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Old 06-19-2008, 09:54 PM
BigBlock BigBlock is offline
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Default Dachshund can't hold his bladder when he gets excited?

I have a long hair Dachshund about 16 months old. He's mostly potty trained, to go outside, however, every time he gets really excited to see someone, he loses control and pees all over the floor. I don't think he's doing it on purpose and I can't really punish him for it, but what can I do? I mean, shouldn't a 16 month old dog be able to control himself by now?

My best friend and "old" dog did this when he was a puppy too, but quickly grew out of it.
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Old 06-19-2008, 10:15 PM
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Duke'sMommy Duke'sMommy is offline
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My dog does this everytime he sees my Dad. He is 2 years 4 months. And I really dont think he will grow out of this.

If someone has advice I would like to hear it as well.

The only thing I found that somewhat works is to make sure he pees right before he sees my dad and that limits what comes out.
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Old 06-19-2008, 10:26 PM
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I think about the only thing you can do is try not to let your dog get too excited. Maybe teach him that when he gets that excited the person leaves. Or he has to leave.

Also make sure that people kneel/sit on the floor to pet him, and don't bend over him or reach over his head to pet.... This will cause submissive peeing. At the same time I'd suggest no one ever pet your puppy if he's rolled over exposing his belly... this is a submissive posture, and petting him only encourages him to be submissive.
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:20 AM
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Mac had this issue when she was younger, she did eventually grow out of it along with some extra training. Like as soon as we got home, make no fuss over her, straight outside for pee time and such. She still has accidents if we have been away for a few ho0urs, get home and she might be getting ready to go out anyway and she gets too excited but she's pretty good
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:28 AM
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My miniature dachshund Jannah did this until she was spayed. Is your dog spayed? Jannah was spayed at about a year and a half.

Everytime she met a new person on walks, or when she saw my grandmother, or my best friend (People she didn't see everyday) she would cower/roll over on her back and urinate on herself.

After she was spayed she just stopped doing it altogether for some reason. We didn't do anything different.
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Old 06-20-2008, 07:09 AM
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My 2nd wirehair daskhund use to do this!.
The only way to deal with it,was to say hello to her,outside cos not paying attention,made it worse.
If we had company,she was taken outside,just before they came so that we could minimize the problem.
She did it till she died!.
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Old 06-20-2008, 01:25 PM
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My little dog, who we think is a dachshund/schauzer mix, does this sometimes. Its usually only a small amount. I second the "no fuss when you come home" advice. Also, if say my parents are coming back home from having gone out of town, I take him outside to greet them to avoid a mess in the house. He's gotten much better though, and rarely does it anymore at home. He will still pee all over the floor when I pick him up from doggie daycare and stuff.
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Old 06-20-2008, 02:26 PM
Suzzie Suzzie is offline
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i've read a bit about using reverse dominance training with these types of dogs, maybe look into that...
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:38 AM
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Sounds like either submissive or excitement urination. Training him not to get so excited can help. You can do this by practicing the returning home/come for a visit ritual over and over while not reacting to his excitment, only paying him attention when he is really calm, usually several minutes after you or the visitor arrives. Obedience training can also be a big help, especially training that uses treats as the reward, as most dogs do not pee for a cookie Seriously, if he is focused on earning treats, his mood won't tend to encourage peeing.

I would strongly recommend place training- teach him to go to his bed and stay on. Then practice around people and mild distractions, then start practicing after you've been home a few minutes, then as you get home, then as a visitor comes, but ignores him, then as a visitor comes in and greets him. It will take a long time to get to this point, but it will help a ton with the peeing problem. Staying on the bed increases his distance from the person and they can control the attention- if he starts to get to wild, they walk away and he has to calm down again before they will go back with treats and pets. Works great!

Good Luck!
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Old 06-24-2008, 07:05 PM
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my parents had a dachshund with the same problem.. the way that I had them fix this problem was to tell the people coming into the house to basically ignore the dog until he calmed down not even eye contact and it seemed 2 work well
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