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  #11  
Old 01-04-2007, 02:46 PM
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Shevelle Shevelle is offline
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Oh my!! I just want to say thank you so much all of you that responded to my thread.. I want to thank you for taking the time out to explain to me that shes a puppy and a few GREAT tips in correcting this situations.. I will post back in a few days to let you know how all is going.. Thank you so much!!!
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  #12  
Old 01-04-2007, 03:07 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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How much exercise is she getting? How many different times during the day do you work on a few obedience skills? Why not take her outside and let her rip roar around the yard, take her on a little walk, come back and let her chase a ball some more....really poop her out. Bring her inside and work on a sit, a down, a come. Use a treat and lure her into position if needed. When she's tired, she'll be less apt (I would think) to get quite so wild. This way, when you stop and and she's calmer and you want to pat her gently and calmly, she may get more opportunitites to be reinforced for that nice behavior. Don't pat her or talk to her if she's biting and wild. If she's still a maniacal barracuda, take her outside again and run her around the yard some more.

So, exercise, alternative "chores" to do. Let's get this pup to see how a little serious work and cutting out some of the silliness gets her a big payoff.

When she's acting like a maniac, think to yourself. She needs something else to do. What can I ask her to do instead? If another chew toy isn't good enough, how about some training? A nice informal walk where she walks fairly close to you, getting a high value treat for nice walking. Do I need to let her get her zoomies out first? (because it's hard for a pup to think when they're all pent up with that high intensity energy)

Maybe that will help.
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  #13  
Old 01-04-2007, 03:20 PM
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Spiritus Spiritus is offline
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Here's one other thing to add. Keep her ON LEASH in the house. That way you always have something other than her to grab onto when she starts her "playing". And really, that is all this is - play, and she hasn't learned yet that it is unacceptable. You've received some excellent advice here, but I always like to stress how and versatile a tool the leash really is.
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  #14  
Old 01-04-2007, 04:01 PM
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Good idea Spiritus. That way you have a little control and you don't have to grab toward her neck, something that can cause problems later on. I agree...this is play, albeit rough play. They are little barracudas, aren't they. It just takes some time, good training and maturity.....and exercise! LOL.
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"If you love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." -- Samuel Adams 1776





"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

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  #15  
Old 01-05-2007, 11:19 AM
Baileybear Baileybear is offline
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Hi Shevelle,

It sounds like my husband & I are going through a similar situation with our 10 week old yellow lab pup. He's our first pet & we had no idea what we were getting ourselves into...we did plenty of research on food, toys, treats, training classes, etc. and we made sure that when we brought our puppy home he would have everything he needed to feel welcome, safe & happy in our house. However, we didn't do much research on our breeder or bite inhibition & thought that taking Bailey home at 6 weeks, 2 days would be perfectly fine! Boy, were we wrong! I think Bailey sees us as his littermates (of course, he responds a bit better to my husband) and he is constantly giving up his toys to come after us instead. I go to bed in tears every single night feeling as though we're losing the battle, but it will get better, right?

I think one of our problems with Bailey is that he isn't getting enough exercise. Because we brought him home so little, I've been very hesitant to take him on walks for fear he might pick up an illness before he's had his complete shots series. We are starting him with a trainer next week, and one thing she recommened was an extending leash (kind of looks like a big tape measure) if you don't have a fenced-in yard...that way the little pup can rip around the yard but you've still got them on your arm. I think we're going to try that...and then install a fence the second Spring rolls around!

Other things that Bailey loves to chew on (besides us) are a booda rope soaked in chicken broth & then frozen, Nylabone rack of ribs (must be supervised), and Kong stuffed with a little bit of peanut butter & then frozen. This gives him something to work at & get preoccupied with. Also, mental stimulation really helps! A Buster food cube with little treats or pieces of kibble inside...Bailey goes crazy while trying to figure out how to get the food out! We are just trying anything to redirect his attention, and hopefully as he gets a little older & his training classes start, his attention span will be a bit greater and we can work on understanding our alien relationship a bit better.

Hope this helps! Best of luck to you
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  #16  
Old 01-05-2007, 12:33 PM
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Love That Collie Love That Collie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shevelle View Post
This just seems like she is “unsettled”.. She runs around crazy and the the biting begins.. But its all the time.. She doesn’t run around all the time, but she does bite all the time. It seems like every time she bites we do exactly what has been explained in the thread.. We put a toy in her mouth.. Last
Im no way am I afraid of her.. Ive had extremely dangerous animals in my life time and a Shepard/Rottie is about the sweetest and smartest Ive had.. LOL!!
I have trained my other dogs in the past and they have gotten to the point that on command with one word they will respond.. It just seems with Bella Im not doing something right..
Shevelle, from your above post where you mention that you have trained all your other dogs in your life but Bella isn't doing what they did when they did it etc... and I believe that you obviously feel that you have failed. This isn't true, please don't let it get you down. Because, as I told you in your very first thread about this subject, I know where you are coming from.

