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  #11  
Old 01-15-2007, 07:13 PM
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colliewog colliewog is offline
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Originally Posted by Paige View Post
colliewog I have a pet rat. My sheltie use to walk around with the rat on her back, would share her food with her, and cuddled with her. They were the best of friends after Lou's two rat buddies died of old age. That dog always loved my rodents.
I loved my rats. My last rat was a hairless rat who died of breast cancer 4 yrs ago. I was so devastated that I haven't gotten another one since. People didn't understand how I could pay $300.00 for surgery to remove a mammary tumor on a $2.00 rat. But I did and it gave her another year, but when the tumors returned, then came with a vengence and we had to put her down.
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  #12  
Old 01-15-2007, 07:15 PM
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Love That Collie Love That Collie is offline
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roughcollies, while I agree with some of what you say whether a breeder of many years or not or owning lots of Collies or knowing a someone who breeds collies. All I can say is that you must have had lines of Collies that were unintelligent because of poor breeding, I don't know. But I've never, ever had a "ditzy" collie. And head shape and size has nothing to do with intelligence or lack thereof. Walking into walls and not knowing how to step over something in its path or being uncoordinated sounds more like a health defect or genetic trait.

PAIGE - if you do decide on a Collie, please do your research on the breeder that you choose. I'm sure you already know that just because someone breeds collies or any dog for that matter doesn't make them a good breeder.
I know of several collie breeders who breed merle to merle and that is a big NO NO in ETHICAL collie breeding.
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  #13  
Old 01-16-2007, 12:26 PM
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Denaluvscorgis Denaluvscorgis is offline
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I was raised with Collies when I still lived at home with my parents. They're truly lovely dogs!!!!
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2007, 06:20 PM
DeeDee DeeDee is offline
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Default surprise-- it's a collie!!

oh boy, well, this is funny and not so funny really. I adopted a dog from pound over the weekend, met with her twice, and the card listed her as a terrier mix. I thought she looked different from other terrier type dogs, but thought the pound must know. I got her home and as a little time more went by, and I could see her from different angles, and her behavior, I realized almost certainly she is part or nearly all collie- maybe a collie and small dog mix, or sheltie and other dog mix.
At the pound she was scared, quiet as a mouse and a bit aloof. I took her for a couple walks with a volunteer helper, and she seemed a bit independent. The next day she seemed to recognize me and we spent over 2 hours in a play area. She was less aloof and started to show some affection, and as I ran in a circle she followed at my heels kind of moving me along, but they insisted she was a terrier.
Anyways, since then I've realized (vet will know more about this than me, we go Thursday), this dog totally acts like a collie from the little I know of them. She is super vigilant and notices any sound and her ears go forward, she loves the outdoors more than your average terrier would, and she is smarter than I realized. My daughter taught her a trick in only 2 tries, she mimicked what my daughter did lying down on her side. Every time after she would continue to play the lying on side game, hard to explain, but I thought (of course) very smart.
The not so funny part about the pound telling us she was t errier when apparently she is a small collie is she is super active, would love to run around a farm all day, and also barks alot- a high pitched sound. She is veyr loyal to US, but only us. At the gas station she did an impersonation of a doberman watch dog, when a nice man pumped our gas. It was so embarrasing, she was having a snarling barking fit, just like seriously dobies do that are used as watch dogs. Then, after she sat down and almost looked content as if she thought she had done her job.
THe thing that concerns me most is the barking but esp the vicious guard dog impersonation. The actgive part is manageable, I will just lose 20 pounds running her everyday, but I want to be able to take her out in society without her thinking she is a guard dog for us.
collie owners, what do you think, keeping in mind she is a rescue? I got some good tips for keeping her occupied when I leave the house during the day, to curtail barking, but since I posted that, we stopped for gas, and realized she thinks she is part dobie.
help..
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  #15  
Old 01-16-2007, 06:38 PM
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Love That Collie Love That Collie is offline
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Post a good picture of her and some of us here might be able to help.

Since she is a mix, even if she is part Collie then whatever she's mixed with could be the part that is snarling at the gas station attendant so to speak.

I have never had a Collie snarl and growl at someone. I had one collie who was 12 when he died and he had NEVER uttered one growl in his entire life, ever.

Collies normally, as adults, aren't as active as what you described.
However, she could be part Sheltie. A lot of Shelties are VERY active and nippy as adults and are in no way as calm as a Collie. I have never had a Collie that didn't want everyone to pet it stranger or friend. Collies are usually not very territorial as you described meaning that yours apparently didn't like it one bit having the guy that close to your car as you said "vicious guard dog."

Do you know her background? Was she abused physically? If she was abused then that could be the reason for the bad behavior. About how much does she weigh? Yes, Collies AND Shelties can be barkers. Bailey is a barker but only because he wants attention from WHATEVER he's barking at. Chloe could care less about barking. LOL

Again, a picture would be more than helpful.
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  #16  
Old 01-16-2007, 06:40 PM
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colliewog colliewog is offline
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She could easily be a mix of several breeds. A pic would help a lot.

