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  #11  
Old 03-31-2008, 12:41 PM
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SarahFair SarahFair is offline
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Great thank you guys!
Im sad because I have to wait till tom. to see if he can come home with us yet..
I hope I am not getting all excited to be shot down..
I mean why would it take a week for an owner to call back?
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  #12  
Old 03-31-2008, 12:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahFair View Post
Great thank you guys!
Im sad because I have to wait till tom. to see if he can come home with us yet..
I hope I am not getting all excited to be shot down..
I mean why would it take a week for an owner to call back?
Because the owner sucks. Some don't want to pay the fee to get their dog back. I worked at the Manassas City Animal Adoptin Center (the city shelter) for about a month and a half, and while I was there a beautiful boxer mix was brought in as a stray. She was friendly, knew multiple commands, and was a great dog. But owner left her there, didn't want to pay the fee to get her out. I don't know if she was ever adopted, because I left while she was still there.

If you want to see a good trainer, watch "Its Me or the Dog" on Animal Planet. There's a a good training show. One great episode was this woman who owned a chihuahua who bit and attacked her every time she tried to do anything with him, and Victoria Stillwell (the trainer) saw that the dog was scared and overwhelmed of his owner, and started them at the beginning with training. Part of the problem was the owner had always owned cats and thought that a small dog would act like a cat, lol.
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  #13  
Old 03-31-2008, 12:55 PM
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I have watched that show! She did go about it in another way..
But the dog is at a vets office..do they charge a fee? I guess they would.
Im sure they paid a pretty pinny for him, but some people I guess just dont care
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  #14  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:05 PM
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Dogs are social animals. You need to spend time becoming a part of your new dog's social group before you make corrections of any kind. Corrections from someone considered a stranger will create fear which will create avoidance or aggression, neither of which are useful. When you first get the dog, keep him on a leash at all times to prevent any misbehaviors, then you won't have anything to correct. If he tries to jump, use the leash to gently pull him to the side, knocking him off balance. If he sees food or toys he wants to steal, use the leash to stop him from getting there.

When you are not directly supervising him, crate him or keep him in a safely fenced yard or dog kennel. Practice training exercises every day, preferably several times per day in short sessions. An adult GSD should take his time bonding with you- these are reserved dogs, not retrievers who love everyone. Take him on long walks to satisfy his exercise needs and show him that you like to do the same things he does. Play non-competitive games with him like fetch or find-it. It doesn't really matter what you do with him as long as it is stress free and you both enjoy it.

After several weeks of getting to know each other you can add corrections for any inappropriate behaviors and begin incorporating them into your obedience training. But use your leash and correct him as if you are a human. Don't pretend to be a dog (like Cesar)- he knows you are not one. GSDs in particular have many years of intense breeding to respond well to traditional obedience training methods. Find a trainer that uses primarily positive methods and start a class or private lessons after a few weeks of bonding and trust building.

You should probably also search this forum for NILIF- nothing in life is free. And, do some research on raw diets. GSDs in particular need a really healthy diet. They tend to have a lot of allergies and digestive problems, so get him on an excellent diet right away. I would include probiotics, digestive enzymes and green tripe for all GSDs.

Good Luck with your new dog.
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  #15  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:06 PM
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When you meet him, just be confident. A GSD isn't a lab and isn't supposed to be overly friendly to strangers. If he's a good GSD he'll greet you and then be aloof. Project confidence and he'll accept you. It might take a few minutes, it might take a few days to gain his trust.

I don't agree with everything that CM does, but his way of introducing yourself to a strange adult dog is pretty good. When people around here hear CM's name, all they think of is him alpha rolling dogs. That isn't something you do when you are meeting a new dog and I agree, not the best way to handle an aggressive dog. I guarantee you my mild mannered GSD would bite you if you tried rolling him, or putting him in any position he didn't want to be in. Even I don't try and roll him over to examine him, I take my time and pet and praise him, and he'll give up is belly, and then I can check him out. You don't have to be bending down over the dog and being all in it's face either, that's a good way to get bit by a dog that might have fear issues.

Good luck, I hope everything goes well with him. GSDs are great dogs, very intelligent, but require a lot of work to get a good end result.
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  #16  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:19 PM
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Haha I wasnt going to 'alpha roll' him the min I met him! lol

Confidence, got it.
I guess what I am trying to ask is..
How do I go in there, act confident but without looking like I dont have any interest in the dog.
I think alot of people look at it like 'why isnt she being all lovey dovey with him? It must not be a good fit...'
Thats what Im afraid of
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  #17  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:19 PM
Sch3Dana Sch3Dana is offline
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Quote:
I guarantee you my mild mannered GSD would bite you if you tried rolling him, or putting him in any position he didn't want to be in.
The protection breeds are specifically bred to resist this sort of excessively dominant handling, at least from strangers. But, they don't like it from their owners either. As Dan says, teach your dog to lay on his back when you need to examine him. Most dogs are very agreeable when they know what you want from them.

And, FYI, dogs do not "alpha roll" one another- neither do wolves. The dominant animals gives a threat display and the submissive animal rolls himself as a sign of appeasement. The whole alpha roll idea is a really poor interpretation of that process. If you want to copy a dominant wolf well, growl, snarl and stand over your dog til he rolls himself over and pees. I'm not sure what you will get out of it though. Certainly not a recall or a down stay- other things that wolves and dogs do not demand of one another.
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  #18  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahFair View Post
Haha I wasnt going to 'alpha roll' him the min I met him! lol

Confidence, got it.
I guess what I am trying to ask is..
How do I go in there, act confident but without looking like I dont have any interest in the dog.
I think alot of people look at it like 'why isnt she being all lovey dovey with him? It must not be a good fit...'
Thats what Im afraid of
Some people might not agree, but this is how I'd approach a strange dog whose background I was not familiar with. Stand straight and tall and ignore him at first. Don't look him directly the eyes, that is a challenge. Allow him to approach you and sniff. After a few minutes when he's comfortable with you, offer him a treat and pet him. Don't pet him on top of the head, show him the back of your hand from in front of him, let him sniff, and then pet him under the chin and on the front of his chest. If he's got any kind of hand fear (from being hit) you don't want to have your open palm over the top of him. If he sits and lets you pet him, great.
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  #19  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:55 PM
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You are recieving some great advice, I would only add that when I greet a strange dog that I never reach for them. I keep my arms and hands hanging relaxed at my sides, usually it only takes a moment or two (or less) for that dog to tell me that they accept me and want to be petted/stroked etc. I also never get in their face. I haven't been bitten yet and plan on keeping it that why lol.
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  #20  
Old 03-31-2008, 01:55 PM
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SarahFair SarahFair is offline
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Ok the eye thing! I am so glad you brought that up! I have heard this and am not certain what 'look in the eye' really means. When I look at something I usually look at the eyes. Not staring but looking. What is a challenging look and what is just looking?
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