I too had always trained ALL of my dogs from the time I was a kid and I have had many dogs throughout my life, including three Chows. And they presented no problem for me. However, when I got Bailey, I was so taken aback by his "herding" and his biting and when he didn't respond as quickly or how I wanted him to respond I became inwardly frustrated that this young puppy was getting the better of ME, that I had actually sat in the middle of the kitchen floor and cried! (while he was out of the room of course) I just could not believe that I could NOT get through to him NOT to bite me, bruise me and rip up the backs of my legs!! WHAT in the world was I doing wrong??? Or what in the H@!! was wrong with him?

I even hired one of those expensive trainers that come to your home which made me feel even more defeated to think that I couldn't train MY own dog as I had so, so many over 30 years!! BTW, in my case my money was wasted on the "30 year experienced dog trainer" the worst money I EVER spent!!

So, you know what happened? I thought about it long and hard and even considered sending him back to the breeder who was more than willing to do whatever I decided. When I thought long and hard, I decided that it was me who was trying to make Bailey into all those other pups/dogs in my life that I had trained so beautifully and had done exactly as I had said, that he was merely a CHALLENGE, the biggest challenge that a small puppy of mine had presented to me and more time was needed for ME to overcome MY challenge. When I stopped treating him like he was like all the other puppies I had had (because he was not) and not letting him get ANYTHING for free and sticking to my "guns" then things began to fall into place not to mention he started maturing. Bailey HAD a lot of stubborness and will, and he was/is so smart and I knew it, but my stubborness, will and smarts I decided had to be bigger than his. And it worked. And with time I realized that I wasn't a failure it was just that I hadn't been prepared for the challenge right off the bat! So, don't give up on Bella she will probably grow up to be the "softest mouthed" dog you ever owned! I know Bailey now is.
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  #17  
Old 01-05-2007, 12:42 PM
Herschel Herschel is offline
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I don't think you need a trainer. We used to call Herschel "the shark" because he would just open up his mouth and come after us. His teeth were (and still are) razor sharp so he could easily break skin. He didn't mean any harm, but he was something to be feared. On more than one occasion, he ran up and bit my girlfriend on the back of the ankles for no reason.

These are puppies! Baileybear and Shevelle, there is still hope. You will probably have days where you feel terrible, want to give up, and end up sitting in your kitchen crying.

You aren't doing anything wrong. It is just a phase. Be consistent with ignoring the behavior and you will be rewarded! Prevent your friends from "wrestling" your dogs or from any behavior the encourages nipping.
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  #18  
Old 01-05-2007, 12:44 PM
Herschel Herschel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baileybear View Post
Hi Shevelle,

It sounds like my husband & I are going through a similar situation with our 10 week old yellow lab pup. He's our first pet & we had no idea what we were getting ourselves into...we did plenty of research on food, toys, treats, training classes, etc. and we made sure that when we brought our puppy home he would have everything he needed to feel welcome, safe & happy in our house. However, we didn't do much research on our breeder or bite inhibition & thought that taking Bailey home at 6 weeks, 2 days would be perfectly fine! Boy, were we wrong! I think Bailey sees us as his littermates (of course, he responds a bit better to my husband) and he is constantly giving up his toys to come after us instead. I go to bed in tears every single night feeling as though we're losing the battle, but it will get better, right?

I think one of our problems with Bailey is that he isn't getting enough exercise. Because we brought him home so little, I've been very hesitant to take him on walks for fear he might pick up an illness before he's had his complete shots series. We are starting him with a trainer next week, and one thing she recommened was an extending leash (kind of looks like a big tape measure) if you don't have a fenced-in yard...that way the little pup can rip around the yard but you've still got them on your arm. I think we're going to try that...and then install a fence the second Spring rolls around!

Other things that Bailey loves to chew on (besides us) are a booda rope soaked in chicken broth & then frozen, Nylabone rack of ribs (must be supervised), and Kong stuffed with a little bit of peanut butter & then frozen. This gives him something to work at & get preoccupied with. Also, mental stimulation really helps! A Buster food cube with little treats or pieces of kibble inside...Bailey goes crazy while trying to figure out how to get the food out! We are just trying anything to redirect his attention, and hopefully as he gets a little older & his training classes start, his attention span will be a bit greater and we can work on understanding our alien relationship a bit better.

Hope this helps! Best of luck to you
I'm not a trainer, so don't take any advice that I give you as professional, please.

