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Old 05-04-2007, 06:03 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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I want to share a chapter of the book I am writing. It is one itty bitty part of my whole project. It is still in it's rough draft, but it might help prospective puppy buyers and people considering breeding their pet dogs. And most important of all, my hope is that it will help DOGS!


WHERE DO I GET MY DOG?

There are several niches to find a dog and I’ll discuss the main sources to assist you as you embark on your adventure to join the ranks of happy dog owners.

Purebred dogs-(reputable hobby breeders versus “back yard” breeders)

There is a huge over population of dogs in this world and there are various sources from where to choose a dog. Some people prefer purebred dogs because they have a good idea of what they’re getting in size, shape, coat color and length, ear placement and even a close estimate of their temperament or working ability.

All registered, purebred dogs must have a record of breeding going back several generations. These dogs must produce relatively uniform offspring. Breed Clubs and national clubs, such as the American or Canadian Kennel Clubs, have written standards for each recognized breed, which includes features such as size, shape, ear placement, angles within the skeletal system, coat texture and color, temperament, just to mention a very few of the concisely, detailed descriptions within a standard.

Reputable breeders strive for conforming to the written standard as closely as possible for their breed. Not every purebred dog of a specific breed will conform very closely to the standard. When these substandard dogs are bred, there is a deterioration of uniformity in the breed. Showing dogs in conformation classes is one way to determine, based on expert judges’ evaluations of the dogs and whether they are worthy to be bred. If a dog’s structure or temperament, for example, does not adhere to the written standard, he should not be bred as the homogeneity of the breed will be further lost with subsequent offspring. Sadly, in the dog show world, there are some controversial judgments made of some dogs, cases where the appearance of a dog is being sought without regard to his working ability, for instance. A balance of the “whole” dog must be maintained or the integrity of the breed will be compromised.

Purebred dogs from a good hobby breeder have their merit and appeal for many people because for one, they can be relatively sure of some continuity with what traits they’ll have in their particular breed and they don‘t want any surprises. From a hobby breeder, they are usually puppies with a clean slate and no psychologically damaging past experiences. There is no guessing about who the parents are. For instance, one may want a Border Collie, specifically for herding sheep on their farm. Purebred dogs were all bred to perform some sort of job to benefit man and certain breeds are specifically better at some types of jobs or activities than others. There is a viable place for the many wonderful purebred dogs in this world. But only the best of the best should be bred by reputable breeders or we could lose the uniformity, and in essence or principle, the individual breeds. There is a double edged sword, however, which comes with maintaining homogeny in our breeds, in that the less diversity in the family tree, the more likely are the genetic defects. But that is for another chapter or maybe another book. We’ll see if I get to that.

There are a lot of unscrupulous “breeders” in this and other countries who are more interested in making money than improving the breed. They do not perform genetic health testing, which is costly and base their breeding program on whether they think their dogs are close enough to the breed standard. Most purebred dogs have a set of inherent, genetically passed health issues to which they are prone and which reputable breeders test and select against, ever striving to eradicate the unfortunate maladies from their breed. When a dog, for instance shows hip dysplasia, genetically caused blindness or many other defects, they exclude that dog from their breeding program. They study the pedigree of their dogs and look for healthy ancestors with good longevity. They show or work their dogs in whatever venue the dog was bred for. If the dog can do it’s job well, for instance a herding, protection or sheep guardian dog, it may be a valuable asset to their breeding program.

Reputable, hobby breeders are not in it for the money. This is not their occupation. They breed dogs because they are compelled to improve upon the last generation of their breed. They are passionate about being a part of the commitment to improving and advancing their breed. They make little, if any profit because, for one, showing is very costly. Genetic health testing and stud fees are expensive. Puppy vaccinations, worming, proper nutrition of the ****, raising the pups, and veterinary costs take up most, if not all of their profit. Expect to pay in the neighborhood of a thousand dollars for a fine, purebred companion dog. This can vary somewhat, depending on a lot of things like geographical area, popularity of the breed and more. Show prospects will cost more. Many times, breeders will negotiate a little bit because you might have just the perfect home for their pup and may impress them more than Mr. Jones, another prospective buyer. They want their pups to go to good homes.

Most all of the good breeders will have a sales contract. The contents may vary but one fairly universal requirement will be that you spay or neuter your pet dog. If this pup is not determined by the breeder to be a show prospect, you will need to supply proof that your puppy has been spayed or neutered. Reputable breeders do not promote the breeding of their puppies that have been determined to not be quite worthy of reproducing offspring. Be glad because there is no earthly reason to breed any dog that will not improve upon the last generation or contribute to the breed as a whole. There are far too many dogs as it is.

