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  #11  
Old 10-04-2006, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Borntoleadk9.com View Post
taking a food bowl away that we give them and taking a pill or bug or anything that they took is way different. besides, thats why we train the leave it command.
A leave it command is completely different than teaching a dog not to resource guard. Every session/class/private is an opportunity to address this incredibly important potential problem, I would never just let a dog have his food.
In every puppy class, I teach the owner how to change their dogs perception about giving up any and all items. The worst thing that anyone can do is forcibly take anything from a dog. You must instead teach a dog through positive methods...removing an item and giving it right back or trading for something else during this important learning phase. If this is not done during puppyhood, this natural instinct often becomes a big problem as the dog gets older, but it is still correctable.
FYI, more dogs are euthanized in shelters for this correctable problem than any other behavior issue.
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  #12  
Old 10-04-2006, 11:11 AM
Borntoleadk9.com Borntoleadk9.com is offline
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Originally Posted by dr2little View Post
A leave it command is completely different than teaching a dog not to resource guard. Every session/class/private is an opportunity to address this incredibly important potential problem, I would never just let a dog have his food.
In every puppy class, I teach the owner how to change their dogs perception about giving up any and all items. The worst thing that anyone can do is forcibly take anything from a dog. You must instead teach a dog through positive methods...removing an item and giving it right back or trading for something else during this important learning phase. If this is not done during puppyhood, this natural instinct often becomes a big problem as the dog gets older, but it is still correctable.
FYI, more dogs are euthanized in shelters for this correctable problem than any other behavior issue.

oh absolutley! that is a horrible reason to put a dog down. i agree 100% with everything you said. you are 100% right.

i was talking about the leave it command in response to someones post about what if the dog takes a pill or something he shouldnt take. in this case, this is the point of the leave it command.

the only thing i do not do is take a food bowl away from dogs. i think there are better ways to address food aggression issues and like you say, if done early, the problem will not develop.
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  #13  
Old 10-04-2006, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Borntoleadk9.com View Post
oh absolutley! that is a horrible reason to put a dog down. i agree 100% with everything you said. you are 100% right.

i was talking about the leave it command in response to someones post about what if the dog takes a pill or something he shouldnt take. in this case, this is the point of the leave it command.

the only thing i do not do is take a food bowl away from dogs. i think there are better ways to address food aggression issues and like you say, if done early, the problem will not develop.
I have to ask, what is it about the food bowl that you consider "off limits"?

You do know that general "food aggression" resource guarding tests done in rescues are always done using the food bowl..after all, it is a very high value resource.
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  #14  
Old 10-04-2006, 12:09 PM
Borntoleadk9.com Borntoleadk9.com is offline
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im not sure i understand what you are asking? i assume you are asking why i do not take the food bowl away from my dog?

i do not take the food bowl away because IMO i gave it to the dog and it is his food once i let him have it. i beleive taking the bowl away from a dog THAT ALREADY HAS FOOD AGGRESSION ISSUES only justifies his concern that we will take the food away.

i am a dictator, but a fair dictator. if i give FOOD that was earned, it is now the dogs food.

while i will not take the food away i will pet the dog, and stick my hand in the food and around the food while they eat to let them know that i may be a presence but i am not taking anything. this method has produced very good results for me in preventing dogs from developing food issues.

we can get into the entire food, toy, resource territorialism but thats not the issue at hand. all these are tied together as far as i am concerned.

the dog owns NOTHING and only earns the right to eat my food and play with my toys.
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  #15  
Old 10-07-2006, 02:37 AM
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Back on subject

I personally know both of Dig's dogs, but haven't seen them in a few months. The problem seems to be escalating since I left. I've eaten dinner at her house on many occassions and her male never once growled at me or showed any sign of aggression.

Have you decided on a trainer yet, Digs? I know you had a few in mind. Have you thought about NILIF... or a similar approach where he learns that all food comes from your hand. Of course, then you'd be putting your hand, his mouth and food all very close together.
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  #16  
Old 10-08-2006, 05:23 PM
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I wholeheartedly agree that a problem such as food aggression is not something that should be "worked around". It's a serious problem that should be dealt with immediately.

