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  #11  
Old 08-21-2008, 05:28 AM
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ihartgonzo ihartgonzo is offline
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Originally Posted by ma-vie-en-vert View Post
Is there a way I can get her to sit and stay without her completely bolting out the door? Cuz she's a big dog already and she won't even sit and stay for her leash to go on. She'll sit, and stay and then as soon as I reach down to attach her leash she just gets all crazy and jumpy and ahh. And when trying to get her to wait for me to open the door, as soon as it's cracked the tiniest bit, she just bolts, with me being dragged behind, lol.
Yes. It will take some patience, and you HAVE TO be consistent, but it's not all that complicated.

Every time you attach her leash she MUST be sitting. If she gets up from the sit when you're about to attach it, turn around and ignore her. The leash only goes on when she's calmly sitting.

Teach her a solid "wait". Make her sit, and hold your hand out in front of you, while saying the command in a calm voice. Take one step. If she is still seated, tell her to come and reward. Progress to two steps, then three, etc, etc, until you can walk a mile away with her sitting and waiting. Remember that you need to MASTER commands in "boring" environments (like your house, or your backyard) before you can expect her to MASTER them in exciting environments or situations (such as when she knows she's going out for a walk, when she's out on a walk, etc).

Every time you're going out the door, have her sit in front of the door (far enough away that the door won't hit her of course), and tell her to "wait". The second she gets up, close the door and move her into a sit again, repeating the "wait" command. Repeat this process as many times as necessary, until she figures out that she is not getting out of the door unless she is sitting and waiting politely. She can ONLY get up when you release her, by either telling her "ok", "release", "come", etc. Use your body language to convey to her that she needs to be waiting... by leaning forward, blocking the doorway, and such. Body language goes a long way. You should do this in EVERY doorway, if possible, even going into the backyard. She needs to know that doorways cannot be crossed until she's given the "ok". When I take my boys on walks, I will make them wait before opening the door, then wait again on the front stoop, then wait again on the curb. The door can be left wide open at any time of day, with people coming in and out, and they won't cross the doorway for anything because they know it isn't ok until they're told it is. This is a REALLY important habit to teach, and it could save your dog's life!

I definitely recommend training her before she has eaten at all. Even better, make her work for her meals, by going through her commands and rewarding her with pieces of kibble. Tell your parents that if they want to spoil her for dinner, they have to make her WORK for it. Obedience training is just as tiring, if not moreso, than physical exercise... and it will make for a more responsive, well behaved pup, too. : )
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  #12  
Old 08-21-2008, 08:36 PM
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lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
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Originally Posted by ma-vie-en-vert View Post
When in the house, the only time she's ever hyper is when someone comes to the door or when we initiate the game. Otherwise she's almost perfectly behaved. She lays down and just kind of chills out and when she does this she gets rewarded with lots of hugs and cuddles, lol.
Maybe I don't understand the problem.... You said in your OP that she is constantly hyper and never calms down. What exactly is the problem??
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  #13  
Old 08-21-2008, 11:50 PM
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ma-vie-en-vert ma-vie-en-vert is offline
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Maybe I don't understand the problem.... You said in your OP that she is constantly hyper and never calms down. What exactly is the problem??
I guess I said explained it wrong. When it comes to me trying to train her, I guess she thinks its a game? And then she gets all excited and gets distracted really easily so I don't get anywhere with her.

Does that make sense? lol
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  #14  
Old 08-22-2008, 01:22 AM
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Have you tried teaching her "dog zen"? lol!

Seriously though, we went through this with every foster, and it helped them get adopted so much faster. For this exercise, don't say or a word or make a sound. Your dog must learn doggy zen through experience.

1. Take a really good treat, and hold it in front of the dog's nose in the palm of your hand. Be relaxed. Happy. You have to be zen for the dog to learn. They feed off our emotions, so if you are calm it will help your dog to make progress.

2. The dog will likely try to snarf the treat out of your hand. Just smile and close your hand. The dog may lick your fist, she may whine, she may bark, but she may not lick the treat.

3. As soon as you dog stops licking, start to open your hand. When you first begin the exercise, the dog will probably get very excited and try to snarf it out of your hand again. If this happens just smile and close your fist before the dog gets a chance to taste the treat. Keep it closed until the dog backs off again.

