Coonhounds?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by CharlieDog, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    At my work, we foster dogs, and one dog is a Treeing Walker Coonhound (his name is Toby, but I call him Fred half the time, seriously :p)

    Anyway, I know hounds aren't for me, too independent, but I was wondering about them. What are they like to live with? How are they to train?

    Also, what breed is it that everyone on here covets, but can't have because they only go to cougar and bear hunters? I want to say Lightfoot Coonhounds, but I can't find anything on the internet about them. Is there a website, or are they sold by reputation and word of mouth?
     
  2. lucyloo2

    lucyloo2 New Member

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    We used to have an English Red Tick Coon Hound and he was such a goof ball, we loved him to pieces. I didn't find him too independant, he loved being with us, and loved to play play play!!! I found that he had hard time focusing though, and we never took him off leash because if he picked up a scent he'd be gone. If we ever get another one I would want to work with a professional who is used to training Coon Hounds.
     
  3. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    Where's DrMom when you need her :p
     
  4. bnwalker2

    bnwalker2 My house is a zoo

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    I fostered an English Coonhound for awhile when I worked at the shelter. I loved her, but she had a BIG voice and liked to use it! She was very friendly, and very snuggly. She was well behaved in the house, but of course outside she had a mind (or I guess nose I should say!) or her own. She was great with the other animals, except around meal time... she was extremely food aggressive.

    And then there's Scooter. His mom was a Beagle/Sheltie... so said the owners, and we think he's got some Coonhound in him as well. He's pretty much exactly like Sadie (the Coonhound above), but is only slightly food aggressive with the other dogs.
     
  5. Danegirl2208

    Danegirl2208 New Member

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    I have a 5 year old spayed Red tick (English)/ Treeing walker coonhound mix...

    Chloe is a great dog though as much as I love her I can't say I really have the desire to own another hound again.....she is stubborn, and independent and aloof unless she wants your attention...typical coonhound. She is very selective with other dogs. Some she likes, others she wants NOTHING to do with. Her and Freckles don't get along though, and we have had quite a couple "disagreements" around here.

    She is pretty mellow indoors, she HAS to make her rounds around the house everytime she comes back in...nose to the ground- searching for long lost crumbs in every nook and cranny of the house :rolleyes: Drives me crazy, but she is just being a hound.

    As far as training, if you have food she will be your best friend....She is ridiculously food motivated. She is very intelligent and picks up things fast. She'll stay focused as long as you have a treat in your hand...otherwise she'll lose interest pretty fast. Overall she listens well, she has her moments though, and I obviously can never trust her off lead. If she gets out, might as well pull-up a chair and wait, becuase she isn't coming back until she has found what she is looking for.

    I really wish I hunted or something, I am sure she would love to have a job to do. But sadly their aren't many coonhounds in the phoenix suburbs :p

    this is a city dogs idea of "treeing" lmao
    [​IMG]
     
  6. drmom777

    drmom777 Bloody but Unbowed

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    Sigh, i just posted a long complicated reply, but the computer burped, so now I have to start over.

    I don't think idependance is typical of coonhounds at all. These are not pack hounds like foxhounds, they hunt singly or in small groups and have historically lived close with their owners.

    Uncle Fred is very loving and loyal. He obviously worships the ground I walk on, it's really very flattering. In the house he is usually found within a few feet, not right underfoot, but where he can keep an eye on me. He is a great family dog. He is kind, extremely gentle with kids, non-destructive, and playful. He is not an obedience or agility prospect.

    I guess it depends on what you want a dog for--he is the best dog I have ever had. He is naturally a great family dog, and gets along well with anyone he knows or anyone I tell him he has to. Otherwise he is pretty aloof with strangers. While not stupid, he is certainly not a brilliant intellect, and, though he enjoys obedience, he isn't really great at it.

    The challenges of owning a coonhound include dealing with the BIG voice, and providing sufficient exersize. I believe that if you left him alone all day every day he might let the world know about his woes. As it is he has no woe, so the neighborhood thinks he is really cool.

    Actually he has turned out to be a good watchdog. he has a low howl for people he knows, and a much different one for strangers. Once someone tried to steal our bikes, and Uncle Fred raised such a ruckus the neighbors called the police. We came home to find police swarming around, but the bikes were intact. The cable was partly cut. My neighbors said they called because their roof was vibrating.

    When I was stuck in bed trying to heal my back for six weeks, Uncle Fred took up watch at the foot of my bed. He only left to go out to the bathroom. he had to be coaxed to come down for meals and exercize. Every so often he would very seriously andd thoroughly wash my feet.

    Even as an unneutered male he is a good dog park dog. I would describe him as dominant but not aggressive. He doesn't tolerate dominate behavior from other dogs, but picks no fights.

    When I was bitten in the park, and when Mini has gotten attacked he responded the same way. He comes flying over, roaring, knocks the dog off its feet, pins it, and roars continuously in its face. He has never bitten one yet

    Most of the time when he is outside he is just silly. We can be walking along and all of a sudden he howls and drops into the bow position and dances around. At the dog park he gets dogs to play by bowing, dancing, and doing aerial 360s, all while "AROOING" his head off.

    He is good buddies with Mini, and best friends with one of my cats, Smedislav. They sleep together in the afternoons, following the sunny spot around my bed.

    All in all, I think coonhounds are the most underrated family pet dogs there are. I myself would never have one if I hadn't purposely fostered a dog i thought I would be unlikely to want to keep. I would have kept right on walking past the hound cages all my life.

    I love Mini, she is sweet and funny, but she does not bond with people the way Uncle Fred does. He seems to feel a responsibility to watch over all of us that is characteristic of good guardian dogs.

    The hounds we want and can't have are Idaho Lightfoot English. There is no website, there arent;' enough for the people who want them, and they breed for their own purposes, not to satisfy demand, as far as I can tell. Oh well.
     
  7. Sweet72947

    Sweet72947 Squishy face

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    My experiences with hounds at rescue have taught me these truths:
    1. Many types of hounds like to voice their feelings. AROOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!

    2. Young hounds tend to be quite full of energy. A young hound of the larger breeds is akin to a furry wrecking ball and will take pleasure in mowing down small children in their exuberance. :p

    3. They have a mind of their own. They want to do what they want to do. I have found that their attitude towards training is "make me." This may be due to the fact that many of the hounds I see in rescue are ex hunting dogs.
     
  8. drmom777

    drmom777 Bloody but Unbowed

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    Uncle Fred was 9 months when he came home. He has never mowed down a child. He bounces up, baying, and then gets into the bow position if he wants to play. He never jumps up, ever.

    Uncle Fred doesn'y respond top training with "make me" but with 'Who, me? Why? How? What? Who, Me?????' He does way better with active things than passive, heel is easier than down, for example.

    Incidentally, he is not very food motivated at all.

    Mini, on the other hand will try absolutely anything for a treat.
     

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