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  #31  
Old 08-11-2006, 04:50 AM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
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Aussie.. .I too believe that they are for experienced handlers. I don't plan on ever owning one, I'mnot sure I could entirely trust them, but I sure would like to be okay in public around them!

Irish-maybe we can get over our fear together! I may need some support!
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  #32  
Old 08-11-2006, 05:17 AM
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me too Bp as stated earlier in this thread I am terrified of them but I think they are pretty . They look cuddley but I'm not going to volunter to cuddle them. The ones here in the shelter have been biters too and I won't even try to take one out to place. I leave that up to people who know how to work with them and don't fear them. Put Aussie Red on the list of chow fear too.
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  #33  
Old 08-11-2006, 01:40 PM
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I don't really fear Chows, though I have never had a too bad of an experience with any breed.

~Tucker
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  #34  
Old 08-11-2006, 04:27 PM
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I***8217;never had a fear of any breed, and I hope I never will. My favorite breeds are Rottweilers, Pit Bulls, Dobies, GSD, Filas, and generally anything that has a bad rep and is misunderstood. I like the tough guys, because they are usually the sweetest and most loyal pups around, and I believe the same goes for Chows
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  #35  
Old 08-12-2006, 03:09 AM
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I'm the same way, I dont fear any breed, but I have been scared of a few dogs. In WI someone moved in behind my place with 3 fighter pittbulls, another story for a different time. One was kept chained up. I feared mainly for Gracie! So afraid that thing would get loose and rip her apart. Gracie is a very gentle girl. She doesnt want any trouble. I'm sorry people are so scared of Chows. Once you got to know their personalities, I think most of you would fall in love with them.
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  #36  
Old 08-12-2006, 06:37 AM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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Well darn, I just now saw this thread! When it started, I was 200 miles away with my dogs in an obedience trial and I've just been pretty busy overall.

I have three chows and have been active with the breed overall for a number of years now. All of my dogs are trained and titled - even my young dog earned her first title this past weekend. I've been to chow nationals a couple of times (think 300+ chows all at the same place!) and showed one of mine in obedience both times when there.

The chow is a spitz breed, with the typical independent mind that spitz breeds have. They were bred for a variety of tasks, including pulling, packing, herding and guarding. A good chow has a solid temperament, with no unwarranted aggression. They may not be particularly friendly, however - the standard calls for them to be "aloof" but that doesn't equal aggressive.

However, like so many breeds, they became popular awhile back and people started breeding frantically to make some quick money. These backyard-type breeders were not particularly concerned with temperament and the chow did spiral downhill for awhile. GOOD breeders are working hard to bring back that solid temperament, but unfortunately there are still people out there just trying to make the almighty buck. I remember when this happened with dalmatians and St. Bernards and other breeds too. It's not just the chow that has gone through this problem.

Most chows, as adults, are kind of indifferent about other people and dogs. Mine will greet someone but that's generally it - they don't expect a bunch of petting and go their own ways to explore. My black chow is a classic chow temperament. I can take her anywhere and she'll look at people and dogs and then just kind of shrug her shoulders and do her own thing. She's not aggressive towards anyone, however, but if someone doesn't understand her attitude they may feel she is not friendly and therefore not a nice dog.

Anyone with a fear of any breed should try to contact a breed group in their area to see if they can meet with experienced owners who have nice dogs. They can learn about the breed and have some hands-on experience with the dogs. If I were afraid of every breed that had ever bitten me or attempted to bite me, I'd hate labs, goldens, dalmatians, terriers of various types, Australian cattle dogs, Australian shepherds, chihuahuas, hounds, German shepherds, chows, huskies, shih tzus, bichons, etc. (there are others, just can't think of them all). I've been teaching pet and competition classes for more than a decade and a half and I do behavior consultations with people with problem dogs. There are good dogs in every breed and bad dogs in every breed. It's nearly always the owner that creates the problem, too.