Reputable hobby breeders will always, for the life of the puppy be responsible for the puppies they produce. If, for some reason, it doesn’t work out for you, the breeder will take back the pup because she doesn’t want her puppies to wind up in some dank, lonely shelter. She will usually guarantee a replacement puppy, should any genetic malady manifest itself in your puppy. She will be there to answer questions and help you in any way she can. She will give you, usually two or three days or more to have your puppy examined by a veterinarian and will guarantee the pup of any communicable type diseases for that time frame.

When you buy from a disreputable breeder, usually, once the puppy is out of her hands, you’re on your own. She will not take back the pup and cares little about where it ends up, should you need to re-home the pup at anytime in the future.

Disreputable breeders have nothing to base their breeding intentions on besides their own, oft uniformed opinion of the dog’s conformation or working ability. Their criteria often does not go beyond the cuteness of their dog or the nice dog, Fluffy, two doors down who happens to be of the same breed, sometimes questionably so. They can certainly say that they have papers or are registered. That means pathetically little. There are plenty of dogs who are AKC registered and are poor breed specimens. As explained, anyone can breed their dogs and they can be registered as long as there is a record of generations past.

While “back yard” bred puppies may sometimes, on the face of it appear to be markedly less expensive than an honorable, reputable breeder‘s, veterinary or professional training costs to attempt to overcome poor health or temperament down the road may far exceed the original cost of a well bred puppy. These “back yard” type breeders are to be avoided at all costs. And often, surprisingly, unscrupulous breeders of poor specimens actually charge about the same or sometimes much more than do hobby breeders. When people support these uninformed, uncaring “breeders,” they contribute to the ruination of the particular breed as a whole. It is most irresponsible to buy from these newspaper or Internet advertising people, whose main interest is money or letting the children of the family experience the miracle of birth, and little do they care to what home their puppies go. I realize that many people are simply unaware of the consequences or the big picture of what they’re doing when they buy a puppy from any but the most reputable breeders. My unwavering hope is that, as dogs seem to be gaining even more popularity, that people will educate themselves before making the decision to get a dog.

If you are desirous of a purebred dog, it is in your best interest, as well as the well being of the breed of your choice, to do your research. Reputable breeders will scrutinize you too. They will not sell a puppy to just anyone who comes along. They will ask you questions and in many cases, do a home check. They may ask for references from neighbors or your vet. Reputable breeders do not advertise in newspapers or on the Internet. They don’t stand in front of the grocery store or drop off their beloved puppies at pet or feed stores to be sold like an accessory or piece of equipment. They value their puppies as vital, family members, cherish them highly and are very careful who gets their puppies.

There are some beautiful websites that breeders put on the Internet. They can be very deceiving. Anyone can make a website and if you utilize this tool for your search, follow through with proof of their claims and get solid references. There are also some fine breeders who have websites.




Written by Carrie

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Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:18 PM. Reason: Dober asked me to :)
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Old 05-04-2007, 06:07 PM
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Another way to track down a good breeder is to go to a working or sporting dog trial, if a dog from the working or sporting group is what you’re looking for, or go to a dog show. There are also specialty shows where only one breed is competing. When a few names of breeders keep popping up in a favorable light, as you converse with owners of the breed (s) you‘re interested in, you can be quite confident that they have a good reputation. Word of mouth is a powerful tool. Just be sensitive that you do not attempt to speak with owners who are just about to go into the show ring. Find out when it would be a good time to chat. Visiting with dogs of various breeds and their owners is a great way to get more of a feeling for the breeds you may have in mind. Remember though, that these dogs have had training and when you get your puppy, he will not automatically display the good manners and obedience that you will likely observe in these dogs.

When you speak to a few breeders, even if they don’t currently have puppies, they can lead you to someone of whom they think highly who might, or someone who knows someone else. This is a good place to start and you’ll be hot on the trail.

Good breeders have perhaps one or two litters a year, if that. They are not churning out puppies like loaves of bread in a bakery. They are also not breeding more than one or two breeds.

