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  #1  
Old 10-01-2006, 06:38 PM
majicgrl majicgrl is offline
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Question Any thoughts???

Is there anyone here who have tried the Citronella collars to stop barking ? I have a VERY voiceful Chihuahua, barks at fresh air... and before i get an eviction notice i would like to try one of these collars, but Id like to hear if anyone has had success with them personally before i go out and spend 100 on a colla
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Old 10-01-2006, 06:41 PM
PoodleMommy PoodleMommy is offline
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if i understand these collars correctly I believe they spray something towards the dogs face to stop the barking.

If this is correct, I do not like the idea... i also have a very very barky dog and we are doing our best to work on it with commands such as leave it or enough. This being said, dogs do bark but with training you should be able to cut down on it without spraying stuff on them all the time..

Elissa
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Old 10-01-2006, 06:47 PM
silverpawz silverpawz is offline
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I've used them. Some work well, others mis-fire. I'm not thrilled with the idea of spraying somthing so potent in the face of an animal with such a powerful nose. I can only image how irritating that would be for them even after the fact.

Some dogs learn how to bark right through the spray and empty the bottle. Others only need one spray and they quiet up pretty quick.

If you choose to get one I'd spring for a top quality collar and not a cheap petsmart brand.

What else have you tried? I'd want to work on this the ol' fashioned way with some training before using the collar.
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Old 10-01-2006, 06:48 PM
PoodleMommy PoodleMommy is offline
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Originally Posted by silverpawz View Post

What else have you tried? I'd want to work on this the ol' fashioned way with some training before using the collar.
Thats what i was trying to say make sure you exhaust all your other options first.

Elissa
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  #5  
Old 10-01-2006, 07:01 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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I have two very vocal Chihuahuas, one Doberman with a range from bass to soprano and another dog who barks worse than my Chihuahuas. She's still in training. The other dogs, the two Chi's and the Dobe will stop pretty well when I tell them "enough."

I wouldn't dream of spraying something at my little dumplings. I think that would be very mean. And possibly injurious to their sensative nasal passages and eyes. Their nasal passages are used for cooling the brain. I wouldn't want that harsh stuff going into them. And it just isn't very nice to do that to a dog. That said....

How I trained my dogs was to go to them after letting them bark a little bit. I'd tell them something to the effect of "thank you" (for the warning) and then distract them. When they stop for even a breath, even for a second, I'd say the word, "enough" and give them a treat. Repeat as needed. Associate the stopping of the barking with the cue, "enough" or "quiet" and reward lavishly. Do not say, "enough" while the dog is barking or she'll learn that enough means to bark. Wait for a quiet few seconds. Later on, once the cue word is definitely associated with the quiet, you can try saying "enough" while she's barking, but make SURE to get her attention on you. You have to go TO the dog, not yell from a distance. Sometimes hollering makes them think you're just joining in in the chorus. LOL. So, for a long time, you have to be very consistant and persistant in going to the dog, distracting, waiting for a couple of seconds of quiet, saying the cue and praise/treat lavishly. Keep it up. It is not an easy thing to teach because the barking in itself is fun. They love hearing themselves bark. So, you have to make it better for them to stop than to continue.

My dogs aren't perfect, but they're much, much better. Chulita really does stop right away. The others....sometimes I have to still go to them when it really is something "bad" outside.
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Old 10-01-2006, 07:18 PM
majicgrl majicgrl is offline
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Thank you.. I wasnt to thrilled about the idea either, thats why i thought id ask around.. my pups defiantly need more socializing! That was likely my biggest mistake... I have tried a cue, usually enough, but I have been doing it I guess at the wrong times...lol If i can get a work in with them I will try to say it when they are not barking Its time to look into classes to get them used to people and other animals... Everytime we walk them its horrible, the oldest one will pull barking and jumping towards people, It made me change our walking schedule to the evening when things are quieter Any other tips are definatly welcomed :-)
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Old 10-01-2006, 07:19 PM
PoodleMommy PoodleMommy is offline
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Doberluv, thank you for that reply, it will be a help to me.

We were told my a trainer awhile back to say enough when they are barking, so we say enough a million times and she doesnt stop I guess we taught her to bark, ugh!

