Chaz breed info (add yours)

corgipower

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#21
I agree, other than the size. The standard goes to 26 inches. My dog is around 25.5 inches, and is pretty average for a male. I've seen many males larger at FR trials & seminars, SchH seminars, and in the show ring, but I've not seen many that were that much smaller than him. I think 22-24 would be a fair size range for bitches, but I'd not fault one a bit larger.
From Belgium Shepherd dog FCI standard
Height at withers:

The ideal weight at withers is on average - 62 cm for males

- 58 cm for females.

Limits: 2 cm less, 4 cm more.
62 cm = 24.4 in
58 cm = 22.8 in

The limits would be
males - 23.6 to 26 inches
females - 22 to 24.4 inches
 

stafinois

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#22
From Belgium Shepherd dog FCI standard


62 cm = 24.4 in
58 cm = 22.8 in

The limits would be
males - 23.6 to 26 inches
females - 22 to 24.4 inches

That's pretty close to the AKC standard.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Males are 24 to 26 inches in height; females are 22 to 24 inches; measurement to be taken at the withers. Males under 23 inches or over 27 inches and females under 21 inches or over 25 inches are to be disqualified.
 

stafinois

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#23
American Staffordshire Terrier

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: From the AKC breed standard: The American Staffordshire Terrier should give the impression of great strength for his size, a well put-together dog, muscular, but agile and graceful, keenly alive to his surroundings. He should be stocky, not long-legged or racy in outline. His courage is proverbial.

acceptable colors: Any color, solid, parti, or patched is permissible, but all white, more than 80 per cent white, black and tan, and liver not to be encouraged.

Temperament: Lively, very friendly with humans, strange and familiar. Particularly good with children. Can be dog aggressive and prey driven with other animals.

Height: 17 to 19 inches

Weight: 35 - 70 lbs

Health Problems: Cerebral Ataxia, Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia, slipping hocks, subaortic stenosis, mitral valve dysplasia, dilitated cardiomyopathy, allergies

Exercise: Needs a fair amount

Life Expectancy: 10 - 16 years depending on bloodlines

Grooming: Very little

What to look for in a breeder: Look for a breeder that actually DOES something with their dogs, preferably both show and performance. Make sure the dogs are tested for Cerebral Ataxia, or cleared by parentage. Don't take their word for it, ask for proof! Other minimums should be OFA hips and elbows, OFA cardio clear by a cardiologist

Ideal living conditions: Indoors with the family

"Ideal" owner: Active owner with a thick skin in an area without BSL

Trainability: High

Other traits: Excellent with people of all ages! May not be good with other animals. The dogs do well in most dog sports that the breed is allowed to compete in. A nice Jack-of-all-trades breed

Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:

Staffordshire Terrier Club of America - Official Website - STCA

She's not in the breeder directory anymore as she has passed away, but here is the website for Grant's breeder: Hartagold AmStaffs/APBTs

Other breeders that I would consider a dog from...

Welcome to carmichael's kennel
B'Dazzled American Staffordshire Terriers
Retro Staffs - American Staffordshire Terriers
Titletown American Staffordshire Terriers-Versatile Amstaffs, Conformation Dog Shows, Obedience Trials
 

pitbullpony

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#24
South african boerboel

SOUTH AFRICAN BOERBOEL​

South African Boerboel - Standard and characteristics listed from the SABT/SABBA - South African Boerboel Breeders Association

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: (Dutch East India Company) sent Jan van Riebeeck to establish a trading post at the southern tip of Africa. On arrival in the Cape in 1652, his trusty Bullenbijter was at his side. The colonists that followed Van Riebeeck to the Cape also brought their biggest and strongest dogs with them, and over time only the toughest of these survived this new, harsh and rugged land of ours. With the arrival of the British Settlers in 1820, the Bulldog and another Mastiff-type dog were also introduced, amongst many others. It should be noted that the true Bull Mastiff was only imported to South Africa in 1928, by De Beers, to be guard dogs on the diamond mines. But, truth be told, this is how the Boerboel, as found on countless farms and which later trekked north with the Great Trek, originated.

