Choosing the right herding breed?

Tessi1014

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#1
Hello everyone. I am looking to find out a little more between a few herding breeds. I've had a Heeler mix and two Aussie Shepherds but all three were very atypical of the breeds and I think I may have just been getting lucky with calm dogs! Lol. I'm hoping a few of you here have experience with the breeds I'm now looking into and can give me a better idea if they're right for me at this point in my life.

I'm looking for a dog that works closely with me, biddable, I love Velcro dogs, I don't want an overly friendly towards strangers dog(will not leave me for the first person he sees), I don't mind snarky attitudes too much(all my herders have had an attitude and a half), has an off switch, not a very vocal dog (can't stand constant barks, prefer a quiet worker). I am hoping to find a dog that will do trials with me or play sports or at the very least accompany us on hikes/trips to the ocean etc. He will be an inside dog part of the family first and foremost. We have two small mixed breed females and my girl is the most stubborn, what's in it for me attitude but loves everyone and if given the chance will leave with the first person to say hi to her

The breeds I have been looking into mainly because we are in a very hot dry climate and Id prefer a wash and wear dog are ACDs, Kelpie, Border Collie, Mcnab (not too familiar with the whole BC/Mcnab debate), Aussie Shepherd, Koolie, Catahoula Leopard Dog.
 

Southpaw

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#2
You described my ACD. I think the most atypical thing about him is that he is VERY social and friendly towards strangers, but his focus is on me and his "job" first and foremost - so he never blows me off to visit with people, he never gets distracted by people, but when it's time to say hi he is Mr. Social. So I think even that attitude would probably fit what you want, but again, my understanding from other people with the breed is that they tend to be more aloof and not such people sluts like mine is. And, I probably encouraged this in him too as a puppy since my other dog is very nervous with strangers and I wanted to avoid that.

He is incredibly easy to train and work with and tries so hard to do everything I ask him. Very in tune and focused on me. Could probably go without ever needing to put a leash on him because he doesn't stray far from me ever. He has a lot of drive and energy and would go 100 hours a day if I asked him to, but he's super calm in the house and can easily go a day or more with minimal exercise and he doesn't go stir crazy or anything. I work full time, he gets left alone for 10 hours a day, hasn't needed a crate since he was 6 months old. He's a really great house dog with the ability to completely turn ON and go nuts.

As he gets older (he's 14 months) he's becoming more of a "watch dog" and will bark if there's activity outside of our house, but stops when told. And I don't mind an alert bark. Otherwise he's not vocal unless he's amped up and frustrated - teasing him with a toy gets him to bark, restrained recalls, etc. He's good with other dogs and has always lived with a couple, the snark does come out a little bit though if another dog gets too close to his toys.

He is a disc dog, that is our primary sport and he's done a couple competitions. We recently started agility as well and so far he's totally digging that too. He is my adventure buddy, I take him hiking a lot and he loves it! He's just all around a really great active companion with the potential to excel in a lot of sports if I wanted to pursue it.

I was considering a border collie as well but ultimately I found BC's tend to be more sensitive and quirkier and I think noise phobias are more prevalent too. I wanted a harder temperament than what I saw in BCs.
 

Tessi1014

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#3
Thank you for the reply. My Heeler mix was the perfect dog, acted more Heeler than Aussie. I wasn't sure if maybe one of the other breeds would be an even better fit for me or not, I do love ACDs. What do you mean BC are sensitive? Sensitive to corrections or to stimulus? Thanks again!
 

Southpaw

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#4
Sensitive to corrections is more what I'm referring to. It's not something I thought I'd mind, until living with a very soft dog who would shut down if I used a stern voice. I didn't want to seek out a breed more prone to sensitivity. I could smack my ACD in the head with a 2x4 and he wouldn't care.

I've never lived with a BC, so take it with a grain of salt... it's just my impression of them and what I've seen described.
 
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