House Breaking a Dog w/o being mean??

SKITTLES1

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#21
Stillll going....

I've read a thousand things but still having issues with my pup. She's 4 months old so I know she is still young but it gets very frustrating cleaning up the pee/poo. I take her out Constantly...today, she was outside for an hour before I brought her in and she peed on the carpet 15 minutes later. I was hoping to schedule her feedings but she wouldn't eat and my vet advised against that due to her size (under 2lbs). I always put her in her crate when I'm not around and she can actually hold it for 10+ hours. I know this only because when I was initially trying to train her on pads I wouldn't put her down unless on the pads and she never went. I only wanted to pad train her because she Hates the rain...literally curls up under me shivering and won't go. I fear winter. I felt it would make life so much better to use the pads...ONLY if she had to. I know several people that take their dogs outside to go but also use the pads for when they are at work and such.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
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#22
Couldn't this get put up as a sticky? So many requests for housetraining....

House Training

House training your dog is simple if you follow a few basic rules.

1) The puppy must have NO time unsupervised in your home. NONE.
If you are not directly watching the puppy, it should be in the
crate, or outside in a safe area. You MUST watch the puppy at ALL
times when loose in the house. Use baby gates, crates, or tie the
leash to your belt.

2) The puppy should sleep inside the crate by your bedside.
This way you can hear if the puppy should happen to need to go out
during the night.

3) You must go WITH the puppy outside for ALL trips for
elimination. You must have treats with you. When the puppy is
urinating, say "GO PEE PEE" in a nice praise tone of voice the entire
time. When she is finished, pop the treat into her mouth at once, and
praise praise praise. This should be something she gets at no other
time, like tiny pieces of string cheese or boiled chicken. Same for
defecation. Say "GO POOP" while she is going, and food reward and
praise afterwards. You must observe and reward ALL outdoor potty time.

4) Keep a schedule. Feed at the same time, and walk outside at
the same times. Your pup needs at least 4 trips outdoors each day,
and 5 is probably better. Pup needs to go out at wake up time, lunch
time, 4-5 PM, after dinner or any other meals, and before bed.

5) Use a key word each time you go out. I say "Let's go out!!"
in a happy tone of voice each time I'm opening the door to go out with the dog.

6) If you catch the puppy IN THE ACT of eliminating in your
house, CLAP YOUR HANDS, say AH AH, OUTSIDE!! And immediately rush her
outside. If she finishes there, do your usual food reward and praise.

The keys to getting your dog reliably housetrained are:

SUPERVISION: NO loose time in the house if you are not watching

REWARDS: ALL outdoor elimination MUST be observed
and rewarded. If you only do this ONE thing, your puppy will get housetrained.

PATIENCE: Anger and punishment have no place in dog
training. Elimination is a natural and pleasurable experience for
your dog. You can teach her to not soil your house, but punishment
will NOT help. It will only teach the dog to hide when she needs to eliminate.

If you have applied these techniques carefully for 4 weeks and you are still finding spots or piles after the fact, it's time for stronger measures. Roll up a newspaper and fasten both ends with a rubber band. Keep it handy. The very next time you find a spot of a pile that the dog has left behind, whip out that newspaper, and hit YOURSELF over the head firmly several times as you repeat "I FORGOT TO WATCH MY PUPPY".

Works every time.

:D

I love :) the newspaper over your own head!!! I also do exactly what you advise, and have so , for the past 30 years. This method always works!. Never, ever, ever leave your puppy or even your "new" older dog unattended until he/she has shown consistent behavior (going potty outside). This same method also works for "chewers".
 

brosen

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#23
at the risk of being redundant, here is my personal method. using it i have trained two puppies to be almost 100% reliable within only about 10 days, and everyone who received these instructions from me and has stuck to them has had great success within one to two weeks.

it's all about supervision, a strict routine, consistency and lots of praise. :)

you get yourself a crate, a piece of paper and a pen.


I have some trouble now with my crate trained puppy- who is about 15 weeks old. Now she will go ok into the crate, do her business outside reliably well - but the problem i am having is that she is waking up in the middle of the night and whining and scratching til you let her outside, pee a minute drop and then be very happy to go back to bed in her crate.

Is she doing this because she just wants to see us? 2:30 and 4:30 in the morning is really really early.

We have her on a feeding schedule, with the last feeding being at 6 PM. she is taken out 3 times after that, so there is no way she could have to go bathroom 3 times in a night as well.

Is there something we can do? we tried crating her with her housemate for bedtime- putting in a clock and a piece of our clothing. All for naught apparantly.
 

Doberluv

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#24
15 weeks is still pretty young. She may well feel the urge in the middle of the night still. Her bladder isn't full grown yet. Three times is a little excessive. Another thing....is she peeing a scanty amount at other times? I'd get a vet to check her for a bladder infection. Frequent, scanty urination is a sign of an infection.

