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  #1  
Old 08-23-2008, 07:53 AM
RedyreRottweilers
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Default How to STOP Puppy Biting

Probably one of the most common complaints and training requests trainers hear is about puppy biting.

All puppies mouth and bite. It's how they learn about their world. This is a normal and to be expected part of bringing up a puppy.

Here are links to articles that explain how to TEACH the puppy to manage his mouth, and how to handle his teeth on human skin. This is called teaching a puppy BITE INHIBITION. It is one of the most important lessons your puppy can learn in his early life.


http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIP...Inhibition.php

http://www.phsspca.org/training/puppy_biting.htm

http://www.jersey.net/~mountaindog/berner1/bitestop.htm

http://www.crickethollowfarm.com/biteinhib.htm

http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/archives/bite.txt

http://www.doglogic.com/obedienc.htm#biteinhib

http://www.aylmer-hull-spca.qc.ca/biteinhib_e.html
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2008, 01:57 AM
Quak Ai Chin Quak Ai Chin is offline
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Oh thanks for all the links! This is exactly what i need
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  #3  
Old 09-11-2008, 04:20 AM
liana liana is offline
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Default How to stop puppy biting?

The owner to teach the puppy what is acceptable behavior and what is not. Puppy Training Biting Tips:-
1) Start training your puppy early (6 or 7 weeks old).
2) Let your puppy know that his biting hurts you. Give a sharp "ouch" or yelp like a dog. This will tell him that he's been too rough on you and make him be gentler next time.
3) If the puppy ignores your "hurt" reaction, repeat the yelp or "ouch" and leave the room for a couple of minutes. This will let your puppy know that when he bites, he can lose his playmates.
4) Give positive reinforcement. Whenever a puppy licks you minus using his teeth, reward him for it and give him lots of praise.
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  #4  
Old 10-03-2008, 11:38 PM
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Domestika Domestika is offline
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Just wanted to post some information I was given today that may help someone, somewhere. This is some additional information to help if you're considering, or are using, "time outs" to curb biting. And then some additional information/help/suggestions on biting below that.


Use three cue words to explain to your puppy exactly what you are and aren't going to accept for biting. There's no "ouch" or "NO!". They are said kindly.

1. A word that tells your puppy she is close to crossing the line into the biting that you don't accept. Basically, a word that means "Uh oh, keep that up and you're in trouble". My word is "Gentle". This is also the word I use when I am teaching her to take treats carefully so she knows that it means "have a softer mouth".

2. A word or phrase that tells your dog "you crossed the line". Some people use "too bad" or "bummer!". You'd say this word as soon as you receive the kind of biting that crosses the line you've set (the amount of pressure you're NOT ok with). The timeout would come immediately after this word.

3. A word or phrase that tells the dog she's pulled the biting back enough to save her from a time out. Most people use "thank you". I use "nice". It lets the dog know that she's back at a safe level of biting/mouthing, so it indicates to her exactly where you want the level of mouthing.


Other tips/suggestions not related to time outs:

-if you have a leg biter carry a long, dangling toy at times when you expect leg biting (first thing in the morning, on a walk, preparing her dinner, etc) and redirect her to that

-if your puppy mouthes/bites strangers when she meets them, have a toy ready, let them know you're training her to not bite and give them the toy to give to her to bite instead while they pet her

-if your puppy can't be redirected to focus on a dangling toy rather than your skin...I would recommend trying more and more and more different kinds of toys. There are some toys I would expect would be VERY enticing and my dog couldn't care less. And then toys that I don't even understand...she LOVES. Of the 30+ toys I've bought my dog, there are maybe 2 that she absolutely LOVES and will focus on instead of me. So it's trial and error. Expensive, but to me...finding those 2 that she loves is TOTALLY priceless (and will pay off in the long run because it may just help her stop biting and ripping your clothes)

-when the puppy is mouthing in a polite way use your "thank you" or "nice" or whatever in a fairly subdued manner, and then "where's your toy?". Go get a toy and LAVISH attention on her as long as she has the toy in her mouth. Make her think that having a toy in her mouth is what gets her the very best attention.

-sounds weird, BUT. When giving treats, hold it with your index finger and thumb. When she opens her mouth put the treat further into her mouth than you normally would (behind her front teeth) and push your index finger down on her tongue as you drop the treat in her mouth and pull your hand back. It sounds awkward as heck, and it is at first. My dog constantly turned her head to the side so I missed her tongue and then used her back molars to bite my finger while it was in her mouth... It doesn't have to be a hard push on the tongue at all. Just having your finger there disrupts her jaws from clenching down. I suppose this might be considered adversive for the hardcore positive reinforcement types? My dog is quite sensitive and it didn't discourage her from wanting the treats I was offering...but after about 10 of these little tongue depressions she was taking the treats from my fingers like she was trying to extract a sliver from my fingertip. And that's after wearing bandaids for a week because she had ripped up my fingers so badly when giving treats. Use your cue word for "don't bite any harder than that!" while you're doing this to let the dog connect the word with having a soft, mindful mouth.