Whilst saying that, I do understand that some dogs are more likely to have food aggression.

But, as many of you know, I'm kind of a stickler when it comes to things like bones/high value treats etc. It is simply NOT acceptable to growl.

I know dober hates my attitude but it is what it is

EVERYTHING is mine. If I want it. I get it.

Now of course I don't over do and force them to resource guard. But quite simply, neither of my dogs have food aggression and only a few times, in the beginning, have I gotten so much as a snarl for taking away a yummy meaty bone.

I was just lucky that my attitude worked with my two dogs, because with any other it may have been a tragedy.

I believe it was Doberluv that mentioned desensitizing, which IMO is the number one for dealing with almost any dog problem. Food aggression, dog on dog aggression, human aggression etc.

In slow steps, whilst discouraging the behaviours you don't want.

My two dogs used to share a food bowl, we never had any scuffles. Not one. They eat side by side now, high value food, wet dog food, no scuffles whatsoever. In fact when they are both done, they simaltaneously switch bowls to make sure no one left anything behind. Mind you, for the first few weeks, of feeding wet food, with them so close, I stood within a few feet of them. If the one of the dog's heads came out of the bowl and even looked in the other dog's direction, thinking about checking it out, verbal correction, and if that didn't work, redirection.

I guess what I would do, is in slow steps desensitize, and discourage the bad behaviour by taking away what it is they want so badly. The mentality, "You don't behave. You don't eat". My harsh attitude arises MWAHAHAH! LOL

As I moved on, I'd most likely leash the aggressive dog. If they lash out, hard, quick leash correction, verbal correction. I'd place the two animals where they couldn't reach each other, but still in each other's presence.

Although, I must say, depending on the dogs age, desensitizing this food aggressive dog 100% may be impossible. Learned behaviours, *aggressive* now learned behaviours, can be extremely hard and DANGEROUS to correct.

I wish you luck!

Oh, and of course I wouldn't allow the other dog to push the problem further, by going near the food aggressive dog while it was eating. They would BOTH get corrected for even nearing the other dogs "personal bubble".
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  #17  
Old 10-08-2006, 05:37 PM
silverpawz silverpawz is offline
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Quote:
As I moved on, I'd most likely leash the aggressive dog. If they lash out, hard, quick leash correction, verbal correction. I'd place the two animals where they couldn't reach each other, but still in each other's presence.
I would never reccomend leash correcting a food aggressive dog when they lash out. I certainly believe corrections have their place, but that place is not in this situation.

Leash for safety? Of course. Tethering for safety is a good idea as well. But physical corrections at this stage of the game would probably provoke the dog even further.

Growling at other people while they eat is not a good sign. Not okay in any way shape or form. This speaks of a bigger issue than simple food bowl aggression.

How is the relationship with this dog in other areas? Is he obedient? Will he lie down on command right away? Without food present? What do you expect of him daily?
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  #18  
Old 10-08-2006, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Tethering for safety is a good idea as well.
I meant tethering, but tethering itself will give the dog a leash correction. When the dog moves quickly for the other dog, it will get quickly pulled back, aka leash correction.
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  #19  
Old 10-08-2006, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by silverpawz View Post

Leash for safety? Of course. Tethering for safety is a good idea as well. But physical corrections at this stage of the game would probably provoke the dog even further.
A proper leash correction in this situation can work. It's not going to provoke the dog further if you do it right.
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  #20  
Old 10-08-2006, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by roughcollies View Post
A proper leash correction in this situation can work. It's not going to provoke the dog further if you do it right.
Leash corrections really have no place in desensitizing for resource guarding.

Correcting this behavior will not positively impact the way the dogs feels about what he's guarding. Desensitizing is the ONLY way to ensure that the behavior has truly become extinct and of course there is no correction delivered during desensitizing...EVER.

While many behaviors "appear to be fixed" using correction, correcting for guarding will only result in an unpredictable dog who will need constant supervision with items that he chooses to guard.
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