Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Dog Breeds


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-24-2006, 01:24 PM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
*Finding My Inner Fila*
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25,373
Default Let's talk about Rotties!

I've mentioned a few times (to my hubby) that I would like to one day, have a rottie.

Awhile back, I was doing my hopeless searching on one of my favorite rescues and they had this gorgeous rottie. I mean, it was an "awwwww" rottie. I had mentioned it to hubby (fully knowing that we would not adopt her, but wanting to touch bases to see how he felt about a rottie to begin with) and he felt really unsure about adopting an adult rottie.

I guess it can sort or be related to adopting an adult pit, which he also wouldn't feel entirely comfortable of. Not to say that we would never own a pit or a rottie, but there are concerns about adopting them when they are adults.. their histories may be unknown, etc..

I've not heard of rotties being dog agressive or human agressive unless trained to do so, am I correct?

And, we do plan on having our own rescue one day (years down the road of course, because, well I'm going to spend so much money on Grad school.. might as well do something with my degrees) and I can't imagine turning away any animals, regardless of their breed.

Ibelieve, with determination and hard work, any breed can be "rescued" but I was hoping people could share some stories or experiences with rotties....
__________________
"A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave". - Mohandas Gandhi

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-24-2006, 01:38 PM
RedyreRottweilers
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

As anyone well knows, I love Rottweilers.

I have owned and loved this breed since the late 80s.

EXPECT dog aggression. SOMEtimes you won't have it, but same sex dog aggression is the rule rather than the exception.

Invest in a really good vacuuum. These things shed year round like you would not believe. I tell my husband every week, LOOK at this bag full of hair? How on EARTH they have a hair left on their bodies I have no idea. I'm serious THEY SHED.

A LOT.

Say goodbye to your nice lawn too. What they don't dig up and shred, they will pound into the dirt with those darling little paws that turn into giant ones. LOL

Get used to a wet lap. One of the Rottweiler Rules of life is drink, then wipe in the nearest person's lap. I swear I can hear them giggle when they do it.

Make sure you enjoy training, and that you can and will be able to give ORDERS to a dog. This breed is a joy, but they can be pushy and overbearing, esp when young. They need early and continuing obedience training and a person who can be in charge.

Fencing is also very important. It is the rare Rottweiler who when of age does not feel the inherent drive to protect what s/he feels is the hearth and home of their owner. Rottweilers WILL threaten an intruder or trespasser, and most will back it up with deadly force if pressed. ANYONE considering this breed should well understand this aspect of it. These dogs have been bred for over a hundred years to be couragous and fearless under a threat. The VAST majority of them still are. Of course with proper training and socialization, almost every Rottweiler can be a joy to take about, and really enjoy mixing and mingling with people of all kinds. To a large degree this is dependent on early socialization and training by responsible owners. The liability that goes with owning a dog such as this should be carefully considered before one makes the decision to own one.

Home owners insurance can be an issue.

Another sad fact is that due to Breed Specific Legislation, ownership of this breed is illegal or restricted in more areas than you might think. This should be carefully researched before any purchase.

Health issues are also of concern in this breed. Responsible breeders will be carefully screening all stock for hip, elbow, eye, and heart issues. Even with careful screening and the MOST responsible breeding, problems can happen. Being aware is advisable.

On the plus side, these are some of the most loving, playful fun strong wonderful dogs I've ever been around.

If you can deal with the responsibility, training, and shedding (!!), they are just awesome dogs.

When properly bred, socialized, trained, and confined, there is no better companion dog out there, as far as I'm concerned.



Further reading and information can be found at http://www.amrottclub.org
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-24-2006, 01:43 PM
Snark's Avatar
Snark Snark is offline
Mutts to you
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Midwest
Posts: 3,731
Default

