Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dogs - General Dog Chat


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-28-2014, 01:54 PM
Babyblue5290's Avatar
Babyblue5290 Babyblue5290 is offline
Happy Meal. Yum.
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 15,965
Default Agility trial, nuisance?

Would it be a nuisance or seen as rude if I took Talon to an agility trial to work on his dog reactivity? The trail I'm thinking of is in a large warehouse type building with barn style doors (working from pics of it online). They welcome well behaved dogs into the trial area, but I'm not sure he's ready for that. Should I email the trail person to let them know or just go?

I was thinking it would be good for him to go to a trail once or twice a month to work on staying calm around other dogs in conjuncture with his dog classes (which are currently on hiatus until the end of march). However, I'm nervous about going and creating a scene.

My plan is to just stay outside, a distance away if possible, and work on staying calm and work towards getting inside. Obviously I'd stay out of peoples way and I'm not going to let him just sit there and freak out lol He's been doing so well in class that I think he's ready for this. He's able to be right next to his classmates without getting super excited and he's going well when we see dogs outside on walks as well, so I think this would be a good next step. He's also not super vocal unless he get REALLY close to an unfamiliar dog and can't get to them, and than it's a a really high pitch screaming whine.

I'm mainly just don't want to ruin other people's day if he does have a freak out, even if I move him back quickly. Also, are there often out of control dogs running around? He's not aggressive, but I don't want to get further back in our training by too many run ins.

I'm hoping to go to the trial this weekend to check it out without Talon and than go the following trial with Talon to start practicing.

Good idea or bad idea? Things I should know before hand about etiquette? not sure if it matters but the trials at this place are NADAC and ASCA.

*edit* Oh and I was thinking it may be a good idea to get him a "I need space" yellow vest for it as well? I figure people at a dog trial would know what it meant and respect it more than the general public.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:00 PM
release the hounds release the hounds is online now
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,011
Default

I think it would be better if you used a class scenario or training day scenario to work on those things initially. It sounds like you've done that, so if you're fairly sure that from a distance you can work on things and have it be positive and work your way closer to the action I'd say it's ok.

But if he's really reactive and can't even sit by the doors without going ape crazy, I'd say it's a bad idea. But if it can be done in a way that people don't even really know you're trying to work on reactivity, I'd say go for it

It's not like all those dogs are angels anyway, but nobody wants to see a dog at the end of its leash going crazy all day either. They worked hard to get to those trials, and though a dog should be ready for anything, they should get the benefit of a fairly clean trial setting from the spectators.

I don't know about agility, but some places don't let dogs in that aren't in the competition. Just something to check out before hand too
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:09 PM
SaraB SaraB is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 5,659
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by release the hounds View Post
But if it can be done in a way that people don't even really know you're trying to work on reactivity, I'd say go for it
This. Reactive dogs aren't supposed to be at trials period, however, many of the dogs there are actually reactive, you just would never know it. The handlers have the ability to manage their dogs well enough and read their stress signals way before a reaction happens. I know this because Zuma is reactive. I would shoot for a small fun match or something along those lines first or visit other classes or training facilities and work there. Unless you are 100% sure you can bring him without him reacting.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:12 PM
MrsBoats's Avatar
MrsBoats MrsBoats is offline
Legion of Zoom Den Mother
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 155
Default

If it is a NADAC trial you are planning on bringing your dog to, this is directly from the NADAC website:

Quote:
18) Can I bring my non-competing dog to a NADAC trial?
Yes, provided the club holding the trial allows non-entered dogs, that your dog has good manners and is kept on leash and under control at all times.

NADAC trials (at least around here) tend to be small and a dog that is reactive will stick out like a sore thumb. If your dog has a big outburst...you might be asked to leave especially if you're not trialing. The NADAC club I trial at has low tolerance for dog aggression at their trials and they will write up and report offending dogs. You don't want anyone to misunderstand what's going on with him if he reacts to another dog.

