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  #21  
Old 04-14-2009, 05:13 PM
Val_theAussie Val_theAussie is offline
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Originally Posted by corgipower View Post
Yea, there's a lot of bad advice on that site.
I guess, just like going to the doctor, whatever doctor cures you, or whatever helps your puppy become a good pet is the best advice/medical treatment, eh?????

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  #22  
Old 04-14-2009, 05:14 PM
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Dekka ... I do agree with you and should state that personally didn't do it or encouraged because of 3 kids who never knew when to stop !
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  #23  
Old 04-14-2009, 05:26 PM
Val_theAussie Val_theAussie is offline
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I feel badly.....I've always been very good with dogs and haven't had this problem, even as a professional pet-sitter, a job that wasn't even like a "job" and I've always been around dogs and been comfortable with them and they with me.

My last Aussie girl came from the midwest and may have been the product of a "puppy farm", we bought her at a petshop at 4 months and I didn't have any trouble of this kind with her, either.

Here, now I got dog from a very conscientious breeder and it looks like you can never tell what you are going to get, puppy wise, until you get home!
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  #24  
Old 04-14-2009, 06:45 PM
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Dekka Dekka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Val_theAussie View Post
I guess, just like going to the doctor, whatever doctor cures you, or whatever helps your puppy become a good pet is the best advice/medical treatment, eh?????

Um no.. because what if what cures you now kills you a few months down the road?

Bad advice is bad advice. Dominance plays NO PART in this. With holding play and a great tool from your dogs will NOT help stop biting. This has been proven so many times its not funny. The old myths have been shown to be just those myths.

If your doctor told you to take arsenic and cocaine would you? It used to be all the rage!
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  #25  
Old 04-14-2009, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Val_theAussie View Post
I feel badly.....I've always been very good with dogs and haven't had this problem, even as a professional pet-sitter, a job that wasn't even like a "job" and I've always been around dogs and been comfortable with them and they with me.

My last Aussie girl came from the midwest and may have been the product of a "puppy farm", we bought her at a petshop at 4 months and I didn't have any trouble of this kind with her, either.

Here, now I got dog from a very conscientious breeder and it looks like you can never tell what you are going to get, puppy wise, until you get home!
Well part of the issue could be is that getting a pet store aussie probably got you a dumbed down badly bred version of the breed. Now you have a good example of the breed and they are sharper and have more drive. Its that way with many breeds. JRTs (my breed) often are easier to live with if you get a badly bred one. But that is NOT what the breed is supposed to be.
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  #26  
Old 04-14-2009, 06:58 PM
Val_theAussie Val_theAussie is offline
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Nah, it's most likely that male dogs and female dogs are as different as night and day. Female dogs are a lot easier to care for, and have fewer issues, IMO.
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  #27  
Old 04-14-2009, 07:00 PM
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Actually..... it's most likely that Dekka is right, and you had a poorly bred dog. Never buy from a pet store.
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  #28  
Old 04-14-2009, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Val_theAussie View Post
Nah, it's most likely that male dogs and female dogs are as different as night and day. Female dogs are a lot easier to care for, and have fewer issues, IMO.
LOL I wish that were true. Most often its the opposite.. just ask some members here. There is a reason the term 'bitch' means what it does in the vernacular.....
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  #29  
Old 04-14-2009, 07:14 PM
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Aussies are VERY mouthy little sh*ts at times, especially when they're puppies. They are herders and tend towards being grippy with the stock instead of just staring them down like a Border Collie, so they are quite inclined to use their mouths for more than just barking. One of the first things I had to teach Sawyer when I got him was "watch the teeth!" and he was 18 months old at the time.

Your girl, while lovely I'm sure, doesn't sound like she had much of the true Aussie drives. They tend to be heavily milled here in the Midwest and usually end up as sweet but brainless Goldens in a multi-colored coat. Nothing against Goldens, but they aren't Aussies.

I tend to prefer males over females BECAUSE the males are generally more laid back, LOL! Bitches are bitches for a reason!
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  #30  
Old 04-14-2009, 07:45 PM
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AllieMackie AllieMackie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoom View Post
Aussies are VERY mouthy little sh*ts at times, especially when they're puppies. They are herders and tend towards being grippy with the stock instead of just staring them down like a Border Collie, so they are quite inclined to use their mouths for more than just barking. One of the first things I had to teach Sawyer when I got him was "watch the teeth!" and he was 18 months old at the time.
Even Border Collies can often be grippy. Finn's dad was very grippy as a pup (not his mom, though) and I'm finding that Finn forgets his bite inhibition sometimes when he's "in the zone" (read: unconciously thinking that he's working, often when we play outside). He understands bite inhibition and is soft with his mouth 90% of the time, but sometimes when that **** herding instinct goes too far, he loses it a bit.

So, I second what Zoom says about herding dogs. Extra consistency and firmness is needed with them regarding bite inhibition, but it of course can still be taught. At 4 months, I'd say Val is more testing limits and such, and since it was a one-time thing, I doubt it was in his mind to harm you. Just stay on top of the situation.
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