One back yard breeder I had the misfortune to know, had Poodles of all sizes, Chihuahuas, Yorkshire Terriers and I think, something else. How can anyone maximize the quality of their breeding efforts, not to mention their animals’ care with such a diverse number of breeds? She called the extremely small Chihuahuas and Yorkies, “tea-cup.” This is a glaring, neon “red flag.” There is no such thing as a tea-cup anything unless it‘s your Grandmother’s Wedgwood china. Poodles come in Standard, Miniature and Toy. Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers are not classified by size. In other words, a Chihuahua is a Chihuahua is a Chihuahua. Their breed standard for weight is from two to six pounds. There is no miniature or toy, just Chihuahua. No reputable breeder will label or describe her dogs as “tea-cup.” Heaven knows, Chihuahuas are already miniature by default.

While we’re on the subject of “red flags,” no reputable breeder will allow her puppies to leave their litter mates before the age of eight weeks. Some will keep them until they’re ten weeks or a little longer. Any younger than eight weeks to leave the nest can result in a puppy who lacks the social skills learned by his litter mates as well as his mother and will have a difficult time developing properly. Do not accept a puppy under the age of eight weeks. Many back yard breeders or puppy mills either don’t care or don’t know any better. They just want one thing. Money, the experience of birth and to be rid of the responsibility of those first weeks of raising their puppies. (OK, three things.)

Do your research on the pedigrees of the litter or upcoming litter. There is a lot of information on the web to find out what to look for and what is significant. You will spend some time talking on the telephone or emailing different breeders. It is nice when you can find someone good in your area, but this is not always the case. Often it requires some travel.

Reputable hobby breeders don’t commonly have both parents on the premises and you may only be able to see the **** unless you travel. They search high and low for the best stud dog for their bitch and often that dog may be on the other side of the country or even in another country. They don’t choose their stud dogs because their next door neighbors happen to own Rover, who is such a “cute dog.” No reputable breeder will allow her bitch or stud dog to breed with a substandard, “back yard” bred dog. They choose only the crème of the crop and the animals best suited to complement each others‘ traits. They research and plan intensively to find just the right mate for their dog or bitch. Every dog has some flaw, even though it may be minute. If a bitch is an inch taller than the standard, a stud dog may be found that is slightly on the short side so that some of the puppies have an increased probability of being the right size. They will analyze the fine nuances of temperament in accordance to the breed standard. A bitch may be ever so slightly shy, where shyness is a fault, but not worth throwing out of the breeding program because she may have many other extremely superior attributes; lovely conformation, good genetic health and healthy ancestors, very workable temperament, perfect gait for the breed, and more. The breeder may look for a stud dog who is particularly out-going, exuberant and that also has fabulous conformation and working ability, for instance to try an off set the slight shyness in the bitch. If a dog has poor temperament, it should not be bred. Reputable breeders will strive to improve the temperament in their lines.

No dog should be bred prior to two years of age. Many of the genetic defects don’t show up until then and therefore can not be tested with any accuracy and until sufficiently developed, one can not be assured of correct conformation until mature or nearly so.

“Back yard” breeders don‘t research and analyze the detail of the numerous facets which make breeding dogs a science, as it should be. Most of these people are completely clueless to any of that and are often uneducated about the history of their own breed!

When you think you’ve found a fine breeder, be prepared with your list of questions. You should have already researched the genetic defects or diseases inherent in your breed of choice and know what questions to ask. This breeder should have proof of the health tests and results. These are not mere veterinary check ups which confirm that the dog is of good general health. These are specific tests on maladies, such as Von Willebran’s disease, a genetic bleeding disorder which is detected by DNA testing and hip and elbow scores relating to dysphasia, via x-rays and certified through OFA or like organizations. Research your breed and the health issues to which it is prone. Ask the breeder what were the ages of her dogs’ ancestors, when they died and from what did they die. How prevalent has cancer been in her dogs, if cancer is a disease to which her breed is particularly predisposed? A reputable breeder not only selects for physical soundness and other attributes, but strives to attain superior temperament for the breed. She should be willing to speak candidly of the drawbacks of the breed as well as the attributes. She should show a great deal of knowledge about her breed. Ask for references; buyers of puppies from previous litters and her veterinarian.


Written by Carrie

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Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:19 PM. Reason: Dober asked me to :)
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Old 05-04-2007, 06:09 PM
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The breeder with whom you are speaking will likely ask you questions about your experience with dogs, what you plan to do with the puppy, whether or not you have a fenced yard, where you live, if you have other dogs or young children and more. She wants to know what kind of life her puppy will likely have because she cares so much about her puppies that she’s been raising or will have been
raising for several weeks. She also wants the match between new owner and puppy to be a good one, like an egg is to an omelet. She wants to make the individual puppy fit comfortably into your distinct way of life.

