Results of a shock collar on my chihuahua

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#41
^^^LOL - funny how often this happens - people thing they're training their dogs but it's actually the other way around.
 

adojrts

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#42
Yes, she had started this dog in agility but stopped when we started to working with her new dog. Plus this dog did flyball and now she is doing Rally with him.
After the fun match, she started to bring him when she comes to train her other dog for agility and we have started to work on her problem with him.
Training her to not repond when he barks at her for attention will be our biggest obstacle, that conditioned reponse is her problem, therefore being a dog problem.
lol she always jokes that her dogs get her into trouble with me.
 

ihartgonzo

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#43
Wow... I didn't know you HAD a Chihuahua! I hope you can find a more positive method because, as it sounds like you've discovered, a shock collar is simply a band-aid on a behavioral issue. It will only last for so long. It will only work in so many situations. It doesn't actually treat the problem, and I have heard way too many horror stories about shock collars to ever resort to them or trust them.

Amazing post, Carrie!
 
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Squishy22

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#45
Wow... I didn't know you HAD a Chihuahua! I hope you can find a more positive method because, as it sounds like you've discovered, a shock collar is simply a band-aid on a behavioral issue. It will only last for so long. It will only work in so many situations. It doesn't actually treat the problem, and I have heard way too many horror stories about shock collars to ever resort to them or trust them.

Amazing post, Carrie!
I enjoy large dogs as well as small dogs;). They do have a special place in my heart!
 

DanL

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#46
I hope you can find a more positive method because, as it sounds like you've discovered, a shock collar is simply a band-aid on a behavioral issue. It will only last for so long. It will only work in so many situations. It doesn't actually treat the problem, and I have heard way too many horror stories about shock collars to ever resort to them or trust them.
Daisy must be the exception to the rule. We had a behavior issue with her dive bombing the back door- literally shaking the entire room as 100lbs of dog launched at the door to get our attention to come in. We tried all kinds of ways to prevent her from doing this, but because it always happened when we were inside, often not in the room, we had to take drastic measures. Not only was it a behavior issue, it was potentially dangerous as the door she was diving at is all glass. I borrowed an e-collar for a week from someone I know. I put her outside, as soon as she started to jump at the door, I zapped her hard, with almost the highest level the collar could do. It scared the crap out of her, and guess what? She didn't jump on the door again that day. The 2nd day, same thing. She has never jumped on the door since that 2nd day. Problem solved. The next step was to prevent her from breaking down the screen door to get outside. I went outside with the other dogs, and left her inside. As soon as she jumped at the door, I zapped her. It took one time for that behavior to stop. She's never done either again. Once we had the behavior stopped, we taught her how to ring a bell to come inside, and she taught herself that if she goes to the door and noses the handle to jiggle it, she'll be let outside.

I don't think an ecollar is something you should do for general obedience training, but for behavior issues, if you've tried other ways and they haven't worked, it's a good tool.
 

mrose_s

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#47
If he yipped and it was obvious that he was in pain, then you have the collar on a setting thats too high for him. If none of the lower setting seem to work for him, then the shock collar isnt the way to go. Maybe you can try one with an unpleasant noise instead?

Its not good that your other dog is attacking him like that. All thats going to do is make him into a nervous wreck.

I hope everything works out for you!!!!!!
It automatically goes up in settings, he hasn't hardly barked more than once since. He barks once and then stops. Which is great.
I pushed and pushed and pushed with training, but nothing is going to work unless my whole family got on board... and ofcourse, they wouldn't. Plus he barks when we are away, something we can't fix if we arn't there. I'm not trying to give us an excuse, I hate it, I wish we didn't use it. And its not something I'd do again unless necesary.

As for Buster, he's stopped now, he is back to normal. I think it must have been that one time? God I don't know. I know its not good what happened, and I don't justify it either. But it happened, and it hasn't happened since. Buster is a snarky *******, I can quite easily see him taking advantage of a moment of vulnerability.

Like I said before though, I don't like it. But I'd rather it then loose our dogs.
 
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#48
Once we had the behavior stopped, we taught her how to ring a bell to come inside, and she taught herself that if she goes to the door and noses the handle to jiggle it, she'll be let outside.
I'm glad the ecollar worked for you, but for anyone reading this who has a similar problem - maybe you should START by teaching the dog to ring a bell, and he'd learn to prefer that than slamming the door.
 

PWCorgi

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#49
I didnt know walmart carried them either. It was only 40 bucks. BUT, I am going to get on the net and look for a bark collar that isnt remote controlled. Thats the only problem I have with the one from walmart.
I'd be EXTREMELY careful when looking into these. My mom bought one when the corgis were younger and barking A LOT and she thought she would be putting it on them (YEAH FRIGGIN RIGHT!). Anyhow, it wasn't a cheap one, but all you had to do was set it with a little force on the ground and it would go off. Like if a dog lowered it's head too fast to the ground it would go off. For a while I kept it hidden in one of my dresser drawers (away from my mom in case she decided to give it a try) and every time I shut the dresser drawer it would go off. That's not teaching the dog anything and hurting/confusing them in the process.
FYI: We did use a citronella collar on Mollie when she first came to us (my little sister was a baby, so it's much like your situation) and it worked wonders.

Carrie, it's great to see you around again. And :hail: as usual. :)
 

Labra

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#50
I haven't read the thread, but an electric collar for a Chihuahua? a-friggin-mazing. Where is that roll eyes icon when you need it?
 
