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  #11  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:10 PM
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Romy Romy is offline
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The TDI test at our training center was so much easier than the CGC test our trainer gives. For our trainer's version of the CGC test, we had to put our dog in a down/stay, drop the leash and leave the room for five minutes, and Strider had to do this with a female in heat in the room (he passed ).

They bring in an outside tester to do the TDI. You are not allowed to do any corrections during the test, so be careful.

In the example my trainer gave, one lady failed because when she told her dog to sit it looked like she tugged on the leash to get the dog to do it. It's all hands off working during the test pretty much, though I think you can pet them. We did a lot of off leash heeling and when he did wear a leash draped it over my shoulders so my hands were not on it. She had all the students practice walking like that, getting the dog to respond solely to your voice and hand signals. There is no way the tester could mistake an accidental leash tug for a correction during the test then.

The tester that would come in was a lot more lax in other ways than I expected. One lady had to tell her dog to sit 20 times before it finally did, and they passed. Our trainer is super strict! She wouldn't even let something like that pass basic obedience. The most important things are probably just socializing the heck out of them with wierd things, loud sudden noises, meeting people and being calm around other dogs.

If banging pots together scares your dog, bang them when you feed him. If vaccum cleaners scare him, feed him delicious treats off the vaccum until he'll take them while it's on. Get some old crutches and crutch walk down the street with your dog on leash next to you, get an old walker and use that for a while. Let it scrape and bump everything. Try to get him around some wheelchairs. Every little thing you can do will help your chances of passing and help him be prepared to serve people.

Good luck! I plan on getting every single dog I ever own certified through TDI, because I want any dog I live with to have a high enough level of training and a good enough temperament to be TDI material. Also, I have heard, but am not sure if this is 100% true, that some insurance companies will consider insuring owners with "dangerous" breeds if the individual dogs owned have their CGCs or are therapy dog certified.
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  #12  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:16 PM
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from the site:

http://www.tdi-dog.org/tditesting.html
Quote:
Testing Requirements


AKC CGC TEST® / PLUS ADDED TDI REQUIREMENTS
* TDI Requirements are displayed in italics
Test 1: Accepting a Friendly Stranger
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to approach it and speak to the handler in a natural, everyday situation. The Evaluator and handler shake hands and exchange pleasantries. The dog must show no sign of resentment or shyness, and must not break position or try to go to the Evaluator.

The dog must be tested around medical equipment (such as a wheelchair, crutches, cane, walker, or other devices which would ordinarily be found in a facility) to judge the dog’s reactions to common health care equipment. At the discretion of the Evaluator, this part of the test may be included in any of the following tests: 2,3,5 or 9

Test 2: Sitting Politely for Petting
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to touch it while it is out with its handler. The dog should sit at the handler’s side as the Evaluator approaches and begins to pet the dog on the head and body only. The dog may stand in place to accept petting. The dog must not show shyness or resentment.

Test 3: Appearance and Grooming
This practical test demonstrates that the dog will welcome being groomed and examined and will permit a stranger, such as a veterinarian, groomer or friend of the owner, to do so. It also demonstrates the owner’s care, concern and sense of responsibility. The Evaluator inspects the dog, then combs or brushes the dog, and lightly examines the ears and each front foot.

Test 4: Out For a Walk
(Walking on a Loose Leash)
This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog can be on either side of the handler, whichever the handler prefers. There must be a left turn, a right turn and an about turn, with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops.

Test 5: Walking Through a Crowd
This test demonstrates that the dog can move about politely in pedestrian traffic and is under control in public places. The dog and handler walk around and pass close to several people (at least three). The dog may show some interest in the strangers, without appearing overexuberant, shy or resentful. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise the dog throughout the test. The dog should not be straining at the leash.

Test 6: Sit and Down on Command/Staying in Place
This test demonstrates that the dog has training, will respond to the handler’s command to sit and down, and will remain in the place commanded by the handler (sit or down position, whichever the handler prefers). The handler may take a reasonable amount of time and use more than one command to make the dog sit and then down. When instructed by the Evaluator, the handler tells the dog to stay and walks forward the length of a 20-foot line. The dog must remain in place, but may change positions.

Test 7: Coming when Called
This test demonstrates that the dog will come when called by the handler. The handler will walk 10 feet from the dog, turn to face the dog, and call the dog. The handler may use encouragement to get the dog to come. Handlers may choose to tell the dog to “stay” or “wait,” or they may simply walk away, giving no instructions to the dog as the Evaluator provides mild distraction (e.g., petting).

Test 8: Reaction to Another Dog
This test demonstrates that the dog can behave politely around other dogs. Two handlers and their dogs approach each other from a distance of about 10 yards, stop, shake hands and exchange pleasantries, and continue on for about 5 yards. The dogs should show no more than a casual interest in each other.

