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  #21  
Old 07-31-2005, 03:32 PM
yuckaduck
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The behaviour you have described is for wild stallions not trained stallions. Any stallion that goes nuts or insane even around a mare in heat has not been properly trained. We have four stallions here and not one of them kicks when anyone enters their corral or stalls. They do pasture breeding in most cases and they are on a routinely bases turned out with geldings. Hell in winter they all go out together. Never ever had a problem. Stallions can be a handful but please don't suggest that they are wild untameable beasts because that is far from the truth. Just like any other animal they require training and they require respect. I can guarantee it would be unadviseable for one of my stallions to kick or bite at me because they will find themselves on a lunge line and very very tired afterwards. My 2 & 3 year old human babies ride Joker with me on trail rides with mares, geldings and even another stallion which my husband rides. Never had a problem actually on our trail rides the mares are worse than the stallions. The only reason to not geld a stallion is if it is to improve the breed and to do breeding with. Otherwise by all means gelding is your best option. However my fences here are 5 feet in hight and no one jumps out or knocks it down. It is all wood fencing and there is no electric fence had bad experiences with that. All of my stallions can see out no problem and they are corralled side by side. No problems! It comes with the training and the breed. I have owned and dealt with many stallions and we had one that was a bit of a knot head but other than that there was never a problem. I actually show two of my stallions in shows and there are mares sometimes in heat in the same classes and again no problems. They are not all sex crazied maniacs.
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  #22  
Old 07-31-2005, 03:37 PM
stirder
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no, didnt say they are untameable. but after 26 years on horse back and from my parents nearly 60 years training horses, I will not tell anyone that horses are predictable and teddy bears. as I said I have been around some, but most of the ones Ive seen, no matter how safe to ride, require experienced riders/trainers. I suggest going to a horse forum, or better yet a stallion forum, and asking what they think. theres a reason very few people other than professional breeders keep stallions. I've ridden and trained a few, no they are not untrainable. I think some are even better than geldings, but they are tricky and can be extremely dangerous. she sounds like she is fairly new to horses if she has never heard of a stallion pen, or that boarders dont usually take stallions. thats not a bad thing, its great that she is in to horses and trying to learn. but I doubt her ability at this point.
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  #23  
Old 07-31-2005, 03:45 PM
yuckaduck
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I just felt you were making all stallions appear dangerous or untrainable and I strongly disagreed. I too have many many years experience with horses and stallions and I take great pride in training all my horses to be quiet dependable mounts, stallions, mare or geldings.
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  #24  
Old 07-31-2005, 03:51 PM
stirder
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I just meant that it takes a lot of experience, training, and patience for a stallion to be safe. the 2 safest we ever trained were one that we foaled and imprinted from birth. and the other was a wild mustang from the dakotahs. jon lyons broke him witha topless horse trailer, put the stallion into it, filled it with wheat grains. I was 12 and wasnt there but it was one of his clinics.
also I have red flags about the "will not geld him" statement. why not? the red flags are, you didnt want to neuter rocky, even mentioned you were considering breeding him. bred chihuahuas and sold the pups to buy a new dog. whats the problem with gelding this guy??? make him more manageable. maybe in a few years get another one and not geld him after you know what you are doing???
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  #25  
Old 07-31-2005, 04:01 PM
yuckaduck
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That sure makes more sense to me now maybe I just read wrong. I have imprinted one of these stallions from birth and one was imprinted from birth by someone who trains the way I do, bought him as a yearling. The other two were bought at a later date they were both 4 years old and wild monsters but I worked very very hard with them. There are to many kids who come for lessons so I can't have anything dangerous here, it just makes no sense to put kids in a dangerous situation. I have to agree with the won't geld statement. Why Not? Is he registered? Has he passed all health checks? Has he been xrayed? Has he been temperment tested? Breeding horses is much the same as breeding dogs believe it or not. If your stallion cannot improve the breed or contribute something good to the breed then it should not be left as a stallion. I have been disappointed before with foals that I thought hey here's my next stallion and it just did not work out, temperment, or confirmation wise. We all want to believe that our horse [stallion] is the best ever but we have to be realistic and responsible too.
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  #26  
Old 07-31-2005, 07:29 PM
stirder
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I dont know, you may have misunderstood but wouldnt say it was you fault. my thoughts sometimes come out than I can type and it doesnt ound as good as I thought it. I'll have to go back and read it, see if it sounds like what I intended to say.
I hear you about breeding and being dissapointed. we bred our cutting mare (a palomino quarter horse) to one of the countries top reining stallions from the Bar S Ranch in Texas (dont remember his name, have to ask my dad, but he was black quarter horse) years ago. we got a beautiful buckskin colt. we did imprint training and worked even harder on him than the last colt that was born (for those who arent horse people, a colt is a male, a philly is a female, a foal is both) and ended up with a yearling who acted as if he had been born wild and stayed that way for 10 years. both the stud and mare had the sweetest, gentlest temperaments ever. this little fella was possessed. we had a pro trainer test him and he said "shoot him". we of course didnt but we did sell him before too long. some are gentle as a teddy bear and you could practically twist their n**'s in a vice and theyd stand still. others are just too strong willed, too dominant, or whatever you wanna call it, to be trained/tamed.
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  #27  
Old 07-31-2005, 08:52 PM
yuckaduck
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colt is a male under four years old then becomes stallion if intact
gelding is an altered male
filly is a female under four years
mare is femle over four years
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  #28  
Old 07-31-2005, 09:09 PM
stirder
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okay, I forgot to be specific didnt I? thanks yuckaduck.
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  #29  
Old 07-31-2005, 09:22 PM
yuckaduck
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that's okay look at my spelling of female i forgot the a. getting very tired i guess.
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  #30  
Old 08-01-2005, 01:11 PM
yuckaduck
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I just got a call this morning from a first time horse owner who bought a stallion who was untrained. She has been asked to leave her boarding stable because they can't do anything with the horse and they say it is bordering dangerous. Well I told her she could board it at my place but only under the condition that she take lessons which are free with board and allow me to work on instilling so manners in this boy. Not all stallions recieve proper training and this is an example as to why most stables refuse stallions. Owners just don't have the knowledge or the time to instill proper manners.
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