If she's going right back in her crate afterward and not playing or hanging out with you, I don't think it's for attention. Get her checked by a vet. And then go with it for a few more weeks. She'll get past this stage soon. Let us know!
 

brosen

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#25
Puppy - housetraining

i had her to the vet for a check up and they said every thing looks normal.
should i put her in a room away from everyone and let her cry it out?

& no, to your question, she pees a 'regular' amount at other times. I have watched very closely. she is a teeny tiny dog.. would that make a difference?
 
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#26
Hi Guys. When i first got my pup (Shep) a few weeks ago I went a little crazy with the Pet Training Books (Guess I thought I'd become the next "Dog Whisperer" or something). But guess what? Most of those books were only useful in helping to pick up those little messes my little guy left around the house! :lol-sign: So I started searching forums like these for weeks picking up little tips and tricks (much thanks to all u guys who had good info)

Anyways, I finally stumbled on this site that by far has the best info I've seen anywhere else. Answers ALL your dog training issues. So take a look..
Cool it with the spamming.
 
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#27
I absolutely hate it
-I could not supervise my dog that long, infact i just about 12+ hours she could roam around the house and cause trouble.

-I moved to a place where there was no lawn, she's been used to peeing on lawn for the last SEVEN YEARS OF HER LIFE

-she is NOW used to peeing on a removable mat in the house for her to pee on + a park outside my house(far), but sometime gets accidents on the floor board for w/e reasons,I take her to walks and she'd pee on places that other dogs peed on,i've also trained her to understad what the word "PEE" means

-after a year,which is now. there's finally a lawn that the builder placed,with fences around.Im now trying to get her to pee there, i simply run through a hole in the fence with my dog,she LOVES that place,it's a huge lawn just outside my house,but she only runs around wild and would not focus on peeing

-The pee command that i trained her to do is working though on that new lawn, but since she never ever pees on places that's never been peed on before,it is absolutely impossible.

Anyone think i could do some kind of routine to get her to pee outside that brand new lawn slowly ? I know for sure that she'll soon be corrupted with the idea of peeing on that matt.because she would "miss"the matt,not to mention constantly changing a new mat
 

Mayasmydobe

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#28
They make this liquid stuff for potty training that has special endorphins or whatever. I got a bottle at a feed store for like 6 bucks. What I do is put a few drops on the ground where I want Maya to potty and she is attracted to pee in that spot.
In fact, I havent put the drops down for several weeks now and she STILL potties withing 2 feet of where I originally was putting the drops.
 
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#29
Housebreaking dogs...

I don't know what to say on how to housebreak a dog without discipline...essentially regardless of the technique it is pavlovian conditioning--through repetition, the neural pathways associated with proper house-broken behavior are reinforced...I don't know of any way to get around this unless we start putting sockets in the bag of our dog's heads and download instructions into their brain aka The Matrix!
 
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#30
It all comes down to each person's definition of the word "discipline". My dogs are 'disciplined' all day long, every time they set a paw out of line. However, what do i mean by discipline? Many people would read this and assume my dogs are beaten, or shut away or something similar. By discipline, my own personal definition is "removal, prevention or taking possession of that thing which the dog most wants". In other words, if i am going out the door and my dog knocks me out the way (which doesn't happen, but makes a good example) then my slight voice sound of "Oi" or "Psh" and then the door is shut before the dog gets through, and i walk away. i may turn around within a split second and reapproach the door, but this whole process (lasting less than a second) is what i call "Discipline". The same goes for anything, if i tell a dog to lay down and wait for me to put the food down, and as i am reaching down to put the bowl on the floor, if the dog moves a muscle (not necessarily getting up) then i instanteously put the bowl back on the worktop and walk away. Then i say stay or down again (whatever it is he didn't do) and re-offer the food. This again is discipline and puts the dog in a state of positive stress, where the mind is open to LEARNING. This is as far as discipline needs to go in 95% of cases, and with 95% of dogs, IF the timing is PERFECT.

The way i see it, the worse your timing, the harsher your punishment needs to be to do the job, and i don't believe in punishment at all, never mind harsh ones. One of the most under-publicised features of successful dog training and ownership is the SPEED with which you NOTICE and REACT to the slightest movement or signal from your dog. The quicker you do this, the more accurate and obedient the dog will naturally become. Above all, if you miss your chance to correct something, FORGET it, the time will come again soon enough, and next time you better be awake :)
 
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#32
She Goes At Night

SO i have a one and a half year basset hound that is potty trained when we are home. (yes i know it sounds funny) but then when we leave or go to sleep she just goes inside. we used to crate train her but she would go in the crate and it just felt wrong to leave her in there sitting in her own pee and poop so instead we have confined her to the kitchen and dining room area which has a stair case leading to upstairs. well needless to say when i come home shes peed and pooped on the stairs. i dont know what to do about this problem. we take her out at night right before bed and no matter what she pees in the middle of the night by the door. ive woken up a few times when she was doing it and she doesnt whine or anything. Im a full time college student and me and my fiance both work. PLEASE HELP! im tired of waking up in the middle of the night and stepping in a cold puddle of pee. any suggestions??
 

