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  #11  
Old 08-13-2006, 12:12 PM
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Charlotte Charlotte is offline
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I had my bunny from the time he was five weeks until he passed away last year. He was 8. I think the most important thing I learned was that his diet had to be followed diligently. Timothy hay had to be his main food source. With fresh greens daily, such as carrot tops, dandelion, parsley etc. House Rabbit Society has some very good info on their web sites. My bunny was a free range bunny and very easy to litter train. Not at all the cuddly little creatures that you would assume. He loved to be patted, but not picked up and would kick up quite a fuss whenever we had to pick him up. A visit to the vet every three months also to have his nails trimmed as they can grow vey long and be most uncomfortable. Good luck with your bunny and enjoy him
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  #12  
Old 08-13-2006, 02:28 PM
Kay Kay is offline
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A regular diet for rabbits *is* extremely important. Though baby rabbits (Under 6 mos.) Have very different dietary needs from adults.

When they are young, they need a 24/7 supply of good protein rabbit pellets, and a 24/7 supply of alfalfa hay (Or an alfalfa/timothy hay mix, makes the transition from the alfalfa to timothy only easier)
Their green veggies need to be introduced very slowly, one at a time in small quantaties and increased gradually. By the time the rabbits are 6-7 mos. old, their veggies should continue to be increased, their pellets slowly decreased, and their alfalfa hay should decrease from their diet, being replaced with timothy until it's been safely taken out of their diet. By the time a rabbit is 12 mos. old, they should have no alfalfa hay, they should have a large amount varied greens that had been carefully introduced and increased daily, they should have timothy hay 24/7 (Very important) and a very small amount of rabbit pellets, if any. My adult rabbits get a small small bowl of pellets in the morning, their hay is refreshed 3-4 times a day, and they get their veggies every evening. Rabbits have very, very sensitive digestive systems, so it is important to use caution when changing their diet.
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  #13  
Old 08-13-2006, 02:51 PM
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Whisper Whisper is offline
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I have a rabbit named Blossom. She lives in my room. She's a gray dwarf rabbit and she is super soft, cute, and very well socialized. She and my dogs get along great! I even have a lab/bc mix with a high drive for little "wild" rabbits everytime one runs by, and just because she's extremely well trained and socialized, she does the rabbit no harm and does nothing more than sniff and lick. Even so, they should never be left alone with a dog, even if your dog acts perfectly around them!
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  #14  
Old 08-13-2006, 08:56 PM
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Adrienne Adrienne is offline
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I have three rabbits, Diva a female flemish giant, Samara, a lop/flemish mix, and Fergi, a Mini-lop....

My dog's all get along well with the rabbits but are never left unattened of course. Diva is great with them but she is larger than your average cat so she can stand up for herself a bit.
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  #15  
Old 08-14-2006, 06:25 AM
Kay Kay is offline
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Even if she's large she is still a rabbit ---- Rabbits are extremely fragile, and can never be left in the eye of danger, unattended with any dog or cat.

I know you've said you don't leave them unattended together, I'm just stressing the point for other people, flemishes aren't exceptions to rules, they are still rabbits, still extremely fragile.
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  #16  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:26 PM
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brem brem is offline
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I have 3 rabbits, and we are bunny sitting a 4th for a couple of weeks.

They get along well with my Shih Tzu, however, he's very playful and could hurt them badly if I didn't supervise him. He likes to lick their ears... but sometimes bites to play, so never leave the dog free from you grasp.


Yoshi + Bowser, chillin'


Marvin + Yoshi, kissin'


Frimousse


Bowser + Wendy (the bunny sitted bunny)
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YOSHI the Shih Tzu and Marvin, Bowser & Frimousse the bunnies (and me)
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  #17  
Old 08-15-2006, 12:15 PM
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Adrienne Adrienne is offline
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Thanks for your concern. I do understand that a Flemish is still a rabbit but they are hardy rabbits, not saying they can stand up to a dog but she knows how to throw her weight around!
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  #18  
Old 08-17-2006, 04:14 AM
Kathy29 Kathy29 is offline
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Thanks all!

I'm having MAJOR problems picking my new bunny up. I want to get him accustomed to being picked up for the sake of having nails trimmed and all that. He shoots right out of my hands/arms (of course, I set myself on the ground to minimize risk of injuries). I'm new at handling rabbits so maybe I'm just not doing it right? Does anyone have any pointers? Thanks!
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  #19  
Old 08-17-2006, 08:57 AM
Kay Kay is offline
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Kathy, the safest way to pick a rabbit up is to have him in a sort of sitting up position.....

Scoop one hand under his front feet, one hand sort of under his rump but also supporting his back (Rabbits have INCREDIBLY fragile bone structures, they can break their backs with one good kick if their backs are not supported.

When you're holding him he should be in a sitting up position, feet facing away from you and hanging (That way if he kicks he's not kicking against you and propelling himself off of you...Those guys do have some pretty hard kicks in them) One hand should be under his rump/supporting his back, one had should be under his front paws but supporting him by his chest, and he should be pulled securely into your chest. I generally have their backs a little arched (Natural for a rabbit if you watch them move around) with my hand under their rump and my fingers sort of between their legs. As long as you prevent their back from straightening they won't snap it, just make sure you don't make his back arch more than is natural though; they can kick the air all the want as long as they are supported properly . He may try to climb your arm with his front paws but as long as you hold him secure enough until that fit is over he shouldn't be able to get out of your arms. As for nail clipping, some rabbits will never allow it to be done with only one person, unless you trance him (Google trancing rabbits) But I don't like doing that as I really believe it helps your rabbit mistrust you. Anyways, that is the safest way to carry a bun, and with some of the rabbits I deal with is really the only way to hold them without them fighting and propelling themself off of you, getting scratched in the meantime.

here is a good link on trancing your rabbit:

http://www.hopperhome.com/trancing_rabbits.htm

Read the entire page to decide wether you really want to trance your bun or not.

Last edited by Kay; 08-17-2006 at 09:12 AM.
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  #20  
Old 08-23-2006, 09:04 AM
Kathy29 Kathy29 is offline
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Kay, thanks for your help! I've been covering his eyes while picking him up as a lot of people were telling me to try that and it works ONLY for a very short while. I will try your method with him tonight.

As for trancing, I know there are a lot of debate about that. I'll have to look more into it. Thanks again.
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