Normally, you do not choose your puppy from the litter when you go to a reputable breeder. Your breeder knows her puppies better than you do by the time they’re eight to ten weeks old. Depending on the particular breed, if you are a highly active person who enjoys hiking, jogging or camping, she will choose a puppy that is showing extra spunk, energy and stamina, a more athletic puppy. If you want a companion dog and are a little more sedentary, she’ll choose one of the more laid back puppies. If there’s a slightly skittish puppy, she won’t put it together with a family with young children because that combination has a good chance of producing a fear biter. She’ll find a home with perhaps an elderly couple who live a quieter life. She knows her puppies and will be the most adept at creating the perfect union.

You may be making a few visits to your breeder’s home to see the bitch and puppies, if there are puppies at this time. Make absolute certain that the puppies are raised inside the home where they get used to the comings and goings of people, become accustomed to the normal noises of a household; the vacuum cleaner, rattling of pots and pans, children, and all the other regular sights and sounds of family living. Puppies must have been handled regularly by adults as well as by gentle children. Puppies raised out in the garage or barn, in an isolated and non-stimulating environment during this critical period will be seriously mal-adjusted. The environment should be clean and neat, but not sterile. The puppies should look healthy, clean and vibrant and they should be outgoing and lively.

Make sure you like the temperament of the mother and the puppies. Shyness should be avoided. Ask if the puppies had a puppy temperament test. This is not the “end all” in predicting what they’ll be like as they mature, but it is somewhat of an indicator, nevertheless. And it shows that she is covering all bases to ensure the best probability of improving her breeding program.

Another thing about reputable breeders is that they do not purposely breed “pet quality” dogs. This is a gimmick of “back yard” breeders when they need an excuse for having nothing to show for their breeding stock. “Well, these are ‘pet quality’ and that is why I have no titles or certificates of merit of any kind.“ When questioned about the dogs’ odd, non-conforming shape or size, you may hear, “My puppies may not look exactly like a Chihuahua because I breed pet quality dogs.“ A reputable breeder always strives to improve the next generation, to make her dogs conform more closely to the breed standard in every way. She will be lucky if she gets one show quality pup out of a whole litter and luckier still to get a couple. The remaining pups will be sold as “pet” or “companion” dogs. This does not, by any means indicate substandard or flawed puppies. They may lack the tiniest nuance of a quality which makes a show dog. It may be something as small as their attitude not being quite flashy enough. Or it may be that the puppies just lack a certain something that can’t be easily pin pointed. One or two puppies might just have that extra good look to the bone density or just a tad better angle of the shoulder. These puppies are not apt to differ significantly. So, if you get a “pet quality” puppy from a fine and reputable breeder, you can be sure you’re getting an exceedingly nice puppy. Let your breeder know if you’re interested in a show or pet dog. She will do her best to make the determination of which puppy will likely fit the bill, although it can be difficult to judge when puppies are so young, as they change with maturity. Talk it over with her well ahead of time.

It is very common when researching a breeder that there are no puppies at this time and if there are, it is likely that most, if not all are spoken for. You may be put on a waiting list or she may give you contacts of other good breeders who may have puppies in the near future. Expect to wait and to do some honest to goodness trail blazing for your puppy. It may seem like quite an involved process and it is, but it is well worth your effort in the long and short run. When I decided that the Doberman Pinscher was the breed for me, I researched this breed for about a year and a half. Then I researched and looked for breeders for about a year. Once I narrowed it down, I was on a couple of waiting lists, sometimes through two litters, with repeatedly disappointing results. When I finally found my perfect someone, it turned out that she had a litter due in a few weeks and told me that provided there were enough puppies, I would get one. Things were looking up like the first daffodils of spring. The long awaited prize was the closest thing to a promise I had had in a long time. You can imagine how the excitement rose up in my chest, that anticipatory energy reaching near the boiling point. Whew! “Glad” is an understatement to describe how I felt when someone else cancelled their request, because as it turned out, there wouldn’t have been enough puppies, as one or two were born dead, as sadly happens sometimes. I finally got my lovely boy and I can tell you honestly, that I’ve never regretted for one second the work I put into the research and waiting. It even gave me more time to brush up on my education of behavior and training. Don’t let your impatience to get your puppy take over your logic. Rushing heatedly to get a puppy on an impulse can be the beginning of an unhappy and stress-filled experience.






