Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Dog Breeds


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 06-05-2007, 09:32 PM
fomorii56 fomorii56 is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 36
Default

I actually had not considered a dalmation. I had a very bad experience with a dalmation, was severely bit on the arm, and while I know I cant hold it against the breed, I've just never considered owning one. I'm also a little wary of german shepherds since pretty much everyone I know that has one has had health problems with them. Did your friend have any issues with the giant schnauzer and other dogs, I've heard they can be somewhat aggressive?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-05-2007, 09:56 PM
Whisper's Avatar
Whisper Whisper is offline
Kaleidoscopic Eye
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 13,746
Default

The dogs I've met that do well with horses are usually border collies, aussies, cattle dogs, and many mixed breeds. I've seen many mixed breeds who are great with horses. It depends much on the dog and their introduction and experiences with the animals, though of course some breeds will have more intense instincts such as prey drive to battle with more than others.
Really, a dog properly raised around horses shoudl not have too much trouble getting used to them.
My Millie (border collie mix) is wonderful around horses but Lucy (chihuahua/terrier mix) is not too great around them because she wasn't around horses when she was growing up like Millie was.
There are dogs of the same breed that have opposite reactions to horses and other livestock. If you have 4 other dogs, you know how to properly introduce dogs to horses, no?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-05-2007, 10:01 PM
fomorii56 fomorii56 is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 36
Default

The dogs we have now are not 'working' dogs. They pretty much just stay around the barn and people. They don't accompany us on trails. Only one of the dogs is mine, a rescue from severe neglect which left him mentally handicapped and hard of hearing. I just can't trust him to come out on a long trail ride with me. So introducing to horses, yes, but I haven't had any experience with a true working dog that would come off leash with me on a long ride in the open/woods. I actually dont know any collies, but I was always under the impression that they are extemely energetic. While at home I'd like a dog that is calmer, one that isnt always in work mode but knows the difference between being at home and 'working' out on a trail or a hike. Like I said, I dont know any collies, so please correct me if I'm wrong : )
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-05-2007, 10:01 PM
BostonBanker's Avatar
BostonBanker BostonBanker is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 8,354
Default

I thought about this the whole time I was in the shower, and OC brought up the two breeds that most popped into my mind - Boxers and Dals. Dalmations were originally bred to run alongside horses. I've met a bunch of Boxers I adored and that were great in barns. I'll never own a short-faced breed, but there have been boxers who have almost made me change my mind!

Retrievers are another possibility. Standard Poodle? Dobies?

I just think with both the herding and the hunting dogs, you will be fighting an uphill battle to get the behavior you want. You'll be asking them to ignore behaviors that have been bred into them for a long time.

Quote:
I was hoping to get a puppy because the dog I have now does not have an easy time welcoming new, adult dogs into the family.
I fear I may find myself in the same situation eventually, for the same reason. Unfortunately, because I'm not a huge puppy person! Again, with an adult rescue, you may be able to try out some dogs to see how they get along. But I do understand being in that position. Please keep in mind, with most of these breeds, you are going to be looking at a year and a half or so before they can really go out on big trail rides; just like the horses, you've got to let them grow and let the joints close before they do a lot of pounding on their legs (which you probably already know).
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-05-2007, 10:08 PM
Saje Saje is offline
Island dweller
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 23,932
Default

I think most athletic dogs could easily be taught to do what you ask. A nice puppy from a shelter would be ideal. Especially one that had some obvious GSD or Border Collie lines.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-06-2007, 08:37 AM
SummerRiot's Avatar
SummerRiot SummerRiot is offline
Dog Show Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 8,056
Default

I second the Dalmatian comment... I knew an AMAZING farm Dal, never raised with horses, was a rescue. First time she met the horses, she'd bring her toys over to them and try to play.
She never bothered the horses at all, but would happily trot along side them when riding, or just stay out of the way at the side lines when ring work was going on.

Dals have unbelievale amounts of energy to burn - they'd be awesome for trail riding purposes. Just MAKE SURE YOU SOCIALIZE as a young pup CONSISTANTLY...

