The question marks start swirling because it takes alot of breeding to set characteristics, and to find individuals to continue the process. Those puppies that aren't "true to type" go somewhere. Taking homes that other dogs in the shelters might have a shot at or being euthanized (culled) because they didn't measure up. The process is simply not sensible in this day and age.

Even if you know FOR SURE which breeds are in him, and you know the parents VERY WELL...

You still don't know WHICH genes a puppy will inherit from WHICH breed -- and which genes will "trump" the others.

Lisa Peterson, spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club, bristles at the notion that any designer dog can boast a noble background and rejects the claim that designer dog mixes are any healthier than purebreds.

"None of the new designer dogs would qualify as purebreds," she says. "It would need a whole list of qualifications, including a parent club, generations of photographed, documented dogs, and generations of health records. It usually takes decades, if not centuries, to register a purebred."

She adds she has not seen any scientific study demonstrating that mixed breed dogs are any healthier than purebreds.

"We would say 'buyers beware' to customers who believe designer dogs are the best of both worlds," she says. "With a purebred, you know what kind of coat quality you're getting, what kind of temperament, what kind of gait … all of this is documented and guaranteed. With designer dogs, there is no guarantee how the puppies will turn out."

Peterson also warns that the popularity of a particular mix might encourage "backyard breeders" to take a stab at producing the novelty puppies. Left to amateurs, such puppy mills can lead to poorly bred pups and animal cruelty.
 
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Julie

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#53
musictech,
I find your attitude and your so called jokes repulsive, and in my opinion you should have no place on these forums.

Fran is not replying to you like that because she is having a bad day. It is your total lack of knowledge, after members that are more knowledgable than you have tried to explain things to you. I know you will never be helped, and it is the kind of people like you that are at the root of all the homeless animals.
And it sure looks like you tried to help her lighten up. :eek:

You really are a joke............a really bad one.

I am done with this thread too.
 
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#56
since I just joined the forums a few days ago, I don't want to get into an argument or anything. so I won't comment on anything musictech and others said except for the original post.

marking is very frustrating, indeed. the only thing I can suggest, is that if you catch your puppy in the act, spray him with some water. I know Coco doesn't like being sprayed with water, so he'll think twice before marking the sofa in front of me. however, there's still the problem of when you can't watch him. be persistent with the spraying, and hopefully, he'll get the point eventually. just make sure not to take him outside after spraying him, because he would be even colder and all that.
 

Sheba

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#57
Ok, lets see. BREEDING MUTTS IS LIKE MAKING THE PUGGLE OR COCKAPOO!
If you breed a mutt, whoo will adopt it? How many dogs get put to sleep a month?A DAY?Around 50 a day!Maybe even more! Sure, people may buy your dogs. What might happen to them then? They might get put in the shelter. What will happen if nobody buys them? They get put to sleep. It is a very sad thing, how the shelters do things.
Other than that rant to you, you can NEVER stop a male dog from marking his territory unless he is nuetered.
Once again, think about it logically. Not every person in the world absolutly loves dogs. They might just be a BYB and you might not even know it!
 

bubbatd

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#58
Tintin...at 7 months your dog should not be "marking " in the house.... a dog not trained will pee, but marking is usually an adult dog...specially if lifting his leg on a couch. Is he neutered ??? I've never owned a small breed , but have known so many who feel they can go wherever they please. Why ??
 
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#59
bubbatd said:
Tintin...at 7 months your dog should not be "marking " in the house.... a dog not trained will pee, but marking is usually an adult dog...specially if lifting his leg on a couch. Is he neutered ??? I've never owned a small breed , but have known so many who feel they can go wherever they please. Why ??
Small breeds mature quicker than a large breed so this means at 7 months they are capable of marking, by 12 months they are fully mature
 
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#60
Coco is trained. he knows not to pee. I mean, I could walk with him outside, he'll do all his business there, and then when he comes inside, he'll feel the need to mark. he's not neutered, by the way. when I catch him in the act of marking, I'll spray him with water. but the problem is, if I'm not there to supervise him....
 

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