Test 9: Reactions to Distractions
This test demonstrates that the dog is confident at all times when faced with common distracting situations, such as the dropping of a large book or a jogger running in front of the dog. The dog may express a natural interest and curiosity and/or appear slightly startled, but should not panic, try to run away, show aggressiveness or bark.

Leave-It: The handler with the dog on a loose leash walks past food on the ground (placed within a distance of three feet) and, upon command, the dog should ignore the food. (Please note: TDI does not permit the use of food/treats during actual therapy dog visits.)

Acclimation to Infirmities: This test demonstrates the dog’s confidence when exposed to people walking with an uneven gait, shuffling, breathing heavily, coughing, wheezing or other distractions which may be encountered in a facility.

Test 10: Supervised Separation
This test demonstrates that a dog can be left with a trusted person, if necessary, and will maintain its training and good manners. Evaluators are encouraged to say something like, “Would you like me to watch your dog?” and then take hold of the dog’s leash. The owner will go out of sight for three minutes. The dog does not have to stay in position but should not continually bark, whine, or pace unnecessarily, or show anything stronger than mild agitation or nervousness.

Test 11: Say Hello
The TDI Certified Evaluator will test the willingness of each dog to visit a person and that the dog can be made readily accessible for petting (i.e., small dogs can be placed on a person’s lap or can be held, medium and larger dogs can sit on a chair or stand close to the patient to be easily reached.)

The dog must be able to work well around all types of populations, including children. The dog's behavior around children must be evaluated during testing. It is important that during the testing the potential therapy dog and the children are not in direct contact. This means the dog can only be observed for a reaction toward playing, running or in general children present at the testing site. Any negative reaction by the dog will result in automatic failure. Negative reaction means a dog showing signs of aggression.

Additional Rules for TDI Testing
1. Dogs must be tested on a plain buckle collar or harness. Training collars, training harnesses, halties, or any other corrective devices are not permitted during testing or visiting as a TDI registered Therapy Dog.
2. Greyhounds are not required to sit for tdi testing.

Note: Potential applicants are not required to take any therapy dog classes, which are not sanctioned by TDI.
She definatly wouldn't pass right now:
Test 1 would be hard bc she'd move to greet the stranger and be pet
Test 6 would be hard bc I've never asked her to do this before, but with practice I think she would get it right away.
Test 8 will be the hardest bc she will get all excited to see the other dog, and will sniff the dog with her tail wagging about a mile a minute. Once she sniffed the other dog though she'll go back to hanging out with me and she'll act like the other dog doesn't exist.

Everything else will be easy.
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  #13  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:21 PM
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Romy: Did they have to do off-leash testing for TDI? and where you inside/outside and inside a ring/fence or outside one?
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:30 PM
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No they were on leash for the TDI test, it was in an indoor arena. I think our trainer's way of doing things seems to be training for a step above the requirements, and then you'll be good to go for the actual test.

Another thing that helps a lot is to take your dog out for a looong loooong run/walk/play session in a field etc. before the test.
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  #15  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:30 PM
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requiring an unrestrained out of sight stay for a CGC or TDI is way beyond what is reasonable.

WAY beyond.
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  #16  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedyreRottweilers View Post
requiring an unrestrained out of sight stay for a CGC or TDI is way beyond what is reasonable.

WAY beyond.
yeah... I don't think I could get my dogs to do that.... ever....
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  #17  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:40 PM
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It can be done, Xp. It is a requirement of the Open class in AKC obedience. But it should not be asked of a dog at CGC or TDI levels IMO.

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  #18  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedyreRottweilers View Post
requiring an unrestrained out of sight stay for a CGC or TDI is way beyond what is reasonable.

WAY beyond.
The TDI tester doesn't require it, my regular trainer does. It might be unreasonable for those tests...but it sure is handy and gives me peace of mind knowing that he can do it.

Anyway, if someone taking her class couldn't do it and wanted their CGC, all they'd have to do it go to Petsmart and pay the $10 to get it there.
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  #19  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:42 PM
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It is SUPER to have a dog who is good on OOS stays.

I just don't think it should be a requirement to pass the CGC test. Maybe it could go for extra credit.
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  #20  
Old 09-11-2008, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xpaeanx View Post
yeah... I don't think I could get my dogs to do that.... ever....
If I can get Ozzy to do it, then you certainly can do it! It just takes time. I've been building Ozzys stay for just about all his life. He has a very nice, almost rock solid stay. Out of sight or not. The only thing that can make him break a stay now is a frisbee or a rabbit. We're still working on it. Also, he may not stay if there are new dogs around. He will stay when dogs he knows are running and playing around him, but with his DA/DR problems I'm doubtful he would hold a stay.
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