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Old 09-07-2006, 01:13 PM
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Default Good places to look at for training certification

I would like to look at some good sites or books, or schools that any of you may know for getting your trainer certification. I am reading some books, and I want to take my time, but I just wanted some opinions on some good places that you may have heard of. I know some of them can be expensive, but I am willing to save up my money to do it. Please let me know any advice, facts, opinions, etc. that may help me along the way. I have been interested in this for years now, and I really want to try to get all the information I can to make an informed decision. I would like to do this, and maybe also dog walking, or dog sitting. Thanks for everything!
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Old 09-07-2006, 01:17 PM
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Here are a few good sites to look into:

www.ccpdt.org/aboutus.html

www.animalbehaviorcollege.com
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Old 09-07-2006, 01:19 PM
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Have you heard anything about either of these?
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Old 09-07-2006, 01:28 PM
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I carry both certifications. CPDT requires that applicants rack up "X" number of hours working with a certified trainer (if not already certified or educated in Canine behavior) and teaching classes/private sessions. You also complete a fairly extensive exam in a very strict setting.
ABC sets you up with a mentor and after successfully completing the technical/exams and book work, (I believe it's about 12 sections with exams after each) you complete your apprenticeship. I'm a mentor for the program in my province and they will set you up with someone certified in your area.
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Old 09-07-2006, 05:07 PM
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Renee said you were the one I needed to talk to. So, can I learn to do it while I still have my current job? Is this something I can do on the weekends and nights (go to school, I mean). I do want to do this full time after I get certified. I did see on the first one that you had to have so many hours and five years training, and I am ready to get started! I also would like to get bonded so that I can pet sit, and dog walk too while the training gets going. I have so many questions, but i don't want to be too overwhelming at once. I am so excited about it and I hope so much that it works out bc I have never wanted anything more. I am starting to read books too so if you have any you recommend, please feel free to give me some titles and authors. I am interested in as much information as you are willing to provide me before you get sick of me!
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Old 09-07-2006, 10:28 PM
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How long is each course?
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Old 09-07-2006, 10:34 PM
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Check your PM in a minute...just so we don't keep a thread going.
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Old 09-07-2006, 10:52 PM
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So ABC isn't a crock? I've always shied away from them because of the association with Petco, but I would like to get certified soon-ish.
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Old 09-07-2006, 11:01 PM
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Personally I feel a certification for dog training is only worth the paper it's written on. There are no official standards for this profession, organizations can make up thier own, but it's not like going to college and getting a degree in a certain field and people who hire you know for sure you've had the proper training. That's just not how it works unfortunetly.

The best thing you can do is get hands on experience. The more the better. Train your own dogs, get some titles on them if you're so inclined, volunteer at a shelter or rescue group and offer to train some of their dogs so they're easier to adopt, offer to train your friend's and neighbor's dogs, read every book you can find, even if you don't think you'll agree with it, learn about ALL methods, even if you don't think you'll use them.

If you can find a trainer in your area who's willing to take you on as an apprentice then you've hit paydirt.

Bottom line, hands on experience working with as many dogs as possible and working with an experienced trainer will give you more than enough knowledge without needing to shell out the big bucks for a certification.

I've been trianing dogs for years and only ever been asked twice if I was certified. Most owners DON'T CARE, they just want you to fix thier problems. If you can get the results, they're happy.

I learned to train by working for another trainer for a few years and doing exactly what I just described. Training shelter dogs, going to seminars, readining books, getting titles on my own dogs, and basically training very dog i could get my hands on. I don't regret for a second not getting certified and I've never lost a potential client because I'm not. Honestly I think it would have been a waste of time and money.
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Old 09-07-2006, 11:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverpawz View Post
Personally I feel a certification for dog training is only worth the paper it's written on. There are no official standards for this profession, organizations can make up thier own, but it's not like going to college and getting a degree in a certain field and people who hire you know for sure you've had the proper training. That's just not how it works unfortunetly.

The best thing you can do is get hands on experience. The more the better. Train your own dogs, get some titles on them if you're so inclined, volunteer at a shelter or rescue group and offer to train some of their dogs so they're easier to adopt, offer to train your friend's and neighbor's dogs, read every book you can find, even if you don't think you'll agree with it, learn about ALL methods, even if you don't think you'll use them.

If you can find a trainer in your area who's willing to take you on as an apprentice then you've hit paydirt.

Bottom line, hands on experience working with as many dogs as possible and working with an experienced trainer will give you more than enough knowledge without needing to shell out the big bucks for a certification.

I've been trianing dogs for years and only ever been asked twice if I was certified. Most owners DON'T CARE, they just want you to fix thier problems. If you can get the results, they're happy.

I learned to train by working for another trainer for a few years and doing exactly what I just described. Training shelter dogs, going to seminars, readining books, getting titles on my own dogs, and basically training very dog i could get my hands on. I don't regret for a second not getting certified and I've never lost a potential client because I'm not. Honestly I think it would have been a waste of time and money.
Actually there are standards and I think you'd be surprised just how complete and detailed both the material and exams are. Practical education is also very complete. Learning from another trainer with "experience" is why there are so many rogue trainers running around using forceful methods taught by old school trainers. I agree that a piece of paper doesn't magically a trainer make but it does teach an "experienced" trainer all of the science that they're often sorely missing. It's a shame that your clients don't care about education. I ONLY recommend trainers with both experience and certification and most Vets do the same.
I'm not sure why anyone would steer someone away from an education...
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