My older chow has earned five obedience titles, four agility titles, a schutzhund BH and is herding certified. She has visited the nursing home and preschools and everyone has loved her. My middle chow has agility titles and a leg towards obedience, and she too has visited the nursing home. My youngest just earned her first title, has visited the nursing home and is signed up for a therapy dog class next month. All three came from diverse backgrounds. They are absolutely wonderful loving dogs and I have no fear that anyone will get bit by one.

So please find a way to get around some good chows, and don't let your bias create problems for you regarding the chows at the dog park. From what you described, they sound like they're just being typical "I'm going to do my own thing" kind of dogs and are likely no problem at all. Chows are actually very easy to get along with when they are like that. Most dogs won't even bother with them because their body language says "Naw, I'm not interested in playing .. I'd rather just sniff over here". Dogs understand that.

Here's Kylee at the nursing home:



And Khana getting a "hug on the run" from my nephew:



Melanie and the gang in Alaska
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  #37  
Old 08-12-2006, 11:30 AM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
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I've been waiting for you to appear Melanie!

I have been in contact with a couple experienced breeders/handlers in my area and like I said above, I do plan on talking to the owners of the two chows that come to the dog park. Their chows are actually go up to people, etc and play with dogs, so I have found that it will be in my best interest to do my best to get over my fear of them.

Unfortunately (for Chows) I have never had a bad experience with any other breed. I look back and each bad experience I have had with chows has been bad, from being bitten to being attacked by a group...NOT FUN.

BUT, I do realize that not all Chows are bad, I DO realize this. I was in the wrong place at the wrong time, but being in those places formed a fear and it is not just to the Chow breed.

It saddens me that some people can get a hold of animals and turn them "bad." We see it everyday in the papers about Pit Bulls.

But I may have to keep you on my Buddy's list, Melanie, because I don't see this going away quickly, but I really want to make a whole-hearted honest effort. It will take time and I'm hoping that eventually I will get over my fear!
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  #38  
Old 08-12-2006, 10:49 PM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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It sounds like you're taking the right steps to help get over your fear! Good job.

You know, part of the problem with chows is that they can be hard to "read". They tend to be a bit stoic in the way they look at things and it's hard to see the body language - even other dogs have that problem.

If you can meet some good chows and learn about their quirky personalities, you might actually come to like them. I have never seen such clowns - my little Dora (the black chow) is absolutely hilarious at times. And chows have this "zoomies" behavior that I've never seen quite the same in any other breed. They are so calm and relaxed most of the time, and then will suddenly tuck their butts, unroll their tails and ZOOM around. It lasts for a short time (a few minutes) and then they're right back to being normal again. During the "zoomies" they usually grunt and make all sorts of funny noises as they race past you .. *L* .. all three of my chows do this behavior at times.

What a bad dog has taken away, a good dog can give back. Hopefully you will find a way to let a good dog help you through this.

I remember back when I was active in 4-H horse groups, I was at the fair one year showing my horse in the open group and judging the 4-H classes. I had several adults approach me and talk to me about my horse, and I was amazed at how many said "I'm scared of horses because .. " and they would go on and tell of a single experience from their childhood. That one time of falling off or getting bucked off or kicked had set them up for a fear for the rest of their lives.

Then there are people like me, who has gone off a horse more times than I want to admit to .. *LOL* .. who has been kicked and stepped on (broke a toe too) .. and who has been bitten by several dogs (I work with aggressive dogs and I push the limits at times .. such is life) .. and I just don't have those fears. I have learned more caution with age, of course, and I know my limitations these days. But I never developed a fear like other describe. Maybe there are certain types of personalities more likely to find things like that traumatic? Who knows ..

Good luck to you, and I hope you can find a nice fluffy friendly chow to hug on and get to know!

Melanie and the gang
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  #39  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:32 AM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
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Thanks Melanie!

I really am trying and thanks for not getting defensive about chows. I really hope I am able to get over my fear!
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  #40  
Old 08-18-2006, 06:44 PM
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I just believe that dogs can sense fear, and that its not as much the
breed as it is how the animal is raised.
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