Acceptable colors: The coat is short and sleek with dense hair coverage. The recognised colours are all shades of yellow (all shades), brown (black is reg. as brown) or brindle. The Boerboel is well pigmented, especially on the lips; palate; the skin and hair around the eyes; footpads; toenails; the anus and the skin and hair around the genitals. Piebald is accepted but scored poorly, there is some acceptance if the pigment is good. Red nose is dq'd Blue nose is considered rare (but I find most judges/breeders don't understand the genetics and it "pops" up from visually obvious characters.

Temperament: The Boerboel is manageable, reliable, obedient and intelligent with strong protective instincts. The Boerboel is self-confident and fearless. They are known to love children and be exceptionally gentle with them. They would often be found guarding children on the farms and on the compounds.

Height: male dog is 66cm – lower than 60cm is unacceptable
Height: bitch is 61cm – lower than 55cm is unacceptable
Dog is to be balanced; but weights can range from 110 - 200 (blech!)

Health Problems: Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia, Wobblers, Vaginal hyperplasia, allergies

Exercise: If hound in type (lighter) need a fair bit. If mastiff in type (heavier), happy with less.

Life Expectancy: 5-13 years depending on bloodlines/circumstances; there is a female noted that was wandering around still at the age of 20

Grooming: Very little/smooth coated

What to look for in a breeder: Look for a breeder that actually DOES something with their dogs, preferably show and performance. There is a preponderance of breeders that breed for pretty as opposed to functional. Make sure your breeder takes/tests dogs off property, they definitely are a stronger breed on their own property. Can be too defensive in drives. Watch out for breeders that breed extremes, e.g. head measurements, extremes in weight or height, extremes in colour -- black is the new $40,000 Boerboel.

Ideal living conditions: Indoors with the family

"Ideal" owner: Active family that wants a dog that will protect and that wants to be with you.

Trainability: Medium, very manipulative, often need a firm hand.

Other traits: Have strange habits of sitting on your feet. Two distinct types; the hound and the mastiff; typically crossed together to maintain a medium-weight build. Too much mastiff is typically seen in too much face wrinkle, much shorter muzzle. Too much hound is typically seen with thin bone, snipey face and overall lighter build. Ideally the individual dog falls in between.

Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:

SABT / SABBA

EBBASA
 
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#25
Komondorok - GENERAL DESCRIPTION

King of the Hungarian livestock guarding dogs, the Komondor, is one of the most unusual breeds seen in the United States today. A big muscular dog covered with dense, white cords. This coat protects the dog against the elements and predators on the Puszta of its homeland, Hungary. The Komondor is a large dog with males standing at least 27 1/2" at the shoulders, while females must be at least 25 1/2" tall. Occasionally one may see a Komondor as large as 31" or even bigger, but these cases are rare. While large, the Komondor is not an overly heavy dog. Males usually weigh more than 80 pounds and females more than 60 pounds. Despite its size, the Komondor is astonishingly fast, agile and light on its feet. The quick movement, large size, unique coat and majestic appearance of the Komondor can be awe inspiring. A fearless dog, the Komondor's main task is to guard flocks of sheep or other livestock against predators such as wolves, coyotes, feral dogs, or human predators. The nature of the Komondor is that of a calm watchful dog who thrives on responsibility. Komondors need something to watch over. Be it livestock, children, or a cat, a Komondor is happiest when taking responsibility for another's well-being. As a pet, the Komondor is quiet around the house, unless it perceives a threat to those entrusted to its care. If challenged, the Komondor becomes a fearless protector knocking down an intruder or breaking windows to protect its "flock". In the field, the Komondor is vigilant and trustworthy, reducing losses and even caring for orphans. It is important to remember that the Komondor is, first and foremost, a stock guard dog. When evaluating whether this is the breed for you and your family, keep this in mind. If you are seriously considering acquiring a Komondor, we strongly urge you to see adult dogs in their home environment before making your final decision. Contact the Corresponding Secretary of the Komondor Club of America for the names of owners in your area. The KCA can also provide you with a list of breeders, members of the KCA, who have pledged to abide by the Code of Ethics of the KCA, and strive to breed only healthy animals who conform to the American Kennel Club standard for the breed.