-My trainer also suggested some games to teach self control. "Go wild and freeze" and "tug and freeze". In "go wild", you basically run around like an idiot, cheering your dog along, clapping, hooting and hollering and getting her excited, then once she's moderately aroused you stop and become very calm. You kneel down, speak very calmly to her, give her treats very gently, pet her slowly, help her relax for a minute or so. Then back to "go wild"! "Tug and freeze" is the same. Tug, tug, tug then "drop it" (if she knows it) and some treats, gentle talking, slow petting. Then tug, tug, tug. Not sure what you'd do for that one if your dog didn't know "drop it"...


This is what I learned today during our private session with a trainer. Hopefully someone can benefit from this. I'm sure not everyone will agree with all of it, and some people may find that none of it works on their puppy at ALL. But I know what it's like to be desperate for ANY ideas.
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:20 PM
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G94 G94 is offline
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I wrote an article about this subject, so I'll just highlight the key points here.

Quote:
Aggression biting is accompanied by growls and a fixed stare. It is not a continuous action, but rather snap, release and retreat. When this happens, restrain the puppy's muzzle in the same way explained for play biting, accompanied by a loud, sharp, "No!"

One way to teach your puppy that you are dominant is to wrap him in a baby's blanket or towel and lay him in your lap while you are watching TV, reading, or taking part in a conversation with someone. Keep him there for thirty to sixty minutes - until he ceases to wiggle and becomes calm. This sends him a forceful message that says, "I am in control."

In order to get your puppy to obey your commands, you must gain his respect and trust. You do this by teaching him basic commands while he's very young. Be consistent. Never let your puppy away with unacceptable behavior. Use repetition. Do the same thing over and over and... well, you get the idea.

When your puppy is successful in his efforts to please you, praise him and pat his head or scratch his ears. When he fails, try again. Never physically reprimand your dog. This breeds fear and fear will make him bite.

Interact with your dog. Play with him, walk with him and bond with him. This will give him a desire to please you and when you reprimand him, he will get the message. Soon, your puppy will give up both play and aggressive biting and mature into a happy, healthy dog that will bring much joy into your life.
You can read my full article here: http://ezinearticles.com/?Dog-Obedie...ing&id=1609551
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  #6  
Old 10-31-2008, 03:28 PM
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TheGoldenRetriever TheGoldenRetriever is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G94 View Post
I wrote an article about this subject, so I'll just highlight the key points here.
Quote:
Aggression biting is accompanied by growls and a fixed stare. It is not a continuous action, but rather snap, release and retreat. When this happens, restrain the puppy's muzzle in the same way explained for play biting, accompanied by a loud, sharp, "No!"
Quote:
One way to teach your puppy that you are dominant is to wrap him in a baby's blanket or towel and lay him in your lap while you are watching TV, reading, or taking part in a conversation with someone. Keep him there for thirty to sixty minutes - until he ceases to wiggle and becomes calm. This sends him a forceful message that says, "I am in control."


PLEASE STOP advising people to do to puppies the things in quotes from you, highlighted above!!

Please read the articles linked in RedyreRottweilers original post for proper explanations and tips for bite inhibition.

Quote:
Never physically reprimand your dog. This breeds fear and fear will make him bite.
You are contradicting yourself.
The highlighted "training" methods you suggested in the above two quoted passages ARE indeed physical reprimands!
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  #7  
Old 10-31-2008, 04:35 PM
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dr2little dr2little is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G94 View Post
I wrote an article about this subject, so I'll just highlight the key points here.



You can read my full article here: http://ezinearticles.com/?Dog-Obedie...ing&id=1609551
Reading a few books and regurgitating incorrect and potentially harmful information from other 'professionals' hardly qualifies you to give advice on dog training.

It's clear by your posts that you'd best seek advice from professionals current and educated in the science of training before atempting to 'educate' others. Some of what I've read on your link is downright frightening!
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  #8  
Old 01-17-2009, 09:42 PM
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I have to read through all those links, because this is the main problem our dog has and nothing seems to work. Since he is a Pit bull/Akita mix, he can get quite aggressive and doesn't know when to stop. If you try to pet him, he starts biting your hand. He has a lot of toys he can bite on, all nicely put together in a toy box (well no not anymore, he was biting the toy box, so we need another one). While playing he starts grabbing your arms and hands and bites them, and he's not listening to what we say.

I hope that we can find some tips and tricks in those links that help.
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  #9  
Old 03-24-2009, 05:25 AM
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Domestika Domestika is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanama View Post
Why not give your puppy a lesson when he bites something? Next time he should remember it.
Define "lesson".
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  #10  
Old 03-24-2009, 07:46 AM
RedyreRottweilers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanama View Post
Why not give your puppy a lesson when he bites something? Next time he should remember it.
Hanama, I have raised numerous puppies over my fifty years of life so far. NEVER have I had a single issue with puppy biting.

I have a breed that grows up to be very large and powerful with a courageous temperament. I prefer to use my brain rather than a raised hand to train dogs. I have had a fair amount of success doing it that way.

Let's hear what you call a "lesson". Better yet, come on over. I have some dogs you can practice that on.
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