Written by Carrie
copy written material

Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:19 PM.
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Old 05-04-2007, 06:09 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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The breeder with whom you are speaking will likely ask you questions about your experience with dogs, what you plan to do with the puppy, whether or not you have a fenced yard, where you live, if you have other dogs or young children and more. She wants to know what kind of life her puppy will likely have because she cares so much about her puppies that she’s been raising or will have been
raising for several weeks. She also wants the match between new owner and puppy to be a good one, like an egg is to an omelet. She wants to make the individual puppy fit comfortably into your distinct way of life.

Normally, you do not choose your puppy from the litter when you go to a reputable breeder. Your breeder knows her puppies better than you do by the time they’re eight to ten weeks old. Depending on the particular breed, if you are a highly active person who enjoys hiking, jogging or camping, she will choose a puppy that is showing extra spunk, energy and stamina, a more athletic puppy. If you want a companion dog and are a little more sedentary, she’ll choose one of the more laid back puppies. If there’s a slightly skittish puppy, she won’t put it together with a family with young children because that combination has a good chance of producing a fear biter. She’ll find a home with perhaps an elderly couple who live a quieter life. She knows her puppies and will be the most adept at creating the perfect union.

You may be making a few visits to your breeder’s home to see the bitch and puppies, if there are puppies at this time. Make absolute certain that the puppies are raised inside the home where they get used to the comings and goings of people, become accustomed to the normal noises of a household; the vacuum cleaner, rattling of pots and pans, children, and all the other regular sights and sounds of family living. Puppies must have been handled regularly by adults as well as by gentle children. Puppies raised out in the garage or barn, in an isolated and non-stimulating environment during this critical period will be seriously mal-adjusted. The environment should be clean and neat, but not sterile. The puppies should look healthy, clean and vibrant and they should be outgoing and lively.

Make sure you like the temperament of the mother and the puppies. Shyness should be avoided. Ask if the puppies had a puppy temperament test. This is not the “end all” in predicting what they’ll be like as they mature, but it is somewhat of an indicator, nevertheless. And it shows that she is covering all bases to ensure the best probability of improving her breeding program.

Another thing about reputable breeders is that they do not purposely breed “pet quality” dogs. This is a gimmick of “back yard” breeders when they need an excuse for having nothing to show for their breeding stock. “Well, these are ‘pet quality’ and that is why I have no titles or certificates of merit of any kind.“ When questioned about the dogs’ odd, non-conforming shape or size, you may hear, “My puppies may not look exactly like a Chihuahua because I breed pet quality dogs.“ A reputable breeder always strives to improve the next generation, to make her dogs conform more closely to the breed standard in every way. She will be lucky if she gets one show quality pup out of a whole litter and luckier still to get a couple. The remaining pups will be sold as “pet” or “companion” dogs. This does not, by any means indicate substandard or flawed puppies. They may lack the tiniest nuance of a quality which makes a show dog. It may be something as small as their attitude not being quite flashy enough. Or it may be that the puppies just lack a certain something that can’t be easily pin pointed. One or two puppies might just have that extra good look to the bone density or just a tad better angle of the shoulder. These puppies are not apt to differ significantly. So, if you get a “pet quality” puppy from a fine and reputable breeder, you can be sure you’re getting an exceedingly nice puppy. Let your breeder know if you’re interested in a show or pet dog. She will do her best to make the determination of which puppy will likely fit the bill, although it can be difficult to judge when puppies are so young, as they change with maturity. Talk it over with her well ahead of time.

It is very common when researching a breeder that there are no puppies at this time and if there are, it is likely that most, if not all are spoken for. You may be put on a waiting list or she may give you contacts of other good breeders who may have puppies in the near future. Expect to wait and to do some honest to goodness trail blazing for your puppy. It may seem like quite an involved process and it is, but it is well worth your effort in the long and short run. When I decided that the Doberman Pinscher was the breed for me, I researched this breed for about a year and a half. Then I researched and looked for breeders for about a year. Once I narrowed it down, I was on a couple of waiting lists, sometimes through two litters, with repeatedly disappointing results. When I finally found my perfect someone, it turned out that she had a litter due in a few weeks and told me that provided there were enough puppies, I would get one. Things were looking up like the first daffodils of spring. The long awaited prize was the closest thing to a promise I had had in a long time. You can imagine how the excitement rose up in my chest, that anticipatory energy reaching near the boiling point. Whew! “Glad” is an understatement to describe how I felt when someone else cancelled their request, because as it turned out, there wouldn’t have been enough puppies, as one or two were born dead, as sadly happens sometimes. I finally got my lovely boy and I can tell you honestly, that I’ve never regretted for one second the work I put into the research and waiting. It even gave me more time to brush up on my education of behavior and training. Don’t let your impatience to get your puppy take over your logic. Rushing heatedly to get a puppy on an impulse can be the beginning of an unhappy and stress-filled experience.