4. Repeat step 3 many, many, many times. As many as it takes to get to step 5. Do not give up! It took me 3 hours to get through the first session with Tengu. After the first session the next go so much faster. Usually less than 10 minutes for the second one. They learn a lot the first time. Sometimes the dog learns very fast, I think it only took Seamus 20 minutes to finish the first session.

5. When you open your fist and the dog is not trying to take the treat, is sitting politely and looking uninterested then it may have the treat.

Remember, to get the treat, you must not want the treat.

It sounds silly and time consuming, but what this teaches is impulse control. It teaches the dog how to calm itself down when it is excited/anxious. IMO it is one of the most important things to teach a dog. This concept is the basis for teaching other impulse control behaviors, the kind that keep a dog from leaping out a car door when you open it, from bolting past you out the front door, from snatching the hotdog your kid drops, from chasing those deer a mere arms length away. If you are having a hard time getting her to calm down for training, this will probably help. A lot.
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  #15  
Old 08-22-2008, 03:00 AM
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ma-vie-en-vert ma-vie-en-vert is offline
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Oh wow, I'll try it, but I'm pretty sure I already know how it will end.

Me being tackled to the floor lol.
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  #16  
Old 08-22-2008, 07:38 AM
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lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
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^^^Make sure you don't drop the treat while you're falling.
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  #17  
Old 08-22-2008, 02:01 PM
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I'll try not to haha.
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  #18  
Old 08-22-2008, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Make sure you don't drop the treat while you're falling.
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  #19  
Old 08-22-2008, 02:35 PM
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ma-vie-en-vert ma-vie-en-vert is offline
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Pfft, don't laugh at me! It's not fun when a dog that i'm only 15-20 lbs heavier than jumps on me, haha.
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  #20  
Old 08-22-2008, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Romy View Post
Have you tried teaching her "dog zen"? lol!

Seriously though, we went through this with every foster, and it helped them get adopted so much faster. For this exercise, don't say or a word or make a sound. Your dog must learn doggy zen through experience.

1. Take a really good treat, and hold it in front of the dog's nose in the palm of your hand. Be relaxed. Happy. You have to be zen for the dog to learn. They feed off our emotions, so if you are calm it will help your dog to make progress.

2. The dog will likely try to snarf the treat out of your hand. Just smile and close your hand. The dog may lick your fist, she may whine, she may bark, but she may not lick the treat.

3. As soon as you dog stops licking, start to open your hand. When you first begin the exercise, the dog will probably get very excited and try to snarf it out of your hand again. If this happens just smile and close your fist before the dog gets a chance to taste the treat. Keep it closed until the dog backs off again.

4. Repeat step 3 many, many, many times. As many as it takes to get to step 5. Do not give up! It took me 3 hours to get through the first session with Tengu. After the first session the next go so much faster. Usually less than 10 minutes for the second one. They learn a lot the first time. Sometimes the dog learns very fast, I think it only took Seamus 20 minutes to finish the first session.

5. When you open your fist and the dog is not trying to take the treat, is sitting politely and looking uninterested then it may have the treat.

Remember, to get the treat, you must not want the treat.

It sounds silly and time consuming, but what this teaches is impulse control. It teaches the dog how to calm itself down when it is excited/anxious. IMO it is one of the most important things to teach a dog. This concept is the basis for teaching other impulse control behaviors, the kind that keep a dog from leaping out a car door when you open it, from bolting past you out the front door, from snatching the hotdog your kid drops, from chasing those deer a mere arms length away. If you are having a hard time getting her to calm down for training, this will probably help. A lot.
I know this game as It's Your Choice.
But a little bit different, instead rewarding them with the treat that was in the hand, have a reward (treat) in a pocket and reward from the other hand with the one from the pocket.

The other thing, is opening and closing the hand several times in a row, if the dog starts to move towards the hand, close the fist. When they back up and sit down, open the fist again, if they don't move towards it, reward from the other hand with a higher valued reward that was waiting in your pocket.

It doesn't take the dogs long to figure it out, usually just a few minutes.

Good luck
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