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  #11  
Old 05-27-2009, 07:14 PM
thats_how_I_roll thats_how_I_roll is offline
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hey,I have a little update my mom has a slight change in heart she would perfer a smaller dog that you can carry.And since this dog is going to be staying at my Moms it will not have to be left alone.
So My mom and I have looked at couple breeds Boston terriers,french bulldogs,shih tzu or a prembroke corgi How do you think these dog would fit my lifestyle from personal expierence?
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  #12  
Old 05-27-2009, 07:24 PM
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Corgis are probably out of your list. They're high energy, shed like mad and since they're snarky little herders, will probably nip at your horse instead of running next to it.

None of those dogs are going to make good horse joggers, they're just too small and most have the "smooshy face" which inhibits breathing to a degree.

Shih tzu's need regular grooming, either daily brushing to keep the mats and tangles out (and they tangle easily) or regular clipping to keep them in a shorter coat. They're laid back and cuddly, not very active as far as long walks/running goes (a short jaunt around the block at a quick pace and some tag in the house is usually good) but they're somewhat hard to potty-train.

Bostons are cute but are terriers, meaning they have minds of their own and tend to require quite a bit of exercise for their size. They can get snarky with other dogs and are prone to eye issues (though going to a good breeder who screens both parents for this issue before breeding will lessen your pup's chances of developing them). Easy coat care, just brushing a few times a week with a bristle brush and a bath when necessary.

"Frenchies" are quite clowning, can be prone to breathing issues because of their face shape and joint problems because of their body structure. They are quite clownish in personality and pretty snuggly little guys. Prone to heat exhaustion because of muzzle shape, so exercise outdoors needs to be gauged against the temperature.
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  #13  
Old 05-27-2009, 07:42 PM
thats_how_I_roll thats_how_I_roll is offline
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not to debate but bostons I believe are not terriers the name is a miscopception.
I really would like a dog that could follow me on my horse or I could tuck him in my shirt(jk or an I) this is going to sound wierd but is thier any medium-small dog that could be my farm buddy?
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  #14  
Old 05-27-2009, 08:41 PM
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I remember watching an animal planet special once about a papillon that worked with horses, and spent his days on horseback with his master. He just kind of hopped up on the horses' bum and rode there. I don't know if that is typical of the breed, but you are much more likely to get a halfway athletic dog that can keep up with you in that breed. There are several pap owners on the board who can give more informed opinions on the breed.

If you're still open to a larger breed, pointers, any of the gun dogs really would be excellent choices. Labs, weims, dals, spaniels, etc. If you stick with a close working breed, and make sure to socialize heavily with the horses there shouldn't be any problems (breed related anyway)

Of the larger dogs, I would think the following would work well:

Wirehaired pointing griffon (we have one, he is AWESOME with non poultry livestock and would be perfect for what you are asking of a dog) In Germany they commonly work with riders on horseback, and they are a close working breed which means that while they are hunting/pointing/tracking they work close to their handler and don't wander a half mile away like some other breeds *coughgermanwirehairedpointercough*

Gordon setter. Maybe look into them and see if they do anything for you.

Maybe a vizsla or weimaraner, though they are both pretty active like the dalmations.

Brittany Spaniel?

For smaller breeds, there are smaller spaniels though most of them need to be brushed a couple times a week, or be clipped. I don't know if that is something you are willing to do. My aunt had her american cocker spaniel with her horses all the time, they got along great and he loved trotting alongside the horses on trail rides.

Keeshond? Will require grooming though. No clipping, but brushing.
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  #15  
Old 05-27-2009, 08:46 PM
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I was thinking some type of Spaniel but I'll have to look into it more.
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  #16  
Old 05-27-2009, 08:55 PM
thats_how_I_roll thats_how_I_roll is offline
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ok is there a breed that could at least be a farm buddy nothing high stung calm smart.
I really like American Eskimos how are they?
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  #17  
Old 05-27-2009, 09:13 PM
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If I put Charlie (our griffon) in a box and shipped him overnight to you right now, he'd be everything you asked for in the first post. As long as you didn't expect him to ignore chickens.

A lot of breeds who fit all your other criteria tend to come "high strung" because there are a lot of folks out there breeding Fifi and Fido in the backyard to make some $$$, and not paying attention to temperament. It's pretty likely you could approach a breed specific rescue once you pick the type of dog you want, and find an adult individual who has the perfect temperament and energy requirements for you.

Even among the herding breeds. Not every aussie, corgie, etc. is going to be a stellar herding dog. Even in working bred litters, it's not unusual for a pup or two to lack the drive to do the job they were bred for. When it comes down to it, they are all individuals. You can look at breed as a guide to what you will probably get, and for health (like the squishy bulldog faces) there are physical traits you want to avoid completely. Basset hounds would also be a terrible choice for a dog that you want to keep up with horses every day, just because most won't have the physical stamina to do it.

As an example, one of my friends breeds collies and she has a smooth female that has no interest in herding anything. She is a fabulous tracking dog, she really does great with horses as she does not try to herd them but that isn't average for the breed. Just because it isn't average doesn't mean it doesn't exist. The benefit to a rescue dog is that most of them are fostered in volunteers homes and so they have a good idea of the energy levels, prey drive, etc. of the dog. They may even have access to horses to test the dogs with. or let you introduce them to yours before adopting. Definitely contact some rescues and tell them what you are looking for, you might just find your perfect dog that way.

Odd as it sounds, I have a cousin with three chihuahuas that are her farm dogs. Moto, her main dude, rides horseback with her tucked into her coat. He's a way cool dog.
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  #18  
Old 05-27-2009, 09:49 PM
thats_how_I_roll thats_how_I_roll is offline
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well I have heard a lot of good expierences about papillions I am going to look into them as french bulldogs and boston terrier are not good in hot weather right?
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  #19  
Old 05-28-2009, 12:41 AM
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My 8 pound mutt is the GREATEST riding dog. Just put her in your saddle bag and she's good to go.

Small dogs may not be able to come out riding with you but they make lovely little hang out around the barn types.
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  #20  
Old 05-28-2009, 08:10 AM
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Actually bostons have a mix of terrier and bulldog personalities (since both were used in their creation). It kind of depends on the individual dog and owner on what personality is more prominent. I know some very busy bostons and I know some bostons who can lay around all day (though most are pretty busy). If you have a preference then I'd go with an adult rescue because you'll have a better idea of what their temperment is like. Bostons in general don't do terribly well in the heat. I usually try not to walk mine during the hottest part of the day. They also have a tendency to snore and be a bit gassy. Because of their short faces they also tend to snort and snuffle which some people may find annoying. They're usually pretty ball crazy and mine absolutely loves squeaky toys. They really are little characters who love to play. If you have any specific questions let me know and I'll answer them the best I can.
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