Written by Carrie
copy written material

Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 05-04-2007, 06:19 PM
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A New Breed in Breeders

There’s a new “breed” in town and in fact, more than one. You’ve surely heard of “designer breeds;“ Labradoodles, Goldendoodles, Doberdoodles, Cockapoos, (they’ve been around for a while) Yorkipoos, and many more such mixes with contrived names. This sub-species of back yard breeders put two separate breeds together, not all with Poodles, which accounts for the “poo,” but many other breeds as well. They are “glorified” back yard breeders. They’re not even breeding purebred dogs, but the misinformed buyers think they’re getting a unique and special breed when they’re simply buying into the latest fad in canine culture. These are mutts, not a fixed type. They do not come out all looking the same. Creating a new breed involves considerably more science than most of these so called breeders ever dreamed about. Throwing two different breeds together, coming up with a clever name which is derived from parts of each, and charging a whole lot of money seems to be the new craze in this country and people are buying into it! There are few of these breeders who are genuinely striving to create a fixed breed where the offspring are becoming relatively homogenous. I believe there’s someone in Australia who is doing a good job with Labradoodles. But do we really need more breeds? That is a controversy, considering we have at our disposal 155 American Kennel Club registered breeds and still more accepted by other kennel Clubs, something like over four hundred distinct breeds. The majority of these “designer” breeders are producing nothing more than a gimmick to rake in the money with little care to the arduous consideration that reputable hobby breeders give when striving to maintain uniformity and health in purebred dogs. I believe that some of these back yard breeders do not all have ill intentions and are not all doing it for the sole purpose of making money. Nevertheless, they are ignorant and irresponsible about the ramifications of their actions. There is already a pathetically staggering number of mixed breed dogs, including Yorkiepoos, Maltipoos and all the rest of the untested, mixed breed gimmicks without homes. Yet more litters of puppies are tumbling out, one after another, all over the world. For the homes found for these dogs, there goes five, ten, fifteen, twenty, a thousand more slots, more potential homes for shelter dogs still in waiting or lying on a stainless steel table looking at the needle with the pink fluid about to enter their veins.



Beware of Puppy Mills

We talked about reputable hobby breeders, “back yard” breeders, including breeders of “designer dogs.” There is yet another type of "breeder," a set of despicable people who call themselves breeders, but are nothing more than puppy millers, the lowest of the low, where they turn out hundreds and sometimes thousands of puppies at a time and their bitches are nothing more to them than puppy - producing machines. These scum of the earth should be avoided like the plague.

Naturally and with certainty, most people have deep sympathy for the puppies thus produced and want to rescue one from the horrific conditions in which they are raised or where they reside presently, often in pet stores or other broker owned businesses. But, supporting these mills by purchasing these puppies, only enables them to continue turning out puppies like a conveyer belt turns out car parts. Every genuine dog lover who is aware of these immoral and unscrupulous dog dealers should get the word out to the public just what the unknowing, general puppy- buying population is doing when they buy from a pet store or other brokerage entity.

Puppy mills are often, but not always on some out-of-the-way acreage in someone’s old barn or garage. There will be stacks upon stacks of small, wire cages lining every wall, rooms and rooms filled to the brim, where the mothers have their puppies and where they stay until they are of no further use. In many mills, cages are rarely cleaned and the dogs lie in their own feces and are covered in urine. Their water, if they have water is filthy. They are not socialized to humans and often diseased with internal parasites and viruses. Their environment is devoid of external stimulation, so vital to every living being’s ability to thrive. There will be dead puppies left for an unspecified amount of time before they are noticed. The live puppies are the pathetic, destitute little creatures who find their way to pet or feed stores, most taken from their mothers as early as four weeks of age, far too young. Most people with even half a heart see these puppies in glass cages in malls or pet stores and feel an irresistible compulsion to rescue them from being alone and want to give them a loving home. They are indeed hard to turn away from. However, by purchasing these particular puppies, vastly more harm than good is done because as long as the money keeps flowing like a geiser, this horrific practice is able to continue and flourish. The authorities sometimes step in when extreme abuse and neglect, such as my example is found. The problem is, that these places are all over the country and only a fraction of them are ever discovered. And some of them are not considered by the authorities to be abusive enough! Apparently, there is tolerance for moderate neglect and mistreatment of animals and is acceptable in our society. I hope for all the world that this sick and skewed mentality changes.