HISTORY

The Komondor is an ancient breed. While its homeland has been Hungary for many centuries, it is generally thought to be a descendent of the Russian Owtcharka brought to what is now Hungary by the invading Magyars. The word "komondor" can be found in Hungarian documents dating from the 16th century, though reference to large sheepdogs predate that. The Komondor was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1937. During World War II contact between the United States and Hungary was cut off and there was virtually no importing and no breeding done in this country. In Europe the breed was almost wiped out because of the war. Only a few dozen specimens were left afterward, and the breed was slowly re-established in Hungary, but was rare even there. During the entire period between World War II and 1960, only about 1000 Komondors had been registered in Hungary. Contact between the American Kennel Club and the Hungarian Kennel Club was re-established in 1962, and importation of Komondors resumed. The next two decades saw dogs imported from Hungary and elsewhere in Europe, and American breeders produced an average of 50 litters a year in the 1980's.

TEMPERAMENT

Komondor temperament is like that of all livestock guarding dogs: calm and steady when things are normal. In cases of trouble, the dog will leap to defend its charges. It was bred to think for itself and is usually intelligent. It is extremely affectionate with its family and friends and gentle with the children of the family. Although wary of strangers, it will nonetheless accept them when it is clear that no harm is meant. It is very protective of its family, home and possessions. It will instinctively guard them without any training. Once a new member has been introduced into the family or flock, the Komondor will never forget them. A Komondor will routinely greet someone it has not seen for years as though it had just seen them yesterday. Once you are a "member of the flock," you are always a "member of the flock." A Komondor has keen instincts and can sense the intentions of anyone in its presence. Should it decide its flock, territory, family, or master needs protection, it will not hesitate to spring into action, defending it charges fearlessly and with suddenness which take the intruder by surprise. An athletic dog, the Komondor has great speed and power and will leap toward a predator to drive it away or to knock it down. Because of the Komondor's size, power, and speed, its owner must have it under control. Obedience training is a must, preferably starting at an early age (4 - 8 months). Komondors are usually intelligent and take well to training if started early. Komondors become obstinate when bored, so it is imperative that training sessions be upbeat and happy. Praise is a must, as are consistent and humane corrections. Once a Komondor gets away with unfriendly or hostile behavior, it will always think such behavior is appropriate. Therefore, consistent corrections even with a young puppy are necessary to ensure a well-adjusted adult. Socialization is also extremely important. The Komondor should be exposed to new situations, people and other dogs as a puppy. Because it is a natural guard dog, a Komondor that is not properly socialized may react in an excessively aggressive manner when confronted with a new situation or person. Again, puppy training is strongly recommended for all Komondors. GENERAL Given the proper environment and care, a Komondor is a responsible, loving dog. They are devoted and calm without being sluggish. They can be wary of strangers, but may accept people readily and are quite friendly. As in any breed, there is quite a range of personalities, so your needs should be outlined clearly to your breeder. An experienced breeder can try to identify that personality which would be happier as an independent livestock dog, or that which wants more to please and would make a good obedience dog or family pet. Diet for the adult Komondor need not be a complicated matter. As with all livestock guarding dogs, Komondors have been bred for many centuries to make efficient use of their food. Many adult Komondors eat no more that three cups of food per day and are in excellent health and weight. Generally, portions indicated on the dog food bag are far too generous. Be careful not to over-feed or over-supplement your Komondor. Your breeder can provide more information relative to the care and feeding of your dog. Many Komondors are "late bloomers", not fully mature until nearly three years of age. Adolescence can be marked by changes in temperament, eating habits, trainability and general attitude. This should not cause alarm. By the time they are three years old, they are responsible adults. However, to expect an eight month old puppy to behave as an adult is unreasonable. Puppies are as active, playful and troublesome as in any breed. Truly responsible behavior cannot be expected until they reach full maturity.
 