I will definetly be trying your advice and seeing if we can work on this better,

Thanks Again

Elissa
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Old 10-01-2006, 07:20 PM
PoodleMommy PoodleMommy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majicgrl View Post
Thank you.. I wasnt to thrilled about the idea either, thats why i thought id ask around.. my pups defiantly need more socializing! That was likely my biggest mistake... I have tried a cue, usually enough, but I have been doing it I guess at the wrong times...lol If i can get a work in with them I will try to say it when they are not barking Its time to look into classes to get them used to people and other animals... Everytime we walk them its horrible, the oldest one will pull barking and jumping towards people, It made me change our walking schedule to the evening when things are quieter Any other tips are definatly welcomed :-)
majicgrl, i guess we will be working on this together, lol
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Old 10-01-2006, 07:40 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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Quote:
We were told my a trainer awhile back to say enough when they are barking, so we say enough a million times and she doesnt stop I guess we taught her to bark, ugh!
Yes, you always want to pair the cue word with the desired behavior, not with your thoughts about the desired behavior. LOL. You may be thinking that you want the dog to stop barking so you say the cue word. But the dog has no idea what the word means yet, for one thing and he can't read your mind as to what you'd like him to do. Later, when he has made the association....and seems to be responding well 99% of the time to your distraction and cue word paired with the quiet, then you can try using the cue word first to try and elicit the behavior. You'll have to gradually lengthen the duration of quiet before the treat as the dog is learning. In other words, he can learn to stop, get the treat and start up again. So, be prepared to up the ante for duration gradually. That goes for anything. You may want to not use the same word now that she has learned that it doesn't mean anything. The word, in other words is poisoned. (This paragraph is an edit so the rest of this post I use "enough" as an example, but you can choose another word)

With this, you really have to be ready for a long haul. Like I said, it's not one of the easiest things for them to do.

Quote:
If i can get a work in with them I will try to say it when they are not barking
Just to make sure you didn't misunderstand me: It won't make sense to them to just give the cue any ole' time they're not barking. For all they know, "enough" could be for something else. (I use it for other things too) It is important to make the distinction between barking and stopping.

If your dogs are clicker smart, you can make good use of that. They have to breathe. No dog can bark without breathing inbetween. And sometimes they even take up a whole second without barking. LOL. That's when you click the clicker and pop them a tiny treat. But I think in this case, its quicker to go ahead and distract them in some way that they stop for a second, then reward. You don't even have to use the cue word for a while. Just reward when they stop for a second or two. Do that for a long time. Then start adding the cue word to go with the stopping of the barking. They don't know what the word means anyhow. All they have to learn at first is that when they stop, they get a treat.

They will likely also turn your coming over to them as part of the cue to stop. You'll have to go to them every time for a while. When the cue word is in place, you can gradually fade out the "body signal" (going up close to them)...but gradually. They may well think that your going to them means stop barking. But that's ok for the time being. You have to go to them in order to distract them and get them to stop. But be prepared later to have to gradually get further from them as your cue word takes over.

Last edited by Doberluv; 10-01-2006 at 08:06 PM.
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  #10  
Old 10-01-2006, 08:52 PM
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RD RD is offline
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If you really do need control over the barking when you can't be training her (sometimes I need to keep my dogs quiet, training or not) I believe there are collars that spray water instead of citronella. I don't like citronella period - it irritates MY nose and eyes, I can't even imagine what it does to dogs! They do seem to work for some of the dogs at agility class, but I worry that it would be bad for them.

My dog suffers from "doorbell explosions". When he heard a knock or a doorbell ring he'd puff out all his hair and make the loudest, most menacing sound. It really irritated my parents so I taught him to bark ONCE on command. Once he was good at that, I switched the cue from the verbal command to the sound of the doorbell or a knock at the door. Now he does one bark to alert us when someone's at the door. The "job" of obeying the command and giving that one bark when he hears the doorbell keeps his mind off of ROARING at the visitor. If sounds set your dog off, I guess you could apply that to nearly any noise. My other dog is more visually oriented, and I swear he sees things sometimes. Barks at everything.
If either of the boys are barking at something that isn't a threat, I say "pshhh.. What's your problem, dummy?" and lavishly pet/praise the dog that's being quiet. My dogs love to compete for attention and rewards, so the instant one of them hears the other one being praised, they drop whatever they're doing and walk over to see what is going on. That's when the barker gets a reward.
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