Shelters and Purebred Rescue Organizations

Some prospective dog owners, thankfully, have a strong desire to adopt a needy dog from a shelter or rescue, to save just one more animal from death or a life worse than death. It’s a wonderful and admirable way to go and Heaven knows, these dogs need a loving home so badly. Some of these hapless animals sit and languish alone, in shelters with cold, concrete stalls for a very long time, with little attention until they are either finally adopted or euthanized. Most shelters are run by donations, workers are volunteers and there is little money or time to spend one on one with these dogs, however hard they try, bless their hearts. There are millions and millions of homeless dogs in this and other countries with little hope of being adopted.

In a shelter, there will be puppies as well as adult dogs, purebreds and mixed breeds alike. Many will have behavior problems, which range in severity, as that is the biggest reason people give up on their dogs. If you are not very familiar with training and working through perplexing canine behavior, it’s a good idea to research and get the help of a trainer if the dog that you plan to adopt has serious behavioral issues. The most severely aggressive dogs are usually euthanized and not adoptable. There are also many that do not have seriously abnormal behavior. There are a vast number of reasons why people give up their dogs and not all of them have been mistreated or neglected. It is important to know ahead of time what your requirements are and what your expertise is.

Think about your life style and what type of dog will suit you best. If you’re not equipped to raise a puppy for one reason or another, often an adult dog will make life easier on you. Puppies are difficult to raise, with their very normal behavior of; destructive chewing, nipping, jumping and lack of bladder control. They require so much more supervision and work than most adult dogs. However an adult dog who has had no training will still require considerable effort on your part.


Written by Carrie
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Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 05-04-2007, 06:23 PM
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With a mixed breed dog, you may or may not be able to guess what his parentage is. If the shelter workers have a good idea, that may help you in your decision. Once you learn the tendencies or traits in various breeds and what they were bred for, you have a little something to go on to determine what a particular puppy might be like. However, without knowing the parents, it is much more of a crap shoot as to the future temperament and physical traits of a puppy you’re considering than it is with a purebred dog. Various breed groups will be discussed in another chapter. The shelter volunteers will have worked a little with some of the dogs and will have them evaluated before adoption. Some shelters are better than others at being thorough and conscientious about disclosing known, pertinent information about a dog. Some adult dogs will know some basic obedience, have fairly good or very good house manners and be house broken. These are very potentially a few nice features about adopting an adult dog. On the other hand, you might bring home a sweet, friendly dog who seemingly has all you could ever want in a dog. After his first walk, you discover he’s terrified of men with beards. You’ll need to address that. In other words, you don’t know what life experiences an adopted dog had and some fearful issues may linger which will need to be worked through. Some emotional problems have a good prognosis for remedy. You may opt to enlist the services of a good behaviorist to work through any “bugs” that your adopted dog might have. Or you may be able to rectify them yourself. But many shelter dogs are just lonely and need guidance and with good husbandry, they most commonly turn out to be wonderful, lifetime companions.

Purebred rescue organizations take in unwanted purebred dogs and sometimes mixes. They, like other shelters operate on the kindness of caring citizens and individual breed clubs. Remember when I mentioned about shoddy, “back yard” breeders who, along with other disreputable practices, rarely take back their puppies when they don’t “work out” for their owners? And often they don’t work out because of poor temperaments and improper socialization during the critical first weeks. Perhaps some are plagued with joint or bone maladies from poor breeding and the veterinary costs of repair are too much for the previous and unverified purchasers. This is where many of those purebred dogs end up. There are also a significant number that do not have any problems, many that were given up due to the death of their loving owner or due to relocation. Many adopters who are financially able, choose a dog in order to give it the medical or behavioral care it needs to live out the rest of his life comfortably. There are some amazing people in this world who have what it takes to make a difference.

If you’re looking for specific traits in a dog, but want to adopt, a purebred rescue is a very viable option. Incidentally, I know of some much loved Dobermans, for example, who were rescues and went onto winning titles in some of the dog sports and obedience trials. Lucky dogs!