Retractable leashes encourage pulling and you might have problems later on with on-leash walking if you start with retractable now. Why not put him on a regular leash and walk him around the same area that you would use for the extendable leash? That way, he will learn leash manners, get exercise, and be forced to listen to you!
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  #19  
Old 01-05-2007, 12:50 PM
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Love That Collie Love That Collie is offline
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Herschel.......... (those on Chazhound are the only ones who
know I sat in the kitchen floor and cried) hehehehe
Hey and thanks for the reply on the bone thread!
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  #20  
Old 01-05-2007, 01:05 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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Quote:
Shevelle, from your above post where you mention that you have trained all your other dogs in your life but Bella isn't doing what they did when they did it etc... and I believe that you obviously feel that you have failed. This isn't true, please don't let it get you down. Because, as I told you in your very first thread about this subject, I know where you are coming from.

I too had always trained ALL of my dogs from the time I was a kid and I have had many dogs throughout my life, including three Chows. And they presented no problem for me. However, when I got Bailey, I was so taken aback by his "herding" and his biting and when he didn't respond as quickly or how I wanted him to respond I became inwardly frustrated that this young puppy was getting the better of ME, that I had actually sat in the middle of the kitchen floor and cried! (while he was out of the room of course) I just could not believe that I could NOT get through to him NOT to bite me, bruise me and rip up the backs of my legs!! WHAT in the world was I doing wrong??? Or what in the H@!! was wrong with him?

I even hired one of those expensive trainers that come to your home which made me feel even more defeated to think that I couldn't train MY own dog as I had so, so many over 30 years!! BTW, in my case my money was wasted on the "30 year experienced dog trainer" the worst money I EVER spent!!

So, you know what happened? I thought about it long and hard and even considered sending him back to the breeder who was more than willing to do whatever I decided. When I thought long and hard, I decided that it was me who was trying to make Bailey into all those other pups/dogs in my life that I had trained so beautifully and had done exactly as I had said, that he was merely a CHALLENGE, the biggest challenge that a small puppy of mine had presented to me and more time was needed for ME to overcome MY challenge. When I stopped treating him like he was like all the other puppies I had had (because he was not) and not letting him get ANYTHING for free and sticking to my "guns" then things began to fall into place not to mention he started maturing. Bailey HAD a lot of stubborness and will, and he was/is so smart and I knew it, but my stubborness, will and smarts I decided had to be bigger than his. And it worked. And with time I realized that I wasn't a failure it was just that I hadn't been prepared for the challenge right off the bat! So, don't give up on Bella she will probably grow up to be the "softest mouthed" dog you ever owned! I know Bailey now is.
Great post!

Another thing I think is helpful is to figure out what instinct, what drive or predatory motor pattern it is he is so driven to do so much of the time...and find a constructive outlet for that. I think it's important to recognize that this is not a dog being naughty or stubborn, but a dog doing exactly what he is hard wired to do in order to survive, hunt and reproduce to make the specie thrive.

To try to completely eliminate it or stop the behavior altogether is hopeless. You're fighting a losing battle and trying to supress it only makes the dog more explosive and frustrated inside. He needs a way to express these drives, but in a constructive way. So, if you can figure out what this behavior resembles as far as in nature... and replicate it with some other activity, other than your legs and arms being torn to shreds, do that.

All dog have some, but not usually all of the predatory motor patterns. Wovles have all of them. They are: eye stalk, chase, bite, kill, consume. Which patterns are leading up to this behavior and where are they cutting off? (In your puppies case, this is all practice for when he's an adult and at this time, in the form of play.) Does he have the eye stalk like a Border Collie? Something (breeding) in a Border Collie stops him after the eye stalk, chase and bite, sometimes before the bite. He does not kill or consume. (normally) Or is your puppy skipping that eye stalk and going to the chase, bite and stopping before the kill and consume? Zero in on what he's doing, probably the chase and bite. So, give him something else to chase and bite instead of your legs. Outside, take a wiggly toy on a rope and run with it. Let him chase and bite it. Show him the distinction between that and your legs. Leg biting ends all play immediately. He is controlled with a leash and/or isolated for a few minutes. Chasing, capturing and biting the toy is rewarding and reinforcing. Be consistant and practice several times a day for short periods. Give him treats too, although getting to catch the "prey"....the toy, is the life reward...the natural reward in this case. But some yummy treats would be a bonus.

He'll mature too and along with effective obedience training, good exercise and constructive outlets for his predatory drives, he'll grow up to be a responsible dog who knows ho to get along with humans and your boundaries.
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"If you love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." -- Samuel Adams 1776





"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

Thomas Jefferson
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