Personally, I wouldn't use a trial setting to work on something like dog reactivity. That sort of stuff is what classes and matches are for. If you can, I would try to take classes or drop in run thrus in different facilities where there are different dogs he has to learn to behave around. That would be more suitable for what you are trying to do.
__________________
Lars - URO2 UCD UCH Deerwood's Larson Bravo Zulu CDX GN RE NJP NAP NFP OCC OJC TG-E EAC O-WV-E S-TN-E APDT RL2 AOE- L1 & L2 HIC TT CGC TDI
Obedience HIT Winner, 2010 ARC Agility Top 10, 2011 CRC Agility Top 10, 2012 ARC Open Obedience Top 10, 2013 ARC Rally Final Top 10, NADAC Novice/Open Versatility, 2012, 2013 NADAC Judge's Choice Award, '12 - '13 NADAC #1 Rottweiler

Ocean - Deerwood's Oh Stars on the Water! RA NJC TN-O HIC CGC
2013 ARC Agility Top 10

Train 'Em Tasks LLC
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:25 PM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 9,036
Default

Quote:
Personally, I wouldn't use a trial setting to work on something like dog reactivity. That sort of stuff is what classes and matches are for.
This.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:30 PM
Babyblue5290's Avatar
Babyblue5290 Babyblue5290 is offline
Happy Meal. Yum.
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 15,965
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraB View Post
This. Reactive dogs aren't supposed to be at trials period, however, many of the dogs there are actually reactive, you just would never know it. The handlers have the ability to manage their dogs well enough and read their stress signals way before a reaction happens. I know this because Zuma is reactive. I would shoot for a small fun match or something along those lines first or visit other classes or training facilities and work there. Unless you are 100% sure you can bring him without him reacting.
How do you find a fun match? Also, the other places here wouldn't let him "visit" or do you mean do classes at other places?

And that's the thing, I'm not 100% sure. David is, but he can be a bit overconfident. At the opposite end, I'm under confident. >_< lol However, as of now, we've worked at two indoor facilities and one outdoor area, petsmart, petco, around the neighborhood, and at the dog park outside of the fence. In those situations he's able to keep his cool and focus on me, even with one class of 11 other dogs. We've had dogs run up to him outside and he was able to keep a sit until we said it was OK to greet. He's not aggressive, and he does greet well, he's just overexcited when on leash.

I'm really just trying to figure out how to work on this in an environment that's more challenging that what we've already done.



Quote:
Originally Posted by release the hounds View Post
I think it would be better if you used a class scenario or training day scenario to work on those things initially. It sounds like you've done that, so if you're fairly sure that from a distance you can work on things and have it be positive and work your way closer to the action I'd say it's ok.

But if he's really reactive and can't even sit by the doors without going ape crazy, I'd say it's a bad idea. But if it can be done in a way that people don't even really know you're trying to work on reactivity, I'd say go for it

It's not like all those dogs are angels anyway, but nobody wants to see a dog at the end of its leash going crazy all day either. They worked hard to get to those trials, and though a dog should be ready for anything, they should get the benefit of a fairly clean trial setting from the spectators.

I don't know about agility, but some places don't let dogs in that aren't in the competition. Just something to check out before hand too
Oh I emailed the trial secretary to ask about dogs that aren't competing being there and they said that was fine He went to two classes (one Intermediate level basic training and a "Keep Calm" class) over the past two months and he's done really well. One was indoors and the other was outdoors, and before that he was in a class at another facility indoors with 11 other dogs in the class. I wish I had a video of him while working around other dogs, but basically in those classes he had very little issues. In fact, he was the dog that was used for almost all the activities that involved bringing a dog closer to another dog, or in it's line of sight because he was so non-reactive and focused on me.

And see what you mentioned is exactly what I want to aviod. I know people are there to trial and have probably worked hard to get their dogs there, and I in no way want to ruin that for them!