The adoption fees will be substantially less than purchasing from a breeder. Expect to have someone from the rescue do a home check, ask for references and with many, require a fenced yard. They may want to make sure you are financially able to give the dog all the care he deserves. Shelters and purebred rescues want to make relatively sure that this, your home, will be the loving, forever home for a deserving dog who has already had a rough start in life.

Dogs are quite adaptable to a new home and your adopted dog will bond with you before long, like being in the same boat out at sea. Dogs’ needs are few really, but they do need to know that they have a trustworthy and loving leader. It is amazing, but not altogether surprising how homeless dogs, once adopted into a caring home, show a phenomenal sense of gratefulness. There is just something about these animals and I’ve also heard it from people time and again, how loving, affectionate and willing these dogs can be. It’s as if they know that their adoptive families saved them from a life of misery. It is an immense pleasure to know that more and more people are opting for adopting. (Pardon the silly rhyme. I get a little silly when I‘m feeling giddy.)

Deciding to get a puppy or an adult dog is an enormous responsibility. It should be a life long commitment. Sadly, for many dogs, it is not. People give up on their furry friends, often for behavioral issues that they themselves caused by not educating themselves or enlisting the help of a trainer or behaviorist. Dogs are not pieces of equipment or old clothes that you dump off at a local charity when you’re through with them. Dogs are living, feeling, thinking animals who have a rich set of emotions. They are at our mercy, completely dependent on humans for their survival. Dogs should be brought into the family with the commitment that they are here to stay, like any other family member. I realize that there are certain situations where keeping a dog that puts children or adults in extreme danger is no longer a possibility. But there are people who dump their dogs for fantastically frivolous reasons, like the puppy grew into an adult and isn’t “cute” anymore. Or, “Now we’re having a baby and there’s no time for a dog.“ Hopefully, in most cases, these situations can be avoided with education, planning, and a learned sense of duty where none formerly existed.

If getting a dog is what you‘ve always dreamed of, be sure you have the desire to have your dog be an integral part of the family, to be brought into the home and not delegated to the back yard or garage. Dogs are hardwired to live with their people and do not do well left alone for excessive amounts of time.

Generally, barring any medical reasons, all pet dogs should be spayed and neutered. There are infinitely more than enough dogs in this world. Breeding should be left up to the knowledgeable, responsible breeders who breed only the most superior specimens.

I know, that reading this book is a good indicator that you are in the realm of society which takes dog ownership to heart and has an inherent sense of duty to become informed about a living creature whose life depends on you to provide for all of his needs. And for that, I am glad. When I think about all the abuse and neglect to which so many helpless dogs succumb, all the unwanted dogs with barely a life at all, an unrelenting anxiety haunts me. These precious gifts, these wonderful creatures…Why are there so many people still, who get puppies before they think, before they do even rudimentary inquiry or planning? Where is the imagination or insight, the empathy and the heart of man?


Written by Carrie
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Last edited by Renee750il; 05-04-2007 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 05-04-2007, 07:35 PM
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Well put , but to me the best way to find a good breeder is through a breed club . Even though I didn't show my dogs , I was known for my testing and care of the pups and was recommended .
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Old 05-04-2007, 07:44 PM
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When will your book be done?............. I want one.........The Whole Thing! Lol
Please let me know.

Julie.
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Old 05-04-2007, 08:01 PM
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ditto Julie!!
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Old 05-04-2007, 08:40 PM
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Thank you Julie and Brattina. That's very kind. I noticed that I spelled dam like ****. (that thing that holds water back) LOL. I fixed it in my real thing. There will be severe editing needed, as I am a lousy speller and my Microsoft Works thingy doesn't do a very good job. Anyhow, that's a very rough draft. I have less than half of it finished in the rough and I've been working on it for months. So, it's hard to say when it will be finished.....maybe at least a year.

But my main reason for posting that was that there are so many people that come on the forum who consider breeding their pet dogs and we try to explain why that's not a good idea. And they still don't understand that they are contributing to the problem. Secondly, I want people to find out things before they buy a puppy or at least before they buy another puppy. My book is going to be about many different aspects of dogs. It's probably going to be a very large book, a bigger project than I had formerly considered. So, who knows how long it will take? I may well die of old age before I finish it. LOL.

But I appreciate your kind responses. I would love to know if it reads too boringly or "dry," as they say. It's hard to get out the information I want to spit out, while making it entertaining at the same time. I fear that some parts of it may be too hum drum. LOL. That will be part of my editing or going through everything again and again.
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