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#26
Komondorok cont.
HEALTH

Komondors do not suffer many heredity problems. Perhaps because the breed has descended from centuries of hardy working stock, Komondors have few genetically linked problems. In particular, there is no evidence of the retinal eye problems found in other breeds, nor is there dwarfism or hereditary blood disorders. As in all large breeds (and some small ones) there is some hip dysplasia, though the incidence is about 10% of all radiographs submitted, according to statistical studies of the OFA. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), an organization affiliated with the university of Missouri, reads hip x-rays and rates them against other x-rays of the same breed at the same age. Actual certification that a dog is free of hip dysplasia cannot take place until the dog is over the age of two years. All breeders in the United States who are affiliated with the Komondor Club of America should be in compliance with the Code of Ethics which requires that their breeding stock be x-rayed and certified free of hip dysplasia by the OFA. However, even two parents certified clear of hip dysplasia can produce dysplastic offspring. Often it will be years before this condition is noticed. One eye disorder which is found in the breed is entropian, which is indicated by the curling inwards of either the upper or lower eyelid. This lid deformity causes the lashes to rub against the cornea causing lacerations and infections of the eye. It can be corrected by surgery, but after such surgery, the dog cannot be shown and any dog with this problem should not be bred since it is genetic in nature. Another genetic eye problem that has recently been documented in the breed is juvenile cataracts. The Canine Eye Registration Foundation, CERF, located at Purdue University, evaluates eye exams and assigns a CERF number if the dog's eyes are free of genetic problems. Before buying a puppy, find out if the puppy's parents have been properly evaluated for hip and eye problems, and what (if any) guarantee the breeder is willing to provide you for your dog. There is some indication of "bloat", (gastric diliation-torsion syndrome), a life threatening condition is genitic, but the incidence of bloat is no greater than with any other large breeds. This condition is marked by acute distress, and emergency measures should be taken immediately. If not treated immediately complications, both neurological and circulatory, can result in death. Please discuss this disease with your vet and your breeder, and learn the symptoms. Surgical correction of the problem is available and has been successful in many cases. External parasites can be a problem due to the heavy coat. As with any long-haired dog, a skin check should be part of your regular grooming routine. Should you find fleas or ticks, aggressive measures are in order. Shampoos and powders work well, but be sure to make sure you reach all parts of dog's skin. With the big coat, it is easy to miss a spot where the fleas can hide. Owners should check anti-flea and tick preparations carefully as Komondors are extremely sensitive to some of these products. Also be sure to spot-test the coat before dipping as some flea dips have been known to discolor the white coat. Flea collars too can discolor the hair beneath them, so look for a white or transparent one. Ear care should be routine also. Since Komondors have ears which hang down preventing air circulation, it is especially necessary to keep them clean and hair-free. Some ear canals are hairier than others, but commercial powders, cleansing fluids, and plucking can greatly reduce the infections. Thick hair grows between the pads of the feet which also requires maintenance. This hair can pick up burrs, or, when wet, becomes a source of irritation and infection. For the health and comfort of the dog, this hair should be cut out with an electric clipper or scissors to keep mats from forming between the foot pads. As in all breeds one should be careful that Komondors have the proper vaccines against rabies, distemper, parvo, etc. Dogs should also be checked periodically for worms and other internal parasites. Like all stock guard dogs Komondors are usually extremely sensitive to anesthetics. These drugs should always be administered to effect... never by weight.

PREDATOR CONTROL

In Hungary, the Komondor is hardly ever seen in cities. Considered to be the chief of the herdsman's dogs, the Komondor is used to protect the herdsman and his animals. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of the Komondor as a livestock guardian among cattle, sheep and goat ranchers in the United States. Federally-funded projects have been established to study the use of livestock guard dogs for predator control and have found the dogs to be successful under certain circumstances. With increasing interest in re-establishing the wolf in the Western United States, more livestock ranchers will no doubt be looking to the Komondor and other guardian dogs to protect their assets. Komondors are well suited for the task of predator control (both two and four legged kind). The white coat allows the dog to mingle unnoticed among the sheep while allowing the shepherd to see him at night. Also the coat acts as a protective barrier from the harsh weather and jaws of an attacking animal. The cords both insulate and cool. They are open to the skin so that they allow air to pass through, yet the density and length of the cords protect he animal underneath. In the U.S., Komondors have been effectively used to fend off coyotes and bobcats. Even in livestock guarding situations, however, Komondors must be trained to know the owners rules. Many a Komondor who works well with the sheep cannot be taken to the vet when the need arises. All dogs must be trained to be handled by the owner and strangers when necessary. The Komondor Club of America has a committee dedicated to the education and assistance of the rancher. For more information about the Predator Control Committee, contact the Secretary.