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#51
^^^You don't think a chihuahua can bark?? Many breed discriptions suggest them as alert/guard dogs. They have the reputation of being "yappy little ankle biters."
 

Suzzie

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#52
if a shock collar is hurting the dog, it's up too high. I've tested these collars on myself on EVERY setting. It's sure surprising, more than anything. Like a static shock after you've rubbed your feet on carpet. If it hurts you, then DUH you need to turn it down at least one level for large dogs and several more for small ones. I'm pretty wimpy so if I thought it was painful, I would not use it either.

and spray collars spray citronella, not lemon juice.

i'm amazed so many people are against shock collars, but have no problem jamming dozens of metal prongs into their neck or wailing on the collar to choke their pooch. There do seem to be a lot of people more intent on electrocuting their pet than learning how to properly train it or use a shock collar safely.

the problem with the above posted method is that my cattle dog mix is too smart for that. You are rewarding him for barking. And he knows it. As he wants a treat, he'll continue to bark for hours, now that he knows barking = treat. I'd rather reward for never starting barking at all. The less attention he pays to the fence, passersby, etc, the more lavish the praise and treats. Once a dog is already used to barking incessantly, though, there is not much going to stop it.
 

Dekka

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#53
i'm amazed so many people are against shock collars, but have no problem jamming dozens of metal prongs into their neck or wailing on the collar to choke their pooch. There do seem to be a lot of people more intent on electrocuting their pet than learning how to properly train it or use a shock collar safely.
You will find the majority here to not reccomend prong or choke collars to train dogs. In my past I have used all such tools, and found that they only ended up getting in the way of me training my dog.

I am not hugely against shock collars. But I disagree (and I have used them on me) they hurt. If it didn't hurt why would the dog stop barking? If used for barking as a last resort vs the hand held ones, as you are not relying on a human's timing.
 

corgipower

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#54
but all you had to do was set it with a little force on the ground and it would go off. Like if a dog lowered it's head too fast to the ground it would go off. For a while I kept it hidden in one of my dresser drawers (away from my mom in case she decided to give it a try) and every time I shut the dresser drawer it would go off. That's not teaching the dog anything and hurting/confusing them in the process.
Well, that's one reason why I would prefer the remote collar over the automatic bark collar if it comes to that choice.

If it didn't hurt why would the dog stop barking?
Well, by that logic, why would using positive methods work to stop barking Just because something works doesn't mean it's painful.
 

DanL

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#55
I'm glad the ecollar worked for you, but for anyone reading this who has a similar problem - maybe you should START by teaching the dog to ring a bell, and he'd learn to prefer that than slamming the door.
Yeah, and in the meantime, she breaks the door, seriously injures herself, and causes 1500 in damage to my house. It wasn't going to happen. It's not like we didn't try things prior to the 2 days of ecollar use. There is a big difference in a 30lb dog jumping on a door and a 100lb dog jumping on a door, and sometimes you can't spend a month training when one breach of the training by the dog could result in serious injury to her. It's not like we were teaching her not to counter surf or trash pick.
 

Dekka

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#56
no positive methods work because not barking is rewarding ;)

If you add something the dog doesn't like to stop an action, it has to be sufficiently aversive to cause the animal to stop. If it doesn't hurt and the dog loves barking why would it stop. If I love talking and someone taps me, I am not likely to stop. If they pinched me every time I spoke it may work. That is the whole premise behind using aversives. They must be unpleasant enough the animal would rather not do the behavior than face the consequence.

So if you don't think it hurts, why DO you think a dog who loves to bark stops when you put a shock collar on? If its only a mild stimulation like a 'tap' it shouldn't stop the dog should it?
 

corgipower

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#57
So if you don't think it hurts, why DO you think a dog who loves to bark stops when you put a shock collar on? If its only a mild stimulation like a 'tap' it shouldn't stop the dog should it?
I can say that when I put the ecollar on my self, it didn't hurt me. I can say that the dogs I have used ecollars on have not displayed any indication that it hurt them, since I am not in their body or mind, I can never be certain that it didn't hurt, nor can I say that a sit position doesn't hurt or that the couch is comfortable for them;)

If the ecollar works but doesn't cause pain, I believe that it acts as an interrupter. It may cause a mild discomfort, which is a far cry from pain.
 

Dekka

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#58
Hmm I don't buy that. Otherwise all dogs would simply learn to bark through the interrupter. I know it would HAVE to be unpleasant or painful to stop Scandal from barking. I do know many dogs DO learn to bark through them, the tend to be the more impervious to pain types. So I see a correlation between the two.

I have used them on me titronics (sp?) and petsafe. BOTH hurt. We stood around none of us could hold in on past 5 (I never got past 3...I don't like shocks) 3 was much worse than a shock from static electricity (which I hate)

I would like to point out I did use an e collar on Kaiden, before I dropped the use of aversive in training. I am not one of those people who goes on at length but has never had any experience. I know many obed trainers who use these methods exclusively to train dogs (won't go there) but they don't ever try to claim it doesn't hurt.
 

JennSLK

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#59
In my opinion shock collars are great, just like princh/prong collars when used PROPPERLY by someone who knows what they are doing. They are like every tool out there. Great if used right. Horrible if used wrong.
 
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