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  #31  
Old 03-28-2013, 08:04 PM
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I can't think of any more right now but:

Please Stop Laughing At Me by Jodee Blanco
"While other children were daydreaming about dances, first kisses, and college, Jodee Blanco was trying to figure out how to go from homeroom to study hall without being taunted or spit upon as she walked through the halls. This powerful, unforgettable memoir chronicles how one child was shunned—and even physically abused—by her classmates from elementary school through high school. It is an unflinching look at what it means to be the outcast, how even the most loving parents can get it all wrong, why schools are often unable to prevent disaster, and how bullying has been misunderstood and mishandled by the mental health community." -(Barnes & Noble)

One of the saddest, most eye-opening books I have ever read, it really stuck with me.
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  #32  
Old 03-28-2013, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Oko View Post
I can't think of any more right now but:

Please Stop Laughing At Me by Jodee Blanco
"While other children were daydreaming about dances, first kisses, and college, Jodee Blanco was trying to figure out how to go from homeroom to study hall without being taunted or spit upon as she walked through the halls. This powerful, unforgettable memoir chronicles how one child was shunned—and even physically abused—by her classmates from elementary school through high school. It is an unflinching look at what it means to be the outcast, how even the most loving parents can get it all wrong, why schools are often unable to prevent disaster, and how bullying has been misunderstood and mishandled by the mental health community." -(Barnes & Noble)

One of the saddest, most eye-opening books I have ever read, it really stuck with me.
Wow. I want to read this book. This is another big reason why we choose to homeschool. Our children are tortured and no one does anything... Or can do anything.

This reminds me of another book that touches me deeply. The child called IT!! Horrifying book that makes you want to rescue every child to ever be mistreated. That book and "like dandilion dust" is another one. It's about abuse and adoption. I actually woke Brian one night weeping while reading this book. It was one of the reasons I really felt thw calling to try to adopt one day.
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  #33  
Old 03-28-2013, 09:37 PM
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This reminds me of another book that touches me deeply. The child called IT!! Horrifying book that makes you want to rescue every child to ever be mistreated.
I read that book in college, and it was a true eye opener for someone who doesn't even remember being spanked as a kid. There were times when I just had to put the book down and take a break because what I was reading was so horrifying.
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  #34  
Old 03-28-2013, 10:04 PM
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I read that book in college, and it was a true eye opener for someone who doesn't even remember being spanked as a kid. There were times when I just had to put the book down and take a break because what I was reading was so horrifying.
Same here. I was a teen when I read it and it was just horrible. Such a moving story.
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  #35  
Old 03-28-2013, 10:13 PM
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Flatland by A. Square

"Either this is madness, or it is hell."
"It is neither, it is knowledge."
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  #36  
Old 03-29-2013, 12:31 AM
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The Selfish Gene, by Richard Dawkins. It changed my life; changed my casual interest in biology into a passion and shaped my academic career. I need to reread it; I haven't in a couple of years.
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  #37  
Old 03-29-2013, 01:18 AM
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She recently bought Paper Towns and I'm looking forward to reading that as well.
I read Paper Towns a few years ago and really enjoyed it. (Actually it was an audio book I listened to during a 15-hour road trip. Which made the book's description of their 24-hour road trip particularly entertaining for me. )

I think the first book that changed my life was a dictionary of dog breeds, LOL. I remember reading it in the library, years before my family got our first dog. Interestingly, I was particularly interested in the breeds that the book said made good service dogs. I also remember distinctly that that book put collies on my "dream dog" list. Remember, I was like, 8 years old at the time, LOL. It'd be another 20 years or so, but I did finally get my dream dog.

I read "A Child Called It" in college, right around the time when I was about to graduate and trying to decide between dog training as a career, and social work as a career. The book is one thing that pushed me toward dogs.

I absolutely have to put "Harry Potter" on the list, too. I started it in high school, and that series is what really taught me how to analyze plots and characters in a way I had never done before. I read and re-read the books so many times it'd probably be embarrasing to admit if I could possibly remember, trying to figure out how the series would end.... And, incedently, I was dissappointed when I was mostly right.

My behavioral psychology textbook changed my life... Almost every day at work I reference something from the book, and regrettably, I actually sold it back to the bookstore at the end of that semester.
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  #38  
Old 03-29-2013, 01:58 AM
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The Giver was on my list as well. Loved that book.

Grace in the Wilderness by Aranka Siegel is another good one. Very thought provoking, told in the view of a teenage girl surviving the Holocaust, being imprisoned in camps, and then the years following the liberation.

Letters from Rifka by Karen Hesse. It's a children's historical novel, but another one that stuck out to me.
Quote:
“America,” the girl repeated. “What will you do there?”
I was silent for a little time.
“I will do everything there,” I answered.