OBEDIENCE

To the Komondor lover, no other dog possesses the depth of soul or sense of responsibility of this breed, but because of this the Komondor can represent a real challenge to the serious obedience trainer. Komondors are smart and have been bred to think for themselves. Therefore it can be difficult for them to trust completely the directions of a mere human. Easy to train at the start, they can just as easily decide that, once a task is done, it need never be done again. Repetition bores them. It is up to the handler to think of ways to keep training fun and full of surprises. Some breeds thrive of repetition, getting the most satisfaction out of being asked to do something which is familiar and can be accomplished successfully. The Komondor is not one those breeds. Komondors love to learn something new. Often in competition, however, the Komondor can seem somewhat less than enthusiastic at having to do those exercises again. Lagging on heeling seems always to be the biggest point loser. Many Komondors can be seen keeping an eye on the judge... just in case he's really a predator. Judges who follow the dog around the ring make them especially nervous. A Komondor has been known to go High-in-Trial, and a few have Utility degrees. They are capable of great accomplishments, but they may try the ingenuity of the trainer.
 
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#27
SHOWING

Nothing is more impressive than a Komondor in the show ring. A clean, well presented, happy Komondor is a sight to behold. Although Komondors are not often thought of as the ultimate show dog, quite a few have achieved top awards. Komondors are shown moving at a leisurely gait and are set square on their feet. The coat should be clean, and feet and mouths may be trimmed neatly. There is an A.K.C. rule regarding foreign substances in the coat, so no powder or whitening agents should be left in the show coat. No excuse should be made for a Komondor which will not allow the judge to examine it. Even though they are naturally wary of strangers, Komondors are smart enough to be trained to do whatever you ask of them. If a Komondor is unsure of himself, or if the handler is unsure of the dog, the dog should not be shown.

THE COAT

Most people are initially attracted to the Komondor because of his corded coat. When clean and groomed the coat can be quite beautiful, however sometimes the dogs are seen in public dirty, matted and bad smelling. When presented in such condition, the breed's reputation suffers. Caring for the coat takes organization and effort, but it is not an impossible task. The cords form when the woolly undercoat is trapped by the harsher curlier outer-coat. As the coat mats together, the curl of the outer-coat helps determine the natural separation points. Separate the clumps following the pattern of the curls, having the base of the cords approximately the size of a quarter. With time and the process of wetting and drying, the clumps will tighten up forming cords. At first these cords will be short, but as the dog ages the coat grows longer, the cords will acquire the length and graceful swing of the impressive adult coat. Cords begin forming between the ages of eight months and twelve months, and continue throughout the life of the dog. As new coat grows, the cords will clump together at the base. You will need to spend time every week working on the cords to keep them neat. As you might imagine, it is easy for dirt to get into the cords. If that dirt becomes trapped as the cord tightens, the coat will become discolored and dull looking. The best way to keep a Komondor clean is never to allow it to get dirty. If the dog does get into a mud puddle, than a quick rinse with a garden hose will help get the dirt out. Trimming the hair around the mouth can help keep it dry and can lessen the odor, but there should be cords left on the muzzle. Hair which never dries can mildew, so cutting some of it off may lessen the problem. No working Komondor can be kept from getting dirty, and most mature dogs with full coats cannot be kept immaculate save by extreme measures. Even with the most extreme measures, the coat of a mature Komondor is not as white as that of other white dogs which shed out their entire coat once or twice a year. The true pure white color can be seen at the base of the Komondor's cords. A dryer or floor fan is very helpful in caring for the corded coat. Because damp hair picks up dirt easier than dry hair, keeping the coat dry helps keep it clean. Komondors like moving air more than cold air, and a Komondor will often be seen lying on its back upside-down in front of a fan when one is available. Adult Komondors may occasionally lose an entire cord, but they do not shed in the usual sense of the word. Like poodles, which also can be corded, Komondors are a good breed for those who have allergies to dog hair and dander. If you are interested in an outside dog to stay with the livestock, coat care should consist of enough separating to keep the dog comfortable and routine examinations for large weeds, twigs, and burrs. Ears should also be cleaned occasionally and checked for infection and foreign objects.

