A dog breed that will follow me around off leash in a city

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by cfas, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. cfas

    cfas New Member

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    I went to Paris and almost all the dogs I saw there were off leash, and just trotted alongside or behind their owners. Occasionally they'd stop to sniff something but the owner would just keep walking, and never tell them to come, and they'd just catch up a few seconds later.

    I want a dog that I have a deep connection with. I want to get each other. I want a dog that is very handler focused and biddable, not overly friendly to dogs or people but not aggressive. Preferably between 20 and 60 pounds, no poodle hair or wire coat. I'm not very interested in formal dog sports, but I am a runner and a walker. I am a big mover! Yesterday I walked 12 miles going from meeting to meeting to shops etc. I would like a dog to join me on these and be able to sit outside a store and wait calmly. (with training of course.) The dog would ideally love to be trained - know a ton of fun tricks, especially useful ones like picking things up. Would also need to be able to live happily in a city with a ton of stimulus - kids, dogs, trucks, trains, sirens, etc. I want a dog that will also enjoy swimming, frisbee, and catching ball, and can get along with a cat.

    I have found that herding breeds are my favorites in general followed by sporting. What breeds come to mind?
     
  2. Sekah

    Sekah The Monster.

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    The behaviour you describe is not a breed characteristic for any dog, really. Herders, as you suspect, are some of the most biddable. But the training and temperament of the individual will trump breed choice, I think.

    For what it's worth, I can do that with my Aussie. Though, even then, I'm selective about when I do it and I'm aware of the risks.
     
  3. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I think you've got the right start considering herding and sporting groups, but what you're looking for isn't going to be a breed characteristic. I've known individual dogs of a huge range of breeds which were able to accomplish that, but dozens of others in those breeds that would never manage.

    It's going to largely, largely depend on your skills as a dog trainer, and take probably at least two years of training (with ongoing maintance training) to get a dog to that level. You're also going to have to choose the right breed, but more importantly, lines and breeders.

    You don't want a dog with high prey drive, which is going to rule at most terriers, breeds like cur dogs, and sighthounds. You're going to want a biddable dog, ruling out many hounds and more "primitive" breeds. A herding dog could work, but many are motion reactive and drivey, so you'd need to pick a breeder carefully.

    Poodle would be one of the first breeds that come to mind, but you say no poodle hair. A golden or lab from more handler-focused show lines might work, but most I've met, especially in younger years, are too A.D.D. for that. And if they're too people-friendly could run off to make friends (or find food). A spaniel could be a good choice, and I've known a few viszlas that have done well off leash. Toller comes to mind but I have no hands on experience. English Shepherd might be a good place to start with herders, but you'd need to ask some people with more breed knowledge. I've known Bernese mountain dogs to do well off leash in crowded areas, but they can be a bit fearful/protective ( at least in my area) and are bigger than your range.
     

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