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  #41  
Old 07-19-2006, 03:25 PM
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  #42  
Old 07-19-2006, 04:26 PM
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If you are going to neuter great-bulldogs are hard to breed and it costs a ton.

as far as when to neuter I don't like to see dogs altered untill they are fully mature. Especially with dogs that have bodys that can somewhat-I don't know adversely affect them later on in life.

But if there is any chance at all your dog could get to a female then fix at six months.
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  #43  
Old 07-19-2006, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joce
as far as when to neuter I don't like to see dogs altered untill they are fully mature. Especially with dogs that have bodys that can somewhat-I don't know adversely affect them later on in life.
I don't really understand why you don't want to alter them until fully mature? Can you please explain a little more? What do you mean by "dogs that have bodies that can adversly affect them later on in life" Not sure what that means, like what kind of bodies or type of dog? Or do you mean all dogs?
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  #44  
Old 07-19-2006, 05:52 PM
AnimalLoverCatRescuer AnimalLoverCatRescuer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanL
Let me preface this by saying that I support spay/neutering, but your post has a lot of assumptions that aren't always true.

1- marking. We had our pug fixed at 4 months old. He is 5 years old now and has marked his entire life. Continually. Outside, he will mark something, then turn around and hit it from another angle. I've never counted, but I would guess that an average trip outside for 30 minutes will have him marking 50 times. Our GSD, who is 17 months old and is not fixed yet, didn't start marking anything till he was over a year old, and he doesn't mark with near the frequency the pug does. He might hit a couple objects while he's outside and has never marked anything indoors, where the pug will mark indoors if you don't watch him. The GSD didn't even lift his leg until he was 10 months old.

2- if a dog has aggressive tendencies and isn't trained on how to act around other dogs, fixing won't help. You can see examples of unfixed dogs who are not aggressive all the time in dog shows, agility, and other activities where dogs interact. Changing his personality is all subjective. A well adjusted, trained, loved dog should not have personality issues whether he's fixed or not. On the cat front, we just had our female spayed. She was a cuddly love bug before she was fixed. Now she's aloof and not nearly as lovey as she was before. She's still sweet but doesn't spend hours on your lap purring anymore.

3- There are studies that show that fixing can cause other health problems, so it's not a cure all for potential diseases later in life.

4- my friends had their cat fixed and she turned into the meanest, nastiest cat I ever saw. You can't walk into their house without the cat hissing at you and swatting you as you walk by.

And that is exactly why I said various things like "possibly being agressive" and it "should change the behavior for the better" "greatly reduces the chances of getting disease and cancer" and that last paragraph, yes I should have said "it CAN change behavior for the better" not a definate "It will" so I will go back and edit that because you are right. That isn't always the case. Just a majority.
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  #45  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnimalLoverCatRescuer
I don't really understand why you don't want to alter them until fully mature? Can you please explain a little more? What do you mean by "dogs that have bodies that can adversly affect them later on in life" Not sure what that means, like what kind of bodies or type of dog? Or do you mean all dogs?
There are studies that have shown that altering a male too young will cause them to not grow the same way they would if they were intact. Mainly, the dogs grow taller and are more slender, with longer legs, and don't fill out as much as they would if they were intact. My former OB trainer had Aussies, and one of hers was over 24" tall, way taller than he should be, because he was fixed at 8 weeks. He was blade thin too. He killed in the 24" agility class though!

This is why we have not altered Gunnar yet. We probably won't before he's 3, to make sure he's full grown and completely filled out.
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  #46  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:09 PM
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if a sheltie is neutered before hes grown his full coat, then his coat will just mostly stop growing when he gets neutered,
thats why most people with shelties wait until there dogs have grown there full coat before they neuter them
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  #47  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:13 PM
AnimalLoverCatRescuer AnimalLoverCatRescuer is offline
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Ohh ok I didnt realize that. I am honestly more of a cat person, in which case I am all for pediatric spay/neuters.

I will have to do a little more research on that topic with dogs. All the shelters I have worked at and all the people I know have had their dogs altered well before 6 months and I have never known of any problems. I doubt it is the case in every dog. Just certain breeds or individual dogs.
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  #48  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:18 PM
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Yes, I wouldn't think that a small dog would be as affected as a large dog. We had our pug fixed young, as I mentioned, and he's a nice stocky boy now, but it's hard to say how it affected him. It certainly didn't affect him peeing on every blade of grass in the yard!
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  #49  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:32 PM
AnimalLoverCatRescuer AnimalLoverCatRescuer is offline
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Hmm okay I was just reading what the IVIS had to say about it http://www.ivis.org/advances/Concann...r_frm.asp?LA=1

And it is actually pretty interesting. They basically said exactly what you did DanL about the effect of early neutering in dogs. It said they found the early neuters to be slightly taller.

What I am thinking about is from the point of view of an animal rescue person where it is really better to neuter or spay the dog as early as possible (6-12 weeks) since you have no idea if the adopter will follow through on their contract or not and by 6 months, accidental litters can happen to people who aren't careful or just plain ignorant.

If you are totally responsible and don't let your dog wander, if you aren't letting your dog get pregnant, or you are showing it, then that is a little different. Sorry I always just think about it from the shelter perspective. I doubt I would ever own a purebred though and in that case I would have the dog altered as early as possible.
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  #50  
Old 07-19-2006, 06:49 PM
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I think alot of the shelters are neutering puppies and kittens before they send them to their adoptive families. My shelter cat was neutered at 12 weeks before I brought him home. I got my dog from a different shelter. He was 2 months old, and I just got a voucher to take him to get neutered at 6 months old. They did call and check to see if we had done it, though. My vet recommended waiting until 6 months, but the only reason he gave was that being a little older and weighing a little more made the anaesthesia less risky.
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