NOTE If you are seriously considering acquiring a Komondor, we strongly urge you to see adult dogs in their home environment before making your final decision!

4 month old pups


7 months old


10 months old


1 1/2 years old


6 years old - Ch. Gillian's Quintessential Quincy


10 year old Komondor shaved down


Komondorok:
Komondor Club of America
 
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#31
I saw one once shaved down and at first thought that it was the biggest poodle that I'd ever seen. Then I realized what it was. I think that I'd like the temperament, and and REALLY love not having dog hair everywhere!
My friend with her old boy who's shaved and she gives him funky hair cuts which confuses everyone. One time she grooms him like a poodle the next a pwd or lets him grow out. Usually she gets oh look a poodle with a tail when he's in a poodle clip or oh look a golded-doodle when he's grown out. I know I got that when Mac was still fluffy oh a golden-doodle puppy i've never seen one that big and white or I got one just like him at home! What is he? Oh mine's not that. LOL As long as you keep cords no matter the length you wont have the hair it just rolls into the cord, but you do get it in the puppy fluff stage just not as bad cause the coat is trying to form cords and they do shed when the are shaved short.

 
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#32
Siberian Husky

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: a medium-size, dense-coat sled dog breed that originated in eastern Siberia.

Acceptable colors: The most common colors are black and white, red and white, gray and white, and solid white. Solid Black, Sable, and Wolf Grey are often seen in working lines. Piebald spotting is allowed by the standard. Merle is NOT an acceptable coloring regardless of certain breeders now claiming it is-they are likely ACD/Aussie mixes.
Colors of the Siberian Husky

Temperament: Friendly, alert, playful, active.

Height:20-23 1/2 inches.

Weight: 35-60 pounds

Health Problems: PRA, Cataracts, Corneal Distrophy, Hypothyroidism. Less commonly Hip Displasia.

Exercise: A balance of physical exercise and mental stimulation are needed. Expect to give 1-2 hours of solid physical exercise a day, obedience training in addition helps to tire their mind. A bored husky can easily chew through a wall or disembowel your couch, always exercise to avoid mass distruction! These are dogs who were breed and born to run and run they will, all exercise should be in an enclosed area or on a leash. Their independent nature, drive to run, and prey drive combined make them poor candiates to be offleash without extensive training(even then for some the lure of prey or drive to run is just too much). Look into recreational sledding, bikejoring, or carting for easy and fun ways to exercise your sibe.

Life Expectancy: 15 years

Grooming:Double coat, medium in length, sometimes seen with a "wooly" coat which although is not standard. Coat keeps relatively well when brushed weekly though daily brushing is reccomended to reduce the amount of hair during coat blows. These dogs blow their coats twice a year. Expect EVERYTHING to be plastered in hair, you will eat, sleep, and breath hair for a month during the coat blowing process.

What to look for in a breeder: Shows/Works their dogs, does OFA hips/ CERF eyes, Genetic testing through Optigen for PRA is a plus.

Ideal living conditions: While their coats can withstand bad winter weather, Sibes are truly pack animals and are happiest with their humans. Crate training is suggested due to their destructive tendancies when bored.

"Ideal" owner: Active outdoorsy family. Winter sports lovers.

Trainability: Siberians are brilliant dogs though with their independent nature they can become bored of training rather quick. We find that keeping training sessions short and using jackpot rewards of whatever motivates the individual dog we can train them quite easily. These dog however are not the best pick if you want to be extremely competitive in sport competitions.

Other traits: Good with children, strangers and other dogs. Rarely same sex aggressive even among unaltered dogs if properly socialized however, they do have a very rough and tumble play style which may not match well with some dogs. Very high prey drive, so they should not be trusted with small animals (sometimes will do well with even small dogs). Poor guard dogs because of their love for people, they will rarely bark to alert. Escape artist extrodinaire, if there is a way out they will find it, if not they will make one. Without sufficent exercise these dogs can wreck havoc on your home, we've seen walls chewed through, couches eaten, etc. Behavioral problems common to the breed are seperation anxiety, resource guarding, boredom destruction, and pulling on leash.