Rifka knows nothing about America when she flees from Russia with her family in 1919. But she dreams she will at last be safe from the Russian soldiers and their harsh treatment of the Jews in the new country. Throughout her journey, Rifka carries with her a cherished volume of poetry by Alexander Pushkin. In it, she records her observations and experiences in the form of letters to her beloved cousin she has left behind. Strong-hearted and determined, Rifka must endure a great deal: humiliating examinations by doctors and soldiers, deadly typhus, separation from all she has ever known and loved, murderous storms at sea—and as if this is not enough, the loss of her glorious golden hair. And even if she does make it to America, she’s not sure America will have her.
Earth's Children Series including...(yes, in THIS ORDER)
The Clan of the Cave Bear
The Valley of Horses
The Mammoth Hunters
The Plains of Passage
The Shelters of Stone
The Land of Painted Caves

I found these books browsing my school library, and I'm pretty sure they were NOT supposed to be there! Some interesting caveman smut and all. Still interesting none the less, the entire story is set 30,000 ago, in the last Ice Age when there were more than one "type" of humans wandering about. Interesting views on the conflicts between them, the flora, fauna, and it all really just revolves around the life of one girl/woman Ayla. This kinda covers it, really:

Quote:
As a whole, the series is a tale of personal discovery: coming-of-age, invention, cultural complexities, and, beginning with the second book, explicit romantic sex. It tells the story of Ayla, an orphaned Cro-Magnon girl who is adopted and raised by a tribe of Neanderthals and who later embarks on a journey to find the Others (her own kind), meeting along the way her romantic interest and supporting co-protagonist, Jondalar.
The story arc in part comprises a travel tale, in which the two lovers journey from the region of Ukraine to Jondalar's home in what is now France, along an indirect route up the Danube River valley. In the third and fourth works, they meet various groups of Cro-Magnons and encounter their cultural contexts, including bona-fide technologies. The couple finally return to southwestern France and Jondalar's people in the fifth novel. The series includes a highly-detailed focus on botany, herbology, herbal medicine, archaeology and anthropology, but it also features substantial amounts of romance, coming-of-age crises, and — employing significant literary license — the attribution of certain advances and inventions to the protagonists.
In addition, Auel's series incorporates a number of recent archeological and anthropological theories. It also suggested the notion of Sapiens-Neanderthal interbreeding. Although in recent years the sequencing of Neandertal mitochondrial DNA first indicated that it was highly improbable that Neandertals contributed to the human genome,[1] further research of the human genome has revealed conclusively that Neanderthals did in fact interbreed with non-African humans.[2](Wiki)
I personally loved the books (caveman smut aside), but I wouldn't recommend them to the age I was reading them at!

Circles of Stone is similar to the Earth's Children series, but probably more up most people's alley. It tells the story, not so much description, travels through the ages, less awkward caveman sex, etc, etc. Much more spiritual.

Quote:
Evoking the narrative sweep of The Clan of the Cave Bear and the spiritual resonance of The Celestine Prophecy, Joan Dahr Lambert creates an extraordinary novel of prehistoric life...

In this compelling adventure, the stories of three wise women -- each called Zena, yet born thousands of generations apart -- unfold in a compassionate and moving saga that celebrates the remarkable growth of the human spirit.

Ranging from the African savanna more than one million years ago to the fertile shores of the Red Sea to the magnificent limestone caves of the Pyrenees mountains -- where the first artists painted the firelit wonders of their existence -- scene after breathtaking scene draws us into their lives as they negotiate a world they do not understand. In this world, an ostrich eggshell becomes a wondrous device for carrying water and the earth's upheavals reveal a lush, lifesaving oasis to a starving tribe.

With striking detail, Circles of Stone reinvents the incredible lives of our distant ancestors. As the human heart and soul emerge in a volatile dance of experience, language, and meaning, Circles of Stone becomes an unforgettable, supremely entertaining read.
Well, I guess it's obvious what sort of books I enjoy. ALL the historical fiction.
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  #39  
Old 03-29-2013, 04:23 AM
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A Child Called "It"
By Dave Pelzer.


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Originally Posted by Fran101 View Post

- The Giver
Lois Lowry
Yes yes yes yes 1000 times YES.
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  #40  
Old 03-29-2013, 09:51 AM
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Fran, I was gonna say Twilight

Seriously though, I do love it. I don't think either Bella or Edward are perfect, but I do think that a lot of the "unhealthy relationship" stuff can be chalked up to the fact that you're dealing with something supernatural. Yes, Bella is obsessed with Edward, but that is because she feels this pull from him that is supernatural. In the end it is because she is meant to be a Vampire. They explain in the last book that the reason she never felt complete as a human is because she was meant to become a Vampire someday. And she has a pull toward the supernatural. Yes, Edward is extremely protective of Bella, but again, they explain, that as a Vampire, once Edward falls for her, he will do anything to keep her safe, and he doesn't always make the best decisions, but I think that's kind of the point because even though he is a Vampire, he still has human qualities.

Twilight really did change my life. I am constantly reading it lol! In fact, I'm reading it again right now! I just love it. And if you haven't, you should read what is available of "Midnight Sun". It is Twilight from Edward's point of view. It clears a lot of things up as to what he was thinking when he did/said certain things.

Another book I think people should read (if you don't mind some cursing) is 11/22/63 by Steven King. It is extremely good and is related to the Kennedy Assasination. The main character is trying to go back in time and change what happened. It's very good.
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