Some Collies can be aloof with strangers, especially is not socialized properly as a puppy (which wouldn't be uncommon with a shelter dog), but typically they are friendly with friendly people. However, my dogs are very protective of their property, especially their yard and my front door. You would think I had a house full of vicious attack dogs when you ring the doorbell. I don't discourage the behavior, as I think it would discourage a burglar. It is very controlled, though, and with a simple "enough" command, they are silenced. This isn't a Collie trait per se. Many breeds protect their property with the zest that you describe. She may be going overboard because everything is new and she doesn't know what to expect from strangers. What do you do when she does this? Part of her response may be directly related to how you respond.
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~Smooth Collies~

URO1 CH "Smidgen" RA,WW-RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)
URO2 CH "Dora" RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)

~American Hairless Terriers (coated)~
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "OE" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "Spud" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
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  #17  
Old 01-16-2007, 07:00 PM
DeeDee DeeDee is offline
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I dont know how to post a picture of her, but will see if a friend can for me. In answer to how I responded when she went to guard dog mode, first I was surprised, I never saw her become like that, and the man was nice, smiling, just pumping our gas and wiping the windows down. So, for a few seconds I didnt do anything bc I was just stunned, then I said firmly, loudly, her name and NO!, she did not seem to take notice of me, she was in her own barking world at that point. Only after the man left, she transformed into cute collie, sat there smiling, and really seemed content as if she had performed a necessary task for us. She is the size about of a sheltie, her fur is exactly like Lassie, and her tail is like that too, but she has something else mixed in. Besides telling her no, what else would be good to stop her in her tracks?
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  #18  
Old 01-16-2007, 07:40 PM
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Love That Collie Love That Collie is offline
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Since I only have to deal with Bailey at this point and if Chloe (age 6 months) does bark I can silence her with saying "enough" and at the same time using my index and middle finger pressed together and a quick jesture horizontally in front of myself (kinda hard to explain in writing) it's a form of sign language lol and she immediately stops.

Bailey on the otherhand can sometimes "zone out" in his "bark world". When he initially barks when someone comes to the door I tell him OK, pat his head, put him in a "sit/stay" and the next time he barks I firmly say "enough" with the hand jesture ^^. He's still excited and he is a "talker" anyway and he'll usually resort to "talking" softly, which isn't a bark but he will try to contain himself but he's still young and puppylike at 21 months but I can see him maturing and getting better at controlling his excitibility.

When Bailey was a very young puppy 3-4 months he used to interrupt conversations with neighbors I was having if we were out on a walk. I tried the ignore technique, didn't work. "Enough" didn't work when out of the house on walks. So I squirted him ONCE with the squirt gun and he's never done it again during a conversation. (He hates water anywhere from the feet up) I don't like using the squirt gun but in that situation it did do the trick seeing that he was and can be very barky.

However, that being said, training away any unwanted behavior can take time. Consistency is the key. You have to be more strong willed than the dog.
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  #19  
Old 01-17-2007, 12:00 AM
MyLittleChowChow MyLittleChowChow is offline
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I'm sorry, I don't know a thing about Collies but with some mention of intellegents of the breed, I just wanted to share this with you.
My grandfather was a farmer. Up until my grandparent's died, there was a large picture of a Collie sitting on a step of my grandparents house. Not long ago I asked mom about that dog in the picture. She told me how (darn, now I cant think what her name was), anyway, one day a cow got out. Grandpa got mad and yelled at her for letting the cow get out. LOL, she got mad at him and REFUSED to work for a week. She said everyday for a week Grandpa would go outside, say come on, she'd just sit there, refusing to go. For a whole week this went on. All because he yelled at her about over the cow. I wish I would have known that dog, I like the sounds of her attitude.

Sorry, just thought I'd share this with you.
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  #20  
Old 01-17-2007, 07:25 AM
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Paige Paige is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colliewog View Post
I loved my rats. My last rat was a hairless rat who died of breast cancer 4 yrs ago. I was so devastated that I haven't gotten another one since. People didn't understand how I could pay $300.00 for surgery to remove a mammary tumor on a $2.00 rat. But I did and it gave her another year, but when the tumors returned, then came with a vengence and we had to put her down.
I'd do the same for Lou. She is the last of 14 rats I had. It was hard to tell them all apart because 13 of them were either brown or brown and white. Lou, being the only dumbo, was my favourite. I plan on getting her a new rat buddy. It's hard going from such a large number to only one. I miss them all.

As for what everyone else is saying, obviously health is something important and thank-you for being honest. If I do get a Collie I actually am hoping I can find one that will fit into my home through a collie rescue group that has foster homes in my area. As much as everyone loves a cute puppy, I enjoy the company of an adult dog just as much. So we'll see. That is years away. My borders are my perfect K-9 companions.
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