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)
Siberian Husky Club of America, Inc.
The Siberian Husky Forum
Welcome to the Siberian Husky Health Foundation Website
ISHC: International Siberian Husky Club
Colors of the Siberian Husky - Siberian Husky Breed Information
Siberian Husky Behavior Information
 
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#33
Chow-chow

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: In general the chow is a proud dog that when in gait holds its head and tail high. The body should be "square" in overall build with the length of body matching the dog's height. A chow is a medium sized dog and is typically very strong. They can be either rough or smooth with the rough coat being thick and fluffed out and the smooth coat being short and rough. Their muzzle should be short or slightly pushed back, but should not be pushed in to the point that it becomes "pug-like". Their tail curls over their back in a spitz-type manner. The ears should be small and erect.

acceptable colors: Blue, cinnamon, cream, black, red. red and cinnamon often display black or otherwise darker masks that will get lighter as the dog ages

Temperament:
This breed is more independent than most other breeds. It requires strict socializing early on in it's life to prevent any aggression problems. The breed itself is more cat-like in it's independence and does not cary a strong drive to please. They are very devoted and loving to their families but are often standoffish with strangers. This is not to be confused with aggression. This dog is very intelligent though they hold a stubbornness that will make them seem otherwise. They have a very laid back attitude. Displays of aggression or timidity are unacceptable.

Height: 17-20 in (43-51 cm), but may vary.

Weight: 40-75 pounds

Health Problems: This breed is susceptible to death under anesthesia. At all times a vet should be aware of this breed's susceptibility to the drug. A very minimal dose should be used for any surgeries or exams that require sedation. Dogs have been known to pass away while under.

Their rear legs are very straight and this often results in ruptured or torn Cruciate Ligaments. This is a painful situation that often requires surgical care.

Chows are prone to "hot spots" of dermatitis that can be highly irritating. This appears as patches of skin that are hotter than the surrounding area that may appear red, scabby, scaled, or bumpy.

Ectropion - the inward rolling of the eyelashes - sometimes occurs in this breed. This is painful and requires medical attention.

Enlongated soft palettes occur in poorly bred dogs. This needs to be diagnosed by a veterinarian. This condition can cause issues with the dog's respiratory system including difficulty breathing. It is possible to cure by surgery.

Hypothyroidism, Seborrhea, Heat Stroke, Elbow Dysplacia, Bloat and Inguinal Hernia are also all health concerns.

Exercise: This is a laid-back breed that while not superbly energetic will still benefit from a daily walking schedule. Ideally they should be walked at least once a day for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Life Expectancy:
These dogs have been known to live as long as 17 years.

Grooming:
This dog should be brushed every other day to prevent matts and bathed monthly. Bathing can happen more often if you so prefer so long as a gentle shampoo is used.

What to look for in a breeder:
Breeders should be aware of all health conditions in the dogs, should have completed all appropriate health tests, should only breed their females a maximum of 3 times, should breed dogs that will produce offspring that will excel as according to the standard (instead of dogs they think would make pretty babies), and should take care of their dogs. All dogs should be of prime health. Good breeders should allow you to tour their breeding kennel, including the runs and anywhere else they keep the dogs. Breeders should not be breeding for faults and should be properly sterilizing any dog that does not fit into the standard. (really this is just the same as finding any other breeder). Above most other things, Breeders should be aware of the Anesthesia danger in the breed.

Ideal living conditions:
The ideal living conditions for this breed is a small to medium-sized yard for natural exercising. They can live in an apartment life fine but dogs in an apartment environment are often less active.

"Ideal" owner:
The ideal owner should be firm and assertive and always consistent. Because of their independence, stubbornness, and intelligence, a chow-chow will find your boundaries and limits and test them. This intelligent breed requires an equally intelligent owner that is going to spend time with their dog encouraging the correct behaviors.

