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  #41  
Old 04-26-2013, 01:39 PM
JessLough JessLough is offline
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Originally Posted by AdrianneIsabel View Post
The financial obligations with the breed are nerve-wracking. They are expensive, even well bred are often unhealthy, and often temperamentally scary. Many people in the breed misunderstand proper guard behaviors and take instability, paranoia, and insociability.

Something to consider.
This.

After spending thousands of dollars and having one imported from a wonderful breeder in Italy and having to euth at 6 months, I'd be very, very careful about where any corsos are coming from, and making sure I have plenty saved up for health issues that crop up.
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  #42  
Old 04-26-2013, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by AdrianneIsabel View Post
The financial obligations with the breed are nerve-wracking. They are expensive, even well bred are often unhealthy, and often temperamentally scary. Many people in the breed misunderstand proper guard behaviors and take instability, paranoia, and insociability.

Something to consider.
I was just going to say, everything else aside, finding a good breeder is going to be tough. Finding a good breeder who would sell to someone who thinks ACD experience prepares them is going to be just about impossible.
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  #43  
Old 04-26-2013, 01:52 PM
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this decision is in its infancy ... if I decide at any time that neither of these breeds would be a fit for me then that would be ok, I also have contacts with a few really good ACD breeders.

I dont consider it a failure to admit that a breed isnt for me, but I certainly want to guive a breed a chance before vetoing it
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  #44  
Old 04-26-2013, 02:18 PM
Whitewave Whitewave is offline
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I don't know you or any one else on here for that matter, but I do know Dogos. And if you can't handle the questions and statements in this thread, then you surely can NOT handle a Dogo. I've been on the Dogo board for 15 yrs and let me tell you real Dogo people are as tough as the Dogos themselves and will argue and never cave on their opinions! The DACA has changed hands and members so much that I quit following it!

There are plenty of people that will sell a Dogo to anybody with cash even so called good breeders, just b/c they show and have ribbons doesn't make them a good breeder. But many sadly end up dying in shelter before they are 2 yrs of age b/c the person couldn't handle them and the breeder is no where to be found. Last foster was a 10 month old puppy, full registration papers, BAER test and everything. Owner paid $$$ for him and shipping to boot. But couldn't handle him anymore. He had no obedience training no training of any kind really and was totally out of a control. A 100lb puppy that did what he wanted when he wanted and pitched a fit if he couldn't do it. I have handled many dogs, but the strength of this one was a force to be reckoned with. I could not even safely walk him by myself. He ended up having to go to another foster home with a large man who was better able to control him and ended up keeping him. But even that, he had to have surgery to repair a torn bicep when the dog busted the front storm door down and went after a loose dog in the yard and he tackled him to stop him!
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  #45  
Old 04-26-2013, 02:39 PM
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Hummm
you are the pack the pack is you. i dont have a dogo or a corso however i have two jug heads that are guardian type dogs, but everyone who said it travels right down the leash was right. these dogs read you like a book in large print, and they will act on what they think is right, before you can say sit boy.
Also prey drive is serious bisness imagine, walking down the road a little dog is walking on the other side of the road, your dog sees it you do not. your dog charges out either gets hit by a car or gets across the street and gets the small dog. it happened so fast all you have time for is to blink, cause your dog ripped the leash out of your hand. he did not think about it he just did it. if you are a weak leader he is not going to look to you for guidence thats a very hard instinct to override in the best of times if at all.

these dogs are a very serious reponsibility the learn curve is pretty steep. when most novices finish their research they are so sure of how to do everything then the problems come in the owners who refuse to learn lose there dogs the good owners learn from there mistakes and fix the problem they most likely caused if you really do get a dogo or corso which i am not sure is a good idea research yes get a very good breeder and keep a open mind maybe the best thing to learn is whats a good idea verses bad alpha rolling bad
othing in life for free good get a mentor if you can and use common sense. btw there is a balance with domince/positive training for people with guardian breeds really must leanyou cant be a tyrant nor a marsmellow

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  #46  
Old 04-26-2013, 05:15 PM
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Ignoring the drama in this thread:

I don't typically recommend a protective type guardian breed, ESPECIALLY such a powerful molosser, to anyone who has any kind of anxiety, social or otherwise. Mental state passes quickly from a handler to a dog, and certain breeds (usually the smarter, more one-person type dogs) pick it up faster, and a molosser with any kind of instability without a VERY experienced handler is going to become very dangerous very quickly. People with anxiety sometimes do look towards these breeds for protection and to feel "safer" but honestly, any large dog is going to do just as good of a job dissuading unwanted company, and nobody should be getting a dog like this for protection without YEARS of experience in handling them for other purposes.

