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  #11  
Old 05-07-2009, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
I was just wondering as it seems that some people don't like to have excited dogs. I was just wondering what you guys thought on the concept.
Then they shouldn't get excitable breeds.
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  #12  
Old 05-07-2009, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Dekka View Post
Then they shouldn't get excitable breeds.
There are always risks with thinking all dogs of a certain breed will act within their stereotype.
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  #13  
Old 05-07-2009, 08:51 AM
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While that is true.. if you don't want an outgoing dog then rescue an adult. Shutting down a dog just so a person doesn't have to deal with the dog's true personality is down right cruel.
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:24 AM
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You can train a dog to not go crazy with new people. There's nothing wrong with giving them rules. New people come to the house, he has to sit to greet them. People reach down for petting, no jumping.

That's not diminishing the excitement, that's just giving it manners. Lucy LOVES people, and when we got her she would jump all over them. Now she just shakes her little butt like crazy and wiggles around in front of them. Still excited, but manageable.

Same thing with squirrels. I am working to teach her that on a leash, we don't chase squirrels. Do I teach her that they're boring? No. I'm trying to teach her that I'm MORE fun than squirrels, so she'd rather pay attention to me. If we're at the park and a stupid squirrel decides to sit on the fence, she is more than welcome to chase it then.

Would I ever "train" her to stop caring when people came or a squirrel sat on our patio? No...she loves it, and I wouldn't want to take that away from her. If that's what you're talking about, then I agree with Dekka--that's cruel.
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  #15  
Old 05-07-2009, 09:34 AM
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I think training or shutting a dog down to always exibit calmness (calm submissive. LOL Someone I think of who thinks dogs should be squelched and calm at all times) is cruel because it's squelching the way dogs generally are...juvenile and playful. Training them to channel those antics in a way that works for us is fine and necessary. There's no reason a dog can't have manners but still have outlets for his dogginess. I like to see a dog's personality and exuberance in performing or displaying his manners shine right through.
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  #16  
Old 05-07-2009, 09:37 AM
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My dogs have rules. But they can be as excited as they want as long as there is minimal barking and jumping on people. I love my dogs to be able to express themselves.

I asked if it was mannerly.. or not allowed to be excitable. The OP is not talking a well mannered dog, but a dog who is not allowed to be excited by things....
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  #17  
Old 05-07-2009, 09:54 AM
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Anytime a dog or human for that matter is not "allowed" to express in any way their own personality, that causes them to be neurotic. That doesn't mean that they should be allowed to do anything they want at any time in any context. They can be taught to "perform" without squashing their exuberance. My Doberman, for example was very high energy, goofy and just full of beans sometimes. But I could ask him to do something in the midst of his craziness or when he was in full play mode...like sit, down, heel and he'd fling himself around me into a heel or plop his rear down into a sit with a huge amount of gusto....speed and force. He'd look up at me like he just invented the cure for cancer. He did everthing obediently but it was as if everything he did was a terrific accomplishment. He was soooooo proud of himself and so willing.

So when I need a dog to get some self control, as long as he's been trained certain skills thoroughly and with fun, I can distract him from his silliness or excitability by engaging him in a few "jobs."

So, no....I don't think a dog is happy if they can't be themselves. And nobody is happy with an untrained dog that is out of control. It's how the control is gotten that makes or breaks it I think.

And there are certain breed traits that are common in particular breeds. If someone doesn't like a high energy, exciteable type, they should watch out for what they choose. Also, people tend to reinforce behaviors they don't want by paying attention to dogs when they're doing the "no no." Instead, they should build on the behaviors they do want and be sure to give suitable outlets for a dog's nature.
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  #18  
Old 05-07-2009, 10:04 AM
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I am teaching my dog to not get excited indoors at times. Late at night when I come home everyone is sleeping we have a quiet freindly greeting. He can bark when someone comes to the door but then must stop after a few minutes, though that is not always possible when the pizza guy comes. It seems to depend upon who it is. Reward the behaviors that you want and ignore or discourage the ones you don't.
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  #19  
Old 05-07-2009, 10:56 AM
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Mine only go bugsh1t when LOgan or Zoom or Higg's Mommy comes and that is because it means DOG FUN! THe rest, a go to your room is sufficient and they will stay quiet. THey take their cue from me. THere is nothing wrong with that. GOd almighty couldn't get them to settle down when Logan comes. They act is if they are drunk on his presense. ANd that is ok too.

I will not let my dogs jump on people or be distracting when someone is at the door or new people are coming in. IF i have a visitor i put the dogs up unless they are here to see the dogs. THe dogs know that too and expect it.
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  #20  
Old 05-07-2009, 11:09 AM
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I'm hoping I didn't do something wrong, and I strongly believe I did not, but Pit is very much like you described.

I didn't train him to be calm all the time, but he turned out that way for some reason. He doesn't get excited when people come over, he prefers not to go meet new dogs (although his breed is aloof, so that's fine) but he also doesn't get excited when I come home from a long day of being away. He doesn't get excited to go for walks, to go for car rides, to see people he hasn't seen in a long time.. he's just very calm.

That being said, he was that way right from the start as an 8 week old puppy. This puppy had NO desire to be a puppy, no matter how much I tried to encourage it.

He has moments of life, like when we play fetch in the river, or the first while of being let off leash with Zero, so he's not a zombie or anything. But I think if I had actually trained him to be calm, he could probably be one of those dogs you described that is always calm.

I don't doubt he's a happy dog. I don't know how happy he'd be if he never got to show excitement.
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