I, too, would love one day to have a rottie and I don't have a problem with adopting an adult. (Most of my foundlings have been adults anyway, I actually prefer an adult dog - don't have to *usually* worry about housebreaking, chewing, the zoomies at 10pm, etc.)
Most rescue organizations are pretty careful about the temperament of the dogs they rescue and will note any problems the dog might have (that they know about), such as: would be better as an only dog, doesn't like cats, etc. I figure my biggest problem will be 'qualifying' to adopt one, given some of the requirements. (I've got about three acres fenced for the dogs, but it's not a six foot fence so they might turn me down for that. Then, too, I do have to work all day and while my neighbor very nicely checks on my dogs for me, the rescue people might decide that's not good enough, either.)
My younger sister rescued a Rottie from the pound, they were actually taking the dog back to put her to sleep but let Sis have her. (Sis volunteered at the shelter to walk dogs, so they knew her.) It took a little bit to get Maddie used to the cats and vice versa, but she's been a joy to have for the past ten years. She loves people, especially babies, and has the sweetest temperament - even the UPS guys will stop to pet her.
Maddie at the beach:
__________________


I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but Iím not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. -Robert McCloskey
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-24-2006, 01:57 PM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
*Finding My Inner Fila*
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25,373
Default

Oh, she's sweet, Snark.

Thanks for the info, Red. I had no idea they shed that much!!! I'll need a better vacuum if we ever have one.

So, we would need to worry about dog agression if we were to have one in our home, that worries me a bit, but with proper training and control of a dog, it can be handled.

Red, how many rotties have you owned? do you ever keep any from your litters?
__________________
"A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave". - Mohandas Gandhi

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-24-2006, 02:13 PM
RedyreRottweilers
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Oh gosh, BP, I've owned quite a few over the years.

I have only had surviving puppies from one litter.

I had planned to keep two puppies from that litter, a dog and a bitch.

The bitch came up lame in the forehand at about 6 mos. Before I EVER got to show her.

She had a serious inherited elbow problem called Fragmented Coronoid Process. This was combined with an osteochondritis dessicans lesion on the medial humeral condyle, where the elbow bones meet in the joint.

It required surgery if she were to have ANY sort of normal lifespan without lameness. Thankfully, the surgery went well, and she walked out of the vet's office better than she walked in the day before. She was given to a loving pet home who already had another pet dog I had placed with them.

The young male I kept earned several points towards his CH title as a puppy shown in the Bred By Exhibitor class. He also had elbow abnormalities when I had him screened as a young dog. He was also placed in a pet home subsequently.

I hope to keep at least one if not two puppies from the breeding I am planning now.

Dog aggression varies from dog to dog, and is influenced by the pedigree as well as the socialization and upbringing. If you get a dog who is the opposite sex from your current dog, chances of issues would be greatly minimized.

I recommend bitches for first time owners almost always, as they are smaller, and in my personal experience, less likely to challenge owners, and slightly less dominant.

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-24-2006, 02:14 PM
RedyreRottweilers
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Snark, what a lovely photo.

Such a sweet faced old girl, I'm a sucker for the oldies.

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-24-2006, 02:24 PM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
*Finding My Inner Fila*
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25,373
Default

I'm sorry, Red. At least you found loving homes for them. How often do you breed, err, or have litters, because obviously *you* aren't breeding, lol...

I have no idea what kind of dog(s) we will have if we get a rottie. A fila is planned for sometime next year and really, we'd like to have no more than 3 dogs at a time. (We'll see how that goes).
__________________
"A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave". - Mohandas Gandhi

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-24-2006, 02:26 PM
RedyreRottweilers
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I attempted another litter in 2003.

There were no surviving puppies.

I'm planning to breed Penny later this year, and praying for better luck.

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-24-2006, 02:33 PM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
*Finding My Inner Fila*
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25,373
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedyreRottweilers

There were no surviving puppies.

Oh no!

I just read that on your website about Penny. Good luck! She's gorgeous.
__________________
"A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave". - Mohandas Gandhi

Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-24-2006, 03:36 PM
Bella's Mom's Avatar
Bella's Mom Bella's Mom is offline
Big Dog
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 104
Default

I am on my third adult rescue and they have all been very sweet, they did need some work on doggie manners I'm still trying to break my current rotten one from jumping on people to greet them, they all seem to think they are pocket poodles One issue you must consider are the health issues and there can be many I havent had one live past 8 years old due to arthritis and bad hips or other health problems. Having owned and been loved by a rottie there is no other breed I think, that can beat them for there love and devotion and the personalty that they have. They make perfect family pets
__________________
In Loving Memory
Harley Shea
Jasmine
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:03 AM.


©1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site