The farm Dal I knew would NEVER harm a person that came into her properly - she'd let kids pull at her ears, poke her nose etc etc BUT as soon as another dog was on the property she wanted to hurt it..

So Socializing is imperative.

BCs would be another good choice - you'd have to train the BC not to herd YOU with youer horses though. There is a lady I used to trail with who brought along her BC and the BC kept circling the horses anywhere we went..
__________________
Riot
Nyxi
Tyr TT
Ares
Princess aka Tettles




Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-06-2007, 10:55 AM
Kmh1's Avatar
Kmh1 Kmh1 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Southern NJ
Posts: 472
Default

The two best "trail" and barn dogs I've ever known were both mixes. One was a medium sized GSD mix and one was a lab mix. I also knew one exceptional ACD--but overall I think its tough to overcome the instinct to herd the live stock with the herding breeds even though a lot of horse people have them.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-06-2007, 11:43 PM
pitbullpony's Avatar
pitbullpony pitbullpony is offline
BSL Can Be Beaten
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: ON, CAN
Posts: 711
Default Dogs for horses

I will say my dog is awesome with horses; not a very common breed however; so that would depend on what you are looking for.
She is submissive to the horses; non-threatening - the horses (even the cowhorses) all allow Kim to lie in their pens or chill out with them and they are not nervous or threatening to her at all. She will leave their pens if they say so; or we say so.

She has a long stride and a clear airway so can accompany us on trail rides; we usually go out for about 1-2 hours and she is happy plugging along beside or behind, never leaves the trail, always keeps an eye on us. She is a protective breed, so covers that requirement too.

I would say for a more common breed;
Boxer - choose a dog with the least extreme head you can; hard to breathe through the pushed up nose - but they are good dogs that are athletic and the boxers that I've known around horses are quiet and respectful, but as a rule they are bouncy, happy dogs.
Dalmatian - be very careful of temperament - Disney ruined this breed - as OC says; look for a working breeder that deals with horses if you can.
Doberman - good dogs again; obedient, watchful, stay away from the extreme chest; you want a conformationally balanced dog - they are more serious than the Boxer
GSD - be very careful and get an extensive health guarantee - HD, Pano, Osteoporosis, Epilepsy, Spinal Myelopathy, no drive, too much drive
Collies, aussies, ACD, BC - horses are not designed to be "herded". They are too flighty and delicate a critter - if you can't train your collie type to leave them alone - and provide them with another outlet for that drive to herd; I would leave this group alone. All ACDs, BCs I've seen on horse farms are either being yelled at constantly or are bothering the horses to no end.
I don't know any schnauzers, bouvs or black russian terriers; but they could probably keep up with the horse, would be more interested with protecting you than hunting (possibly).
Can't think of any more breeds I would like to have as horse dogs; but will say I have had the joy of riding with my stone cold APBT Indy; and he was a great dog to ride with; very respectful and obedient - but you'd have to find a cold one; and no guarantees with pups.
__________________

Jennifer Sider First Dog Off the Porch Custom Collars
Mom to Mitchell, Avalon, Ninja, Jiggs and Misty
Life is forever and everything is just an experience on the road to enlightenment.

Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-06-2007, 05:48 AM
EbonyDal's Avatar
EbonyDal EbonyDal is offline
Spot the Difference!
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 93
Default

Dalmatians were bred to go alongside horse-drawn carriages; mine have been exceptional trail-riding companions they like horses and have been easily trained to be around them and stay near on trails. Everyone has such good advice, I just wanted to share my experience. What a fun question; happy trails wih your new best friend, of whatever breed you choose =)
__________________
EBONY - Dalmatian (L)
JINX - Dalmatian TDI
JESTER SUMMER DAYLIGHT DD, TDI



~THANKYOU Brattina88 for my signature!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-07-2007, 08:18 PM
Dekka's Avatar
Dekka Dekka is offline
Just try me..
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 19,441
Default

I had a dalmation, got her from my farrier who bred them. She was a fantastic dog, very friendly and liked to stick close. And very elegant too.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:59 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site