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  #61  
Old 10-08-2010, 09:18 AM
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el_pic el_pic is offline
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Rewards + supervision + crate is the key.

But what about Puppy training pads ???

and moving the self stick kind to the outdoors ???
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  #62  
Old 10-08-2010, 11:24 PM
DogTrainerTim DogTrainerTim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShopieCha View Post

Many experts advise if biting is getting out of hand to Bite Back! As funny as it sounds it works and the dog understands that biting hurts.
Yep - not a good idea. I've been dog training for several years and NEVER known this to be seriously put forward as a way to stop puppy or dog biting. There are so many other ways to train a dog, reward- or praise-based wherever possible, without resorting to this sort of thing. Remember too, you're not the dog. You're the respected (and respectful) master/mistress and you don't get that respect by biting!
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  #63  
Old 12-01-2010, 03:32 AM
Dog1 Dog1 is offline
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Hello there!

Its a common issue with puppies...
they may obtain bad habbits and tendancies on there own...

i recomend you read these articles for better understanding:

Aggressive Dog Training | Dog training avenue
Dog Clicker Training | Dog training avenue
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  #64  
Old 12-22-2010, 04:32 PM
Ninadee Ninadee is offline
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I am trying to housebreak my puppy exactly the way you explained. She's 6 months old, I just rescued her from the humane society. She hates the crate. And now she seems to hate me. She runs from me whenever I walk near her because she doesn't want to go in her crate.
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  #65  
Old 12-22-2010, 04:49 PM
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Renee750il Renee750il is offline
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Your problem may be that she's identifying the crate with being at the shelter. You probably need to help her learn that her crate is a place where she's safe and can relax, and that will take time.

In the meantime, work on the housetraining by keeping her leashed to you and taking her out at frequent intervals and when she does eliminate outside, make it worth her while with whatever treats and lavish praise she likes best.
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  #66  
Old 12-23-2010, 03:42 PM
mypetiswoody mypetiswoody is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DogTrainerTim View Post
There are so many other ways to train a dog, reward- or praise-based wherever possible, without resorting to this sort of thing.
I absolutely agree. We should train dogs by positive reinforcement. It's much better for dogs to relate to doing things because of rewards than not doing things because of pain.

There are just so many things wrong with negative reinforcement. Cruelty is definitely on top of the list. Also, dogs live "by the moment" - typically by the time that we punish them, they won't relate the punishment to what they've done wrong, so punishment often does not achieve our goals.

What I advise dog owners is patience, patience, patience. Every dog is different and learn at a different pace.
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  #67  
Old 02-19-2011, 04:43 PM
Athelas Athelas is offline
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Hi everyone,

I know there are a million posts on this (with some people disagreeing on best/worst practices), but I thought I would add my own two cents!

I come at the question from a combination of biology and psychology: there are certain things an animal does without learning (i.e. instinct, although these can often be modified by learning) and there are some that absolutely must be learned.

In my experience, dogs CAN learn from both negative and positive reinforcement, but the question is WHAT do they learn from those reinforcements? This is why I think people will have little success with negative reinforcement (i.e. scolding, isolating, etc.) because the puppy/dog learns that master/mistress is mad when it pees (not necessarily making the connection that it is the peeing in the house that makes us mad!).

On the other hand, I have found that dogs learn quickly - very quickly - when praise is used as the reinforcer. Even better than food! And why not? Dogs have been bred for thousands of generations to like praise from humans more than anything else. Puppies that were obedient, loyal, affectionate to the master were bred, those who were aloof and not affectionate were not.

What I have had great success with is biding my time - waiting for the puppy/dog to do what it is I want them to do -- and then PRAISE them like it is the fourth of July! When it comes to housetraining, this means catching them in the act (of peeing inside) and rather than yelling at them, just quietly picking them up, taking them outside (or to the wee-wee pad, depending on your setup) and then making that place a happy place to be. I also bring them there periodically - biding my time until we get a pee or poop in the right place and then again PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE.

The puppy/dog quickly makes the association: oh, if I pee/poop here, master/mistress gets very happy. hmm .. I think I will save my pee so that I can come here and do this again! And when you reward him/her every time with praise, that is exactly what the dog will do.

Scott

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  #68  
Old 09-22-2011, 04:29 PM
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Dekka Dekka is offline
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This thread seems to get more spam....
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  #69  
Old 11-11-2011, 06:20 PM
WookieePups WookieePups is offline
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I agree with many of the other folks in terms of utilizing consistency, persistence, patience, supervision and rewards when it comes to training your dog. I'm a firm believer of positive reinforcement, which is why I give my dog (Dre) tons of praise for a job well done. Be sure that you are consistent in doing this and that you do not praise him when he does not follow your command/lesson. otherwise the poor thing will just be confused. Also, a treat here and there can also help to entice your pooch to learn as well as to help boost his confidence and ability to learn.

As for not yelling.. try your hardest NOt to yell. Remember that a dog's ears are definitely more sensitive than ours. Also, a lot of the time, dogs recognize tone and pitch prior to recognizing words... When showing your dog that you aren't happy, try using a firm tone with a relatively even pitch without increasing your volume..

I hope this makes sense.. good luck!!
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  #70  
Old 03-26-2012, 08:59 PM
Chrissy49 Chrissy49 is offline
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i own a half poodle and half schnozzer bichon he is 3 yrs old and got neutred a week ago and we take him out on a scedule but still has pee accidents in the house i have my living room and kitchen blocked off with a fence but he has gone near the bathroom on the floor and in my sons room twice now . not sure why he keeps doing his duty in the house when we take him out a few times a day every day . he is crate trained and goes in it at nite and never has an acciddent in his crate. should we be doing something else to stop his behavoir ? not sure if its peeing or him marking his terroritory he has been fixed like i said i thought they stopped marking after surgery hmm . this is the first time we owned a male dog and a small dog also always owned female dogs and bigger ones . any help will be greatly apperciated thanks
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