That said, I don't think nobody with anxiety is capable of handling a dog like a dogo or corso - lots of people on this thread do so. But before you look into a breed like this, I think you need to be able to function (and do some comfortably) normally in social settings like clubs, classes, and public to socialize your puppy.

I've only met one Dogo, and from what I can tell, he was EXTREMELY watered dog. He was an apartment dog, and let people approach and pet him quite calmly in public, so I'm not sure that's the norm. However, I've known a few corsos.

All I can say is go meet some. Email local breeders and say you're interested in learning more about the breed, can you come and visit. Try to find a show, and especially if interested in bitework or PP, a club to visit many times before deciding what breed to bring home. ACD experience isn't going to TOUCH preparing you to own a dogo or even a corso. There's a very good reason you don't see these dogs walking down the street all the time. They are way too much for most people, including incredibly dog savvy people, to handle. They're not even all that common in bite sports, because even for people who participate in those sports and lead that lifestyles, they are an awful lot of dog.

The reasons you're listing in this thread make me believe you might be better suited to a breed like a rottie, GSD, or maybe some kind of less "intense" mastiff like an English or Bullmastiff.
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  #47  
Old 04-26-2013, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianneIsabel View Post
You'll be fighting an uphill battle with a dogo or corso in Bitework, they aren't play and prey driven as easily and require a lot of defensive pressure which when applied incorrectly can destroy your dog or create a monster, meaning if you plan to go down this route find the club first and the dog second.

Second, dogo do not have a very old history, corso are a relatively recreated breed and vastly different with lines. Corso carry a lot of instability and I would venture 80% of the breed is mentally or physically undesirable.

Dogo are interesting but can be hard to train, as some breeds are inherently more difficult. They too can vary by lines and you really need to be clear what you want in a dog in order to find the right line.

My buddies dogo that grew up with Arnold was a cross of a hog hunting line dogo and a conformation/sport line dog. He was a pushy dog, took naturally to defense, and was the first dog I had seen go up the leash over an unfair correction. He was stunningly agile for his size but relatively insecure about being alone and had SA issues. He was tolerant but not strange dog friendly. He wasn't much for sporting but he was a great hiking partner and something to look at.

I have worked with a few other dogo and a lot of ACD, I wouldn't compare them. I wouldn't compare the difficulty of a Malinois to a dogo, not that dogos are drastically harder but it is a whole different ball game, one that suits totally different people.
Im intrigued by your assertion that Corso are unstable. I was thinking of getting some myself, down the road when I have a farm for them to guard

What is unstable about them? Im gonna be bummered if I have to pick a different guard breed :c
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  #48  
Old 04-26-2013, 07:06 PM
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I think it is also worth mentioning that I would also be open to a rescue corso/dogo/ mastiff. I have seen menu groups on Facebook that I have friended & plan to contact when the time comes.
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  #49  
Old 04-26-2013, 07:28 PM
crazedACD crazedACD is offline
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Originally Posted by Dogdragoness View Post
I think it is also worth mr tionint that I would also be open to a rescue corso/dogo/ mastiff. I have seen menu groups on Facebook that I have friended & plan to contact when the time comes
I think that if you 'have to have' one of these breeds this would be a better option, as you will be able to better ascertain the temperament as an adult. You might be able to find those flukes where the dog is more suited to you. You would just have to be open to the people in the rescue assisting in finding the right dog, not insist on the one that is prettiest or whatever.
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  #50  
Old 04-26-2013, 08:07 PM
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Don't worry ... I don't mind a "face only mother could love" as long as the temperment matches mine ... Not shot looks. I go for the dog that "clicks", not the prettiest.

I have friended a rescue group on Facebook that helps dogos, corsi & other mastiffs.
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