Trainability:
Chow-chows are a stubborn breed that do not often have a strong desire to please. However, with consistency and finding a good motivator (favorite treat, or toy) they are moderately easy to train. They may, however, take longer to learn commands than many other breeds.

Other traits: Chow-chows should never be left alone with small animals. These dogs were meant to be pulling dogs and are often happy when put to work. A carrying pack or a small cart would be ideal for these dogs to "help" around the house. If raised and socialized well they will cope well with children, kids, other dogs, pets, and strangers. However, lack of socialization in these fields is going to create hard to change issues. These breeds prefer cold to heat, unless shaven.






 

Whisper

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#35
Originally Posted by Lizmo and Tucker&Me
Border Collie

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: The Border Collie originated from the Scotland/England border. This is where the name the "Border" Collie came from. Border Collies are among the world's smartest dog breeds. They are highly trainable with lightning fast responses and alertness to anything its owner is doing. The Border Collie is a working dog. They are used by many farms and ranchers to move any type of stock. Today, Border Collies are used in many dog sports, but it's original purpose is to be a stock dog. The Border Collie is a breed that has a large split within the show and working bred dogs.

Acceptable colors: Any.

Temperament: The Border Collie is intense to most average owners. They are generally very willing to please there owner for as little as a petting from them.

Height: 18-22in. But anything is accepted.

Weight: 20-50lbs. Again, anything is accepted.

Health Problems: Epilepsy, Hip Dysplasia, PRA, CEA (Collie Eye Anomaly), and deafness.

Exercise: They require daily exercise, but working bred Border Collies should have a good off switch. More so then physical exercise, the border collie requires mental stimulation. They thrive on having a job and are happiest when they have something to do, be it exercising on a walk or putting away toys in their toy box at home. Being worked physically is just the beginning. To enrich the lives of these dogs it is essential to provide them with mental challenges through training and dog sports like herding, agility, flyball, etc. When exercising a Border Collie, most particularly in hot weather, keep an eye out for signs of heat exhaustion. They are very focused and intense on whatever task they are doing, so they may not stop when they reach their physical limit.

Life Expectancy: They are expected to live fairly long. Usually about 12-16 years.

Grooming: They require little daily grooming. Most Border Collies have a nice wash 'n wear type coat.

What to look for in a breeder: The best type of breeder to look for when wanting a Border Collie is one that works his/her dogs in herding. Even though bred for stock work, these dogs come with great off switches and excel in many other dog sports. It is also crucial to make sure all parents are tested for genetic diseases and that epilepsy doesn't exist in the family tree.
Ideal living conditions: Any, as long as it has the right, dedicated owner.

"Ideal" owner: Someone who wants a shadow, intelligence, and a dog that gives 110% in everything, and is also prepared to give back 110% to this dog.
Trainability: Very, very high.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activities/sports the breed does well in): They can either be a child's best friend or worst enemy. If in the right hands, they love children. They do well meeting other dogs and should be taught to do well. It is important to also take into consideration that the breed can be aloof, no matter how well socialized. If someone wants a dog that will be around lots of children, it is important to find the right breeder that is aware of this and can help in choosing the most suitable, outgoing puppy. These dogs do not always get along well with other dogs. Many are 'offended' by dogs that are rambunctious or crowd them, so prepare to socialize a lot and be aware of your dog's threshold. Border Collies seem to recognize other dogs of their breed, and although they can communicate well with any type of dog, for some dogs, the intensity and staring of a BC can seem threatening.

Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..): USBCHA, ABCA, BC Boards, Little Hats.
Ok, I made some additions and corrected some typos.
Also, I made the distinction between PRA and CEA because although they're similar, they are different diseases.

ETA: I think it's important to at least mention show border collies, because as a dog breed info source, it should appear unbiased.
 

Whisper

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#38
It's one of those "make a post and put a link to your site between random words" spammers.
Now, if I could figure out WTF that post means, it might be interesting. :p
 

Lizmo

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#40
ETA: I think it's important to at least mention show border collies, because as a dog breed info source, it should appear unbiased.
Yes, but IMO it should be done seperately. I did the first one from a working view point.
 
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