Maxy24

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#33
was the crate too big for her? The crate should have been just big enough for her to stand up, lay down and turn around in. If it's too big then they will potty in the crate.
 
R

RedyreRottweilers

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#34
1) gate her in the room with you so you can hear her get up if she needs to go out
2) or get a larger crate, put a nice cushy bed in it, and let her sleep in there.
3) use the crate when you leave
4) Use a baby gate to restrict her access to the stairway
5) Teach her how to ask to go out. Each time you are going to go out with her, sit her at the door, and in a happy excited tone of voice, ask her "Do you want to go OUT?" smile. Try to encourage her to woof, or touch the door with her paw. Get her all exited and bouncy, and then open the door and toss out a cookie for her to run after.

Basically, use your head. :D Figure out ways to REINFORCE her for going outdoors, eliminating outdoors, and going to the door to ask out. HELP her get happy and excited when she goes to the door by playing fun little games, and encouraging her to get happy when she is near the door.

Prevent her ability to soil the house when you can. Use confinement and supervision to your advantage to help the dog do the right thing.

Good luck.
 

vanesa

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#35
Hello..
I guess we all been there at some point, puppy training.
Back to basics: Lots of praise, give the puppy about 30 min. outside after eating to evacuate. Also lots of praise when they do it outside. I think supervision would be the key also.
One thing that I did was that I read a lot of puppy training. That help a lot not only to the puppy but to me as well.
 

kcbell1973

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#36
positive potty training

How do you house break a dog with out yelling and screaming. I love positive reinforcement training not negative training. What's the propper way to do this?
I had lots of trouble with my Casper when we tried to potty train him. Like many I had learned to spank and punish when I saw a mess, and that just wasn't working. I suggest you visit www.cresswellsonlinedogtraining.com. The lessons are easy and positive on everything.
Casper was just a little over a year old when I started using these lessons and he spent most of his time in a kennel or outside on a chain because I couldn't risk him messing up our floors or tearing up our furniture. (Casper is a pit bull mix and they tend to not fear doing their business in thier bedding so we did a lot of cleaning up after him :rolleyes:.) But it only took two weeks following Dove's techniques to be able to let him be on his own while I am at work and not be afraid of what I will find when I get home.
Your puppy might take a little longer to train because puppys simply cannot hold it that long, but there are some great techniques in there for puppies too.
 

rosesmom

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#37
I trained mine by going by the Training article on this site. http://www.goldenrayyorkies.com You have to go to the information page and there are links to the training. Sorry I don't know the exact page. I use this for everything but it is really good on potty training.
 
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#38
I don't think an 11-week old puppy is being "aggressive." I think he's playing, as all 11-week old puppies do.

I also HIGHLY support neutering dogs, but I would never suggest getting an 11-week old neutered. Wait a few months.
 

pitbull33

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#39
I have read many articles regarding training your puppy .

Our puppy is currently 11 weeks old and the only really thing that bugs me is his continuously wanting to bite.
We have had his for 4 weeks now he loves his food , i mean what puppy don't.
I take him out every couple to 3 hours.
He can go for nearly 2 hours being on his own , as he will need to go for longer periods when i recover from a broken ankle.
But he always seems to get hyper and then that's when his biting starts at first i did not think it would last that long , but he really is a very dominating dog, of which we are trying to get him out of that.
My wife is the more experienced of the two of us even thought this will be my 4th dog.
But it really is stressing us out as he is a truly gorgeous looking dog, he enjoys his walks, even though he tries so hard when people are just walking by to be very sociable, but not every one is animal orientated.
But his biting is beginning to get out of hand
is time to starting puppy obedience training (6 or 7 week old )
if you wanna learn more aggression in puppies, this is a good site:http://www.dogobediencetrainingtip.com/stop_puppy_biting.html
 
R

rayter

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#40
Patience is a virtue when it comes to housebreaking a dog.

Try this method: Have newspapers on the ground next to the door to backyard. Every time you see him/her starting to do something immediately put him on the newspapers. He will learn to go on the news papers by himself. As soon as this happens take the news papers away. He will go to the door wondering where the newspapers are. When you notice this put him outside and watch him. If he goes outside praise him like crazy.
 
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