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  #1  
Old 10-17-2007, 12:54 PM
deepaksikkanthar deepaksikkanthar is offline
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Default labrador retriever holes

my dog noddy is eight months old . he suddenly had diarrhea and started losing one vet who i took him to said he is fine and gave some injection . his conditioned worsened he became really week and started drooling and stopped eating . i took him to another vet who gave some medicines and after the medicines noddy became alright . but she checked the anus and said because of the prolonged wetness there is a hole and gave some spray and ointment to prevent maggot infection . now today when i was gioving the medicines i checked his mouth and found out same kind of hole his lips . what could be the problem .please soemone help me and am sorry for the long post .
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Old 10-17-2007, 01:43 PM
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Do you have a picture of either end ?? Something sounds fishy .
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Old 10-17-2007, 02:01 PM
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That does sound odd - pictures would be helpful as well as what the vet actually diagnosed and the medications given.
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:44 PM
deepaksikkanthar deepaksikkanthar is offline
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am sorry i am not able to post pictures because i dont have a digital camera and my camera phone is in service centre . i examined the holes today and took out live maggots out of it . now what can i do to get rid of them completely . they are jus holes no dead tuissues or darkened area around them .
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:49 PM
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Maggots live off of rotten tissue !!!! VET!!!!
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:50 PM
deepaksikkanthar deepaksikkanthar is offline
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but saw in the net they do feed on living tissues . what if they eat into his internal organs ?
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:50 PM
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Id have another opinion taken

Maggots dont eat living tissue, they only consume dead tissue, there sounds like something is very wrong here. Go see a different vet immediately
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Old 10-18-2007, 01:02 PM
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Myiasis is a the term used to describe a maggot infestation. Maggots are fly larva that feed on necrotic and dying tissue. Especially prone are those pets confined to the outdoors with situations in which their skin remains moist. This includes pets with draining wounds, urine or fecal stained hair coats, or bacterial skin infections. Sustained skin moisture can cause damage, inflammation and infection setting up a favorable environment for maggots. This applies especially to weak and debilitated pets.

As with fleas and ticks, maggots can be a threat to household pets. Flies reproduce rapidly in the summer months and maggots can come in large numbers, creating a maggot infestation and a high risk of myiasis in pets. Despite the fact that most maggots only eat dead tissue, some maggots, such as certain botfly larvae, spend part of their lifecycle as parasites under the skin of living animals. They can be painful and present a serious risk to pets or any other animals. Humans are not immune to the feeding habits of maggots and can also contract myiasis. Interaction between humans and maggots usually occurs near garbage cans, dead animals, rotten food, and other breeding grounds for maggots.
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Old 10-18-2007, 02:01 PM
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So by posting that you are making excuses as to why it's fine to have maggots living on your dog. Either vet it or stop posting about it. None of us are vets. Sounds like you need one.
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Old 10-18-2007, 02:03 PM
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So if you have had it properly diagnosed and are treating it the way that has been identified and prescribed by your vet, a recognized DVM, why are you asking what is wrong? Do you not believe your vet has made a proper diagnosis and prescribing?

And in addition the maggot species that does eat living tissue is described as forming in mainly rancid conditions. Do you know when or where these conditions came from? identifying the source is usually the best step to the answer.
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