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  #11  
Old 03-08-2008, 11:09 AM
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This just makes me sad and sick. Those poor families.

In Tucson, tethering was against the law because it got 120 degrees, out, so if a dog got tangled, or knocked over it's water, or the sun changed position, you could easily have a dead dog on your hands within an hour.

That is a pretty extreme case however. Most places don't have such a hostile environment, and tethers can be a good way to keep them safe. Even in Tucson, we had to tether Tengu (the super anxiety shepherd) if we left her out unsupervised for twenty minutes because she would literally bite through the fence boards and run down the street trying to find us. In fact, she did that exact thing twice, and got a huge splinter in her gums the second time.
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  #12  
Old 03-08-2008, 11:11 AM
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lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
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THe article was written about Austin, TX. I'm sure it gets pretty hot there, too.
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  #13  
Old 03-08-2008, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
The article does make a good point, though - if low-income people have a hard time supporting themselves and their kids, how can they be expected to provide proper care to a dog, especially a large-breed? We all know how much it costs to feed (even low-quality food), vaccinate, and provide vet care to a dog. If they can't provide even the cheapest care, they will be cited for animal neglect.


But the problem is that it's almost impossible to enforce time limits on tethering, and it's too expensive to hire more AC officers.


So how to we make it a law that owners socalize dogs and train them so that they are less likely to bite?? That's also almost impossible, and even worse when you consider that these are low-income people who certainly don't have the money for training, and probably don't have time to socialize their dog.


I don't think it's that simple. I don't know whether I agree with the law or not, but I certainly understand why it is in place. I have always suggested that people not leave their dogs outside if they are not home, and if the dog is causing problems (barking, digging, etc.) they should not be outside unsupervised at all. Maybe if people had done this, we wouldn't have had to make laws restricting owners.
Well, there are plenty of low, or lower, income people who CAN afford to have a dog. They just may not be able to afford to have a fence. Or they may not live somewhere where a fence is feasible. Perhaps our low income person is single and spends most of their free cash on their dog . . . I could spend a whole lot less on Sarama than I do and still give her decent care. I probably could have afforded in when I was in school, if I had been careful with my money.

The idea behind a time limit on tethering a dog is much the same as an anti-tether law. If its the dog can't be chained at a certain time, then you check at that time. If its no longer than, you ask the neighbors, who are probably the ones who called you. However, there is a selective enforcement issue. Its probably better to examine the dog for health and temperment, to see if there is a problem, rather than making an artibrary rule (unless you live somewhere like Tuscon, where that law makes perfect sense).

No, you can't pass a law that makes people socialize their dogs. However, this law won't do that either. You can pass a law, and spend more money on enforcement, banning neglect, abuse, or cracking down on dogs that have manifested aggressive behavior towards humans in the past. As for low income people not having time for training, you can in fact train a dog in 15 minutes a day. You socialize it by taking it places in your free time. You don't need lessons, you can get a book from the library. The results may not be as good as people with more time and money, but for a very long time, many people, including very poor ones, have had perfectly nice dogs.

Yes, one should generally not leave the dog out without supervision, but there any many situations in which that is the best option for some owners. And anti-thethering laws often make it illegal to leave the dog tethered when you ARE home, or even if you are also present in the yard. I don't leave my dog outside when no one is home (she's fenced, not tethered, but I have a very high fence), but she's often out there when someone is home. I figure she's rather be out than crated, and there are times I can't keep an eye on her.

There are laws restricting owners because of a fairly small portion dog owners who are seriously irresponsible. We should not all be punished for their misbehavior.

And yes, hiring more AC is expensive. BUt as we've found out where restrictive dog laws exist, when AC runs around enforcing useless laws and confiscating dogs from perfectly good homes, it costs a lot of money too . . . and AC so busy they don't have time to deal with the real problems.
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  #14  
Old 03-08-2008, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
THe article was written about Austin, TX. I'm sure it gets pretty hot there, too.
Providing shade for a dog is easy enough. Something as simple as a plyboard lean-to, or locating the chain near the shade of the house will do. There are also small wading pools or big water buckets. If temperature is a factor, what about owning a dog if you live in a house with no air conditioning, as I have had to cope with before? A dog crated with nothing but a fan on him during an Oklahoma summer is arguably suffering more than a dog tied out in the yard with access to shade.

Quote:
The article does make a good point, though - if low-income people have a hard time supporting themselves and their kids, how can they be expected to provide proper care to a dog, especially a large-breed? We all know how much it costs to feed (even low-quality food), vaccinate, and provide vet care to a dog. If they can't provide even the cheapest care, they will be cited for animal neglect.
There is a difference between tapping the bank account dry to save a dog's life, and being expected to do so to build a fence because extreme animal rights groups say we should. We just bought a house, and don't have a fence yet. I use a system of tie-outs and leash-walking to exercise my young dogs who can't be trusted off-leash. If someone were to get injured, I've got the tools here for emergency treatment, and will beg and borrow for anything over and beyond that. Or our bills will have to go unpaid. But to suggest that we should go into hock for something that is essentially a luxury (fencing) is really ridiculous.

Quote:
So how to we make it a law that owners socalize dogs and train them so that they are less likely to bite??
You can't. And I don't think the anti-tether crowd is claiming that their law does this.

Quote:
But the problem is that it's almost impossible to enforce time limits on tethering, and it's too expensive to hire more AC officers.
But yet they can find enough ACOs to go and take someone's dog if they're tied up while the social worker visits. IMHO, its a strategy to make dogs a commodity for the wealthy. Get them out of those poor ghetto homes that only make $20K a year, and leave them only for the upper crust. Let the dog become the same thing as owning a Porsche. No family dogs, unless you're the right family.
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  #15  
Old 03-08-2008, 04:09 PM
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BTW, I realize my post was a bit curt, but it was not intended to be rude. As a person living in a home whose annual income is less than $30K, but who still finds the money to give her dogs the best, I resent these kinds of laws.
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  #16  
Old 03-08-2008, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
The article does make a good point, though - if low-income people have a hard time supporting themselves and their kids, how can they be expected to provide proper care to a dog, especially a large-breed? We all know how much it costs to feed (even low-quality food), vaccinate, and provide vet care to a dog. If they can't provide even the cheapest care, they will be cited for animal neglect.
I was and still am what you would call low income. Last year I was a senior in high school living on my own (basically, i lived with my boyfriend not my parents) with a injured horse, a large shepard and a disabled APBT. They all got the best care money could buy inmy area. The best vet, the best food at times or a mix of cheap kibble and raw. While sometimes I was lucky to get lunch. My money went to my animals to have theirs lives the best and Walker will have that even with the baby . So that statement does get to me. Low income doesnt mean well cared for dogs or animals.
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