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Old 09-09-2008, 11:51 AM
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Default walking issues

I have a siberian and while it is her instinct to pull, i want her to walk abit more nicely while on a leash yes this may be asking for a miracle of a sibe, but i'm sure she can distinguish that her harness is for pulling and her lead is for walking without pulling my arm from its socket!

I have tried several techniques but she is stubborn, anybody on here that has a sibe that walks nicely?
Or some tips and advice would be graetefull.
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Old 09-09-2008, 12:47 PM
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What kind of techniques did you try?

My dog used to be "terrierble" on the leash... and I tried a lot of different things. What helped us at last was stopping when she pulled. I made her come by my side and sit down everytime she would pull and praised her a lot if she walked nicely.

Yes, it did take us an hour to walk around the block the first month..lol... but she got better with time.
I also made sure that I started walking her in areas where there wasn't too much going on that was going to distract her.
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Old 09-09-2008, 01:38 PM
convey2web convey2web is offline
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Hi. Well there are several issues at play here. One is, do you have the dominant role in your relationship with the dog? By that I mean, when you in and out of the house does the dog lead? Pulling is sometimes a dominant role. He wants to show you the way. You should be using a correction collar and keep it high on the neck close to the skull. Also when putting it on you should see a "P" shape. When you walk, if the dog starts to pull give him a slight correct. If that does not help, put him in a sit position. Start walking by taking a step with your left foot and saying the command "heel". Again, if the dog start to lead or pass you give a slight correct with a light jerk of the lead. Follow this and do it in a controlled environment at first and then venture out with more distractions.

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Old 09-09-2008, 02:00 PM
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In reply to the above post:

[sarcasm on] Oh yeah.. how could I forget. Your dog pulls... he is challenging your authority. You have to show him who is the boss. If jerking him with a correction collar on doesn't help- don't hesitate to alpha roll him. [sarcasm off]
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Old 09-09-2008, 02:58 PM
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OK, let's get over pulling as an attempt at dominating the owner. There simply isn't any good evidence that suggests that there is a correlation between pulling and dominance issues (say, growling or biting at the owner). If you want to read more about how unlikely that is, check the thread from a few days ago.

Dogs pull bc they want to go faster than you do. Jules' advice is great- show her that pulling makes the action stop, which is totally the opposite of what she is trying to accomplish when she pulls. Unlike Jules, I don't make the dogs come back, I just wait until they let the slack into the leash. As soon as that happens I mark it (click or say "good") and immediately walk forward again. Either method will work, just pick the response you require and be consistent about exactly what she has to do to make the walk start again. The most important part is that you pick an amount of pulling that triggers the dreaded stop. (I let dogs make a slight pressure on the leash so that we can feel one another. I stop when they start leaning into the pressure and making me hold them back.) It will take her a while to make the connection, so be prepared for several days of not going very far.

I would recommend starting walks on harness to get the energy out. Once she is calmer, switch to the lead on her collar and practice the no pull training. I would also recommend running her lead from her collar, under one front leg and back up to your chest. This will give you some added advantage against the pulling. With the leash in this position every pull pulls her head down which is naturally uncomfortable and it's a new experience which will help to break those old habits and let her know the rules have changed. Using the leash in this position speeds the training considerably in my experience. With my dogs, that is the signal that pulling is no longer allowed. If I don't want to enforce discipline I just put the leash in a normal position and I can rush along without worrying about the dog "getting away with" the pulling. Although, the harness is an even clearer distinction so I would stick with this in your case.

When practicing the no pulling, make sure you are not focused on going anywhere, as you'll start to let little pulls slide and then your dog will get confused. If you want to walk normally again, just wait until she is doing a great job, tell her how great she is and switch back to the harness. So, now the harness walking is a reward for her good behavior and you can go back to more relaxing walking.

Good Luck!
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Old 09-09-2008, 03:05 PM
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Have you tried a pinch collar?!? I know some people think "its so horrible and hurts the dog" When in reality if used PROPERLY it just mimics what the mother and or litter mates would do when they would get out of hand......

Alot of people Also make the mistake of "oh my dog is a larger breed so i need a big one" No not true and long as it fits Snuggly the thinner ones are ideal.....

It should be positioned on the upper part of the neck sort of like how you would use a "choke" collar.


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Old 09-09-2008, 03:12 PM
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Maybe others can add more to this by suggesting certain treats. I have noticed that some dogs as soon as they get outside they cannot focus even if they are just in their back yard. I mean NOTHING gets their attention.

I notice this particulary with (my dogs) hound breeds. You can't take the tracking thats there naturally out of a dog for example. If a squirrel was just there they don't care what you have or are doing they are in their own doggy world. Maybe some hints from hunters on this one will work.

Can you suggest some super addicting treats that will grab any dogs attention?
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Old 09-09-2008, 03:24 PM
Sch3Dana Sch3Dana is offline
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Quote:
Have you tried a pinch collar?!? I know some people think "its so horrible and hurts the dog" When in reality if used PROPERLY it just mimics what the mother and or litter mates would do when they would get out of hand......
The problem with a pinch collar at this stage is that the dog won't have any idea what she is getting corrected for (mother and litter mates do not enforce leash manners or anything else so foreign to a dog's basic nature so that analogy doesn't work here). She's quite likely to learn it means nothing and just get increasingly insensitive and slowly work back to her old pulling- yes, many dogs learn to pull into a pinch quite well when it's used without a sensible training program. Or, like many huskies, she'll learn to scream to make the pulling stop- try continuing to pull on a dog's leash in front of your neighbors when she's screaming like you are killing her. Screaming works to stop correction and huskies love to learn that one

The real problem with pulling is that it works to get a dog moving forward. When you teach them that it stops the movement, you gain a lot of control without a lot of force and fight. If you later want to add more correction to make it more reliable, even around distractions, then that makes sense. I have no objection to pinch collars. But they should never be used to teach- only to reinforce known behaviors. If you are pulling (or jerking) on a strong tool like a pinch very often, then to me you are not using it properly. This sort of not-so-great training will work well on dog's bred to "take it", like GSDs and labs. It will tend to produce really bad results with breeds not bred for obedience, like huskies and asian breeds.
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Old 09-09-2008, 04:49 PM
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I've a feeling that dominant post was just

I agree with stopping forward movement to stop the pulling, another method I've seen used is to turn the opposite way and walk, this tends to also cause the dog to pay more attention to where you move, because who knows where that crazy person is gonna go next!

Whichever you try, keep in mind that it will, as was pointed out, take you an hour to go around the block
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Old 09-09-2008, 05:03 PM
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I'd like to know what you've tried first, I hate to see a prong on a dog when no other really good methods have been used for a consistent period of time.

Phoebe has a bit of a pull habit, i am trying to get her to a point where she can get her CGC so no pulling, she's 18 pounds so her owners don't care at all.
I would stop and walk backwards if she got to the end of the leash right before I went backwards I'd say "slooow". she's have to turn and walk backwards and when she got to my side we'd go forwards again. Now if she's getting close I can say "slow" and she does just that.

For her I have it on command because the behavior is so infrequent and because her own owners would not do this, they will let her pull so I need it to be an asked for behavior. For you I'd just walk backwards every time, no command necessary unless you'd like it as a warning sort of thing, if you are having trouble physically moving backwards because of your dog's strength then try a no pull harness so she has no leverage and cannot physically pull you. Still do the training though even if she cannot pull with the harness.

The first few times she may try harder to pull as you back up or even go on her hind legs to keep from turning and going the other way, eventually it will be easier though when she realizes that it won't work. Then she'll stop pulling so she does not have to go in the way she does not want to.
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