I'm trying to figure out a way to take him to that "next step" in his training because right now he's so cool around the area's we work in that it's very hard to reach threshold, not that I'm trying to reach threshold LOL I just mean he's comfortable in those area's I want to make it to the next step, I'm just unsure how to do that.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:34 PM
RRs's Avatar
RRs RRs is offline
Active Pup
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 3
Default

Go for it. Especially if your plan is to stay around the perimeter initially until you are confident that your dog is comfortable.

There are plenty of reactive dogs that compete in agility. (and even more reactive owners/handlers) The first time I attended a trials I was shocked at how many times I was told by an owner/handler to give their dog some space because it was reactive/aggressive. I suspect some of it was out of concern that their dog might start something that my dog would finish. (She wouldn't - she is a sweetheart.) My initial thought was "Seriously? You regularly attend trails with hundreds of other dogs present and your dog is still reactive? Maybe you need to work on training other than jumps and weaves."
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-28-2014, 02:44 PM
Babyblue5290's Avatar
Babyblue5290 Babyblue5290 is offline
Happy Meal. Yum.
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 15,965
Default

Ok, so it seems like my main question would than be, when is it time to advance from the classroom or general area's to a trial situation? Or what would be a good stepping stone between the two? At this point I can almost guarantee no reaction in a classroom or pet store, but that's not really a trial atmosphere.

I've worked on focus in as many area's as I can think of that there would be dogs, but I feel like he's so used to those area's that he just doesn't care about the dogs anymore. How would you test if he's ready for the next step?

I'm thinking maybe I could take him to a large park I know of that he hasn't been to before and work there, but the chance of being run at in an aggressive manner by other dogs is fairly high at that park as far as I hear. So I'm kind of hesitant on that one.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-28-2014, 03:01 PM
AgilityPup's Avatar
AgilityPup AgilityPup is offline
Agility freak!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 5,204
Default

Ask the trainers of your class if they have some dogs that they could work with you with. New dogs. If you train with an agility club, ask if you could come work him while they're running. I know personally I have worked with my dogs with issues at trials, but any time I did, I was also there competing.

I would assume that when you see dogs 'amped up' you will see him closer to threshold, where he is a herder. So I would ask the people in the class or the trainers if they know a good, dog friendly dog you can barrow. I have done it with Psyche (been the good, dog friendly dog) and worked on getting her all up and ready to go around other dogs who were dog reactive so owners could work on controlling their dogs there.

OR! Another possibility is to go and make friends with some people at the agility trial and ask them if you could come out with him someday when they practice and do what I said above.

If he hasn't been around dogs doing agility before, I would start with one or two dogs at a time anyway, instead of a whole trial.
__________________

Zoey - Mini Aussie / Psyche - Border Collie / Simi - GSD
Forever Missed Bella - GSD [03-11-07 - 09-17-10]
Going For 'Good Dog!' Blog
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-28-2014, 03:02 PM
Sekah's Avatar
Sekah Sekah is offline
The Monster.
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RRs View Post
My initial thought was "Seriously? You regularly attend trails with hundreds of other dogs present and your dog is still reactive? Maybe you need to work on training other than jumps and weaves."
That's hardly fair. Reactivity can be worked on until it's imperceptible, but those neural pathways are worn into the brain for the rest of a dog's life. If these pathways aren't used, they will grow over just like a woodland path. However, the path is always there and the risk of a reactivity episode is always present. To me, asking for people to give you and your dog space speaks of your responsibility towards your dog's needs.

My dog is reactive. We regularly take part in agility, flyball, obedience competitions, and we take part in demos where all the dogs are high on adrenaline. No one would know to look at my dog that she's reactive (or any of the other dogs there) but that's because we're all cautious and conscientious about giving everyone lots of room to work.

Dealing with reactivity is 50% training and 50% management.
__________________

Cheynat's O' Lady Midnight CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh-S CGN HIC, Esq.
Megatron, Heat Vampire
Ci Da: Good Dog
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:34 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site