what makes the perfect breeding dog

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by masterbaster, Aug 3, 2014.

  1. masterbaster

    masterbaster New Member

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    I am not planning on breeding any of my dogs, half my dogs are fixed and the others aren't yet old enough to get fixed. I was just hoping that maybe someone could clarify want a good dog to breed would be? Is it a dog with a good temperment or a dog that is a good specimen of it's breed? Could you justifiable breed a dog with a good temperment that might not be a great example of it's breed? Or could you breed a dog with a not so great temperment that is a great example of it's breed justifiably? I don't plan on breeding but maybe if these question were answered it could help other people decide on if their dogs should or should not be bred.
     
  2. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    A dog should be what the breed standard describes. And that is structure, over all look, and very much so, temperament. A dog should be a minimum of 2 years old and any genetic health testing that can be done, should be done. The pedigree should be examined to see what ancestors of the breeding dogs died from and how long was their life. If there are health issues that can not be tested for, due diligence should be made to not breed dogs with those issues if at all possible. (sometimes certain things are in all the lines and can not be avoided but an off setting should be attempted)

    Any minor faults should be off-set by the dog that it's being bred to, to attempt to improve the next generation. Any dog that is to be bred should be proven to be correct by a conformation show title which shows multiple judges have deemed him/her worthy. And/or be a real working dog, doing the job he/she was bred to do and have ancestors who also were physically and mentally able to do that job. If the conformation isn't good, it's not likely the dog can run long hours herding sheep. (as an example)

    One dog shouldn't be bred too many times as it contributes to a bottle neck in a population. And any faults or health issues, minor though they might be will be carried forward in all the lines. So, breeding in as much diversity, but from healthy, good examples of the breed should be striven for.

    To answer your question, I don't think a dog with a poor temperament OR poor conformation should be bred. A good example of the breed should be determined by experts in the breed.
     
  3. TrainerDanLee

    TrainerDanLee New Member

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    I couldn't put it even better myself. I like to breed dogs to see the best quality of my dog's features to be inherited to a pup. See the best of both dam and sir passed on and I will be happy. Not to mention seeing new pups always excites me.

    But when it comes to actually breeding, I always make sure that the dam and sir has no illness that can be passed down to pups. Also that my dam is in a healthy state to have and give birth. If you dog is a rut(born weak and small) like one